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The 7 Best Hiking Shoes for Women of 2024

We put women's hiking shoes from Salomon, La Sportiva, Merrell, Keen, and others to the test to find the best
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Best Hiking Shoes Women Review (We tested the top 15 pairs of hiking shoes on the market and are happy to share our favorites to help you select the...)
We tested the top 15 pairs of hiking shoes on the market and are happy to share our favorites to help you select the best option for your next adventure.
Credit: Trish Matheny
By Myrha Colt, Trish Matheny, and Mary Witlacil  ⋅  Apr 17, 2024

The Best Women's Hiking Shoes for 2024


On the hunt for new hiking shoes? In 11 years, we have put 126 pairs of the best hiking shoes through extensive testing. In this update, our all-female hiking team compares the 18 top women's hiking shoes available today. Our hiking experts have done the leg work, busting out hundreds of miles over the years through deserts, forests, mountains, and streams. We carry loaded packs, consider all-day comfort, and evaluate traction over and through wet, loose, slippery, and uneven terrain. From differing foot shapes to varied trail conditions, we consider it all and rank each shoe according to our on-trail experiences. Over months of side-by-side comparison and testing, we tease apart the differences between these shoes and share our findings to help you hone in on your perfect pair.

Hiking in the great outdoors is a ton of fun, whether you load up on gear or head out with nothing more than some water and a solid pair of shoes. And if you are the kind of hiker who loves to have all the high-end gear, we've probably tested it and have recommendations for you, like the best women's daypacks and best hydration packs. If you are planning longer treks carrying a heavy pack or just prefer to have a bit more support, you might be interested in our reviews on the best women's high-top hiking boots. If you're looking for the best men's hiking shoes, we've tested those too.

Editor's Note: Our women's hiking shoe review was updated on April 17, 2024, to include 3 new products along with updated media and testing perspectives.

Related: Best Hiking Shoes for Men

Top 18 Hiking Shoes - Test Results

Displaying 1 - 5 of 18
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Awards Editors' Choice Award  Top Pick Award  Top Pick Award 
Price $149.25 at Backcountry
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$165.00 at REI
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$95.97 at Backcountry
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Check Price at REI
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Overall Score
79
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66
78
Star Rating
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Pros Excellent traction, responsive and stable support, breathable waterproof protection, comfortable right out of the boxAmple cushioning, great traction when dry, stable, supportiveVersatile, nimble, excellent traction, excellent waterproof protection, supportive midfootSpacious toe box, great traction, waterproof, durable, stableExcellent traction, very supportive, breathable design, comfortable for various foot shapes
Cons Expensive, sizing runs large, 100% recycled polyester laces may require replacementRigid footbed, heavy, limited breathability, too much shoeSingle-pull lacing system has limited adjustability, fit favors narrow feet, not recommended for cross-country travel, less breathableExpensive, heavy and bulky design, odd footbed shape, limited breathabilityNot waterproof, minor durability issues
Bottom Line A stand-out hiking shoe that features ample comfort, great traction, a stable base of support, and a high quality, durable, and waterproof mesh upperA great balance between strength and softness, with exceptional cushioning, deep tread, and a roomy yet supportive baseA comfortable, supportive, and waterproof shoe that offers excellent and responsive traction in a sleek, modern packageNot our first choice for warmer climates due to the waterproof design that lacks breathability and favors a wide footAn excellent choice for those looking to navigate popular trails that feature polished granite or slippery sandstone
Rating Categories La Sportiva Spire G... Oboz Sawtooth X Low... Salomon X Ultra 4 G... Keen Targhee III Lo... La Sportiva TX4 - W...
Comfort (25%)
8.0
7.0
7.0
6.0
8.0
Support (20%)
8.0
8.0
8.0
7.0
9.0
Traction (15%)
9.0
7.0
8.0
7.0
9.0
Water Resistance (15%)
9.0
8.0
9.0
7.0
5.0
Weight (15%)
5.5
4.0
6.5
5.0
7.4
Durability (10%) Sort Icon
8.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
Specs La Sportiva Spire G... Oboz Sawtooth X Low... Salomon X Ultra 4 G... Keen Targhee III Lo... La Sportiva TX4 - W...
Measured Weight (per pair, size 8.5) 1.68 lbs 1.88 lbs 1.54 lbs 1.74 lbs 1.42 lbs
Upper Abrasion-resistant mesh Oiled nubuck leather, Cordura fabric mesh Synthetic textile Oiled nubuck leather, mesh Nubuck leather/1.5mm polyurethane TechLite rand/Vibram rubber toe rand
Lining Gore-Tex Surround B-DRY waterproof/breathable membrane Gore-Tex KEEN.Dry waterproof, breathable membrane Nonslip mesh
Flood Level 3.75" 3.5" 3.75" 3.5" 3.5"
Midsole EVA Rubber-blended Adaptive Cushioning Technology foam EVA EVA Dual density EVA Traverse Injection MEMlex
Outsole Vibram XS Trek True Tread rubber Rubber Contagrip KEEN All-Terrain Rubber Vibram Megagrip Traverse with Impact Brake System
Width Options Regular Regular, wide Regular Regular Regular


Best Overall Women's Hiking Shoe


La Sportiva Spire GTX - Women's


79
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort 8.0
  • Support 8.0
  • Traction 9.0
  • Water Resistance 9.0
  • Weight 5.5
  • Durability 8.0
Weight (per pair): 1.68 pounds | Lining: Gore-Tex Surround
REASONS TO BUY
Top-notch traction
Responsive and stable support
Breathable waterproof protection
Spacious toe box
Versatile
REASONS TO AVOID
Expensive
Sizing runs big
100% recycled polyester laces may require replacement

The La Sportiva Spire GTX features a low-profile design that combines the agility of a trail runner with the stability of a hiking boot into one unstoppable trail shoe. The fit is comfortable right out of the box, though it may run a little big and favor those with a high arch. The abrasion-resistant mesh upper combined with the compression-molded midsole offers excellent support while remaining flexible, whether day hiking or considering an extended trip into the backcountry with the added weight of a pack. The Vibram XS Trek outsole and Stability Control System built into this design are ready to tackle any type of terrain without sacrificing ground feel underfoot or responsiveness on the steeps. This shoe features one of the highest flood levels, measuring 3.75 inches above the ankle, and a waterproof membrane that remains breathable without allowing water to penetrate the shoe. Whether crossing creeks during high runoff or moving through melting, slushy snow, this shoe is up for the challenge.

For some who are seeking simple day hikes on well-maintained trails, this shoe may be overbuilt with too many additional features. The waterproof membrane may also be too hot for those who plan to hike at lower elevations during the heat of summer. And finally, though we love Sportiva's nod towards sustainability by including 100% recycled polyester laces, they may require adjustment or replacement depending on your foot shape and how much off-trail travel you get up to. While the Spire is one of the most expensive designs that we tested, we believe it's worth every penny and will last for many hiking seasons to come. If this shoe is a bit out of your budget, the Merrell Moab 3 stands out for its price to performance ratio.

Read more: La Sportiva Spire GTX review

The Spire has Gore-tex waterproofing to keep you dry, no matter what you come across on your hike.
Credit: Trish Matheny

Best Bang for the Buck


Merrell Moab 3 - Women's


68
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort 8.0
  • Support 8.0
  • Traction 7.0
  • Water Resistance 4.0
  • Weight 5.3
  • Durability 7.5
Weight (per pair): 1.7 pounds | Lining: Recycled mesh
REASONS TO BUY
Solid traction
Great arch support
Wide and stable base
Breathable
Affordable
REASONS TO AVOID
Durability concerns
Heavy

The Merrell Moab 3 is a constant and reliable hiking shoe for those seeking performance at a reasonable price. The mesh and leather combination upper are comfortable out of the box, though we found that it took a few miles on the trail before hitting the sweet spot. The shoe is true to size and available for those seeking both regular and wide fits. The Super rebound compound midsole offers a ton of support, especially for those with high arches. Merrell also upgraded the outsole to a Vibram TC5 rubber that performed much better than its predecessors, thanks to a multi-directional lug pattern. Though this is not a waterproof shoe, we found it to be perfect for hot desert trails or low-elevation hikes when precipitation isn't in the forecast, as the lack of a waterproof liner helped increase the breathability and overall comfort of the shoe.

For those of you looking for lightweight performance, this shoe is not the best choice, as it weighs in with some of the heavier hiking shoes that we tested for this review. We attribute this additional weight to the beefy Vibram outsole that effectively protects every stride from debris along the trail, in addition to the excessive padding that surrounds the ankle collar. While we didn't experience any durability failures during our testing period, we can't help but question the mesh upper that could easily snag on technical terrain. The lacing attachments are also constructed from mesh and webbing, which doesn't inspire much confidence in their longevity. Overall, this shoe remains a consistent top performer, especially for those seeking a more affordable option for day hikes and backcountry overnights, and everything in between. If you're brand new to hiking and looking for some shoes to see whether or not you like the sport, we recommend the Columbia Crestwood – this model surprised us with its overall performance considering its notably low price.

Read more: Merrell Moab 3 review

The Merrell Moab 3 features a non-waterproof design for enhanced breathability in addition to a wide and stable base under foot.
Credit: Trish Matheny

Best Hiking Shoe Below $100


Columbia Crestwood - Women's


65
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort 7.5
  • Support 7.5
  • Traction 7.0
  • Water Resistance 3.0
  • Weight 6.8
  • Durability 6.5
Weight (per pair): 1.5 pounds | Lining: Omni-Tech
REASONS TO BUY
Highly affordable
Lightweight and flexible upper
Great traction
Available in regular and wide fits
Supportive without adding bulk
REASONS TO AVOID
Durability concerns
Not waterproof
Not recommended beyond well-maintained trails

The Columbia Crestwood is a lightweight and nimble hiking shoe that features a suede leather and mesh combination upper, which allows for out-of-the-box comfort and a flexible sneaker-like feel underfoot. The shoe runs true to size and is available for those with narrow and wide foot shapes. The design supplies just enough padding surrounding the ankle and the bellow tongue without adding a ton of bulk and weight below your feet. The Omni-grip rubber outsole performed well on most terrain types, though we found it to offer the most security on slippery boulders and polished rocks along the trail.

While this is not a waterproof design, we believe you can work that into your favor by selecting this shoe for its breathability rather than waterproof protection. The enhanced breathability is perfect for those day hikes in the desert or at low elevations during the hottest months of the year. While we didn't experience any issues regarding durability during our testing period, we can't imagine these shoes will last as long as their leather counterparts, especially with the flexible mesh upper and mesh lacing attachments. Overall, our testers were impressed with the performance of this shoe, which is available for a price that doesn't break the bank. If you have the funds to invest in a burlier pair of shoes, the La Sportiva Spire GTX is one of our all-time favorites.

Read more: Columbia Crestwood review

The Columbia Crestwood truly impressed our testing team, thanks to a great performance available at a highly affordable price.
Credit: Trish Matheny

Best for Slickrock


La Sportiva TX4 - Women's


78
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort 8.0
  • Support 9.0
  • Traction 9.0
  • Water Resistance 5.0
  • Weight 7.4
  • Durability 8.0
Weight (per pair): 1.42 pounds | Lining: Nonslip mesh
REASONS TO BUY
Top-of-the-line traction and grip
Very supportive
Breathable design
Comfortable for both wide and narrow feet
REASONS TO AVOID
Upper is not waterproof
Minor durability issues

The La Sportiva TX4 is more than just a shoe that's built for long and arduous climbing approaches. It's time to let hiking enthusiasts in on the secret to navigating slippery and polished rock on the most popular hiking trails. Featuring Vibram Megagrip Traverse rubber with an Impact Brake System, these shoes will provide the ultimate confidence underfoot. In addition to top-of-the-line traction, the TX4 offers a comfortable and supportive feel directly out of the box thanks to the STB Control System for torsional stability and a spacious fit in the forefoot.

Unfortunately, the TX4 is not fully waterproof, but it does perform well when moving through shallow stream crossings, mud puddles, and even melting snow patches. The nubuck leather upper features a very high-quality construction and can be treated with waterproof protection if desired, though it may affect the breathability. While we didn't experience any issues with our TX4s during our testing period, we couldn't help but notice other models on the trails wearing holes near the big and pinky toe and the tiny orange cord ripping out around the laces and the heel pull tab. Regardless, this quickly became our go-to hiking shoe for navigating slickrock trails from the slippery granite in Yosemite Valley to the polished sandstone in Zion National Park. If you know you'll be encountering some shallow creeks and puddles or maybe a little rain, the Salomon X Ultra 4 Gore-Tex is about as good as it gets in terms of water protection.

Read more: La Sportiva TX4 review

The TX4 will make you feel like a gecko as you dance up slippery rocks and polished trails.
Credit: Trish Matheny

Best for Versatile Performance


Salomon X Ultra 4 Gore-Tex - Women's


77
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort 7.0
  • Support 8.0
  • Traction 8.0
  • Water Resistance 9.0
  • Weight 6.5
  • Durability 8.0
Weight (per pair): 1.54 pounds | Lining: Gore-Tex
REASONS TO BUY
Excellent traction
Supportive midfoot design
Waterproof yet still breathable
Nimble and responsive
REASONS TO AVOID
Favors narrow feet
Limited adjustability
Less durable for some terrain

The Salomon X Ultra 4 Gore-Tex features excellent traction, a relatively lightweight design, and impressive midfoot stability. With a sleek, modern appearance and a snug, protective fit paired with a surprisingly solid base, it proves particularly well suited to technical backcountry terrain and mountaintop scrambles. The welded, synthetic upper does a great job of locking the forefoot and heel securely into place for stability from the bottom up. Meanwhile, the rubber Contagrip sole features a chevron lug pattern to enhance traction while navigating loose scree or wet and slippery rocks, and the Gore-Tex liners deliver watertight confidence during inclement weather. The X Ultra 4's toe box is also notably roomier than in previous iterations, making it spacious enough for those with a wider foot. Just keep in mind that the Salomon fit typically favors those with narrow feet and higher arches.

When it comes to agility and responsiveness on technical terrain, the X Ultra 4 makes a fantastic shoe, even if it isn't our go-to for multi-day expeditions while carrying a heavy pack. Perhaps our biggest complaint about this shoe is the Quicklace system — it's designed for convenience but ultimately prevents a customized fit and requires adjustments due to loosening on the trail. We also don't recommend this shoe if you plan on primarily traveling off trail, as the synthetic, welded upper isn't substantial enough to endure the impact from constant boulder-hopping over sharp rocks, talus, and scree. Still, these are an all-around, hard-charging option available at a reasonable price. If you know you have feet that are a little happier in wider shoes, the Hoka Anacapa 2 Low GTX is one of our favorites when it comes to comfort.

Read more: Salomon X Ultra 4 Gore-Tex review

Taking notes from the world of trail running, the X Ultra 4 is stable, highly water resistant, and one of the most versatile of the bunch.
Credit: Trish Matheny

Most Comfortable


Hoka Anacapa 2 Low GTX - Women's


77
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort 9.0
  • Support 8.0
  • Traction 8.0
  • Water Resistance 7.0
  • Weight 6.6
  • Durability 6.0
Weight (per pair): 1.52 pounds | Lining: Gore-Tex Invisible Fit membranes
REASONS TO BUY
Solid traction
Great shock absorption
Breathable waterproof performance
Well-cushioned sole
REASONS TO AVOID
Expensive
Runs a bit large
Toe box favors narrow feet
Lacks durability of a traditional leather hiker

The Hoka Anacapa 2 Low GTX is a lightweight and uniquely engineered hiking shoe that prioritizes all-day comfort through a thickly-cushioned sole that helps to propel you forward with every step on the trail. The recycled mesh upper also contributes to overall comfort by releasing moisture that's built up during those hard-earned trail miles, as well as protecting the feet during stream crossings with exceptional Gore-Tex Invisible Fit technology. The Vibram Megagrip outsole performed well, whether our team was navigating the steeps or cautiously hiking on slippery boulders found on popular trail systems.

Though these shoes are designed with neutral stability in mind, we found that adding an aftermarket insole enhanced arch support for those who need or prefer it. We would also like to recommend engaging the extra runner's loop eyelet near the ankle, which will help to lock your heel into place, especially on steep and demanding trails. The sole of the Anacapa is comprised of a lightweight, soft rubber and a high-performing Vibram Megagrip rubber. Unfortunately, we noted that the softer rubber can be impacted when navigating scree fields and burlier terrain. Still, these hiking shoes impressed our testing team thanks to their standout comfort, breathable waterproof capabilities, and solid traction whether you're headed out for a multi-day backpacking trip or a short weekend stroll. If you can sacrifice a bit of comfort for streamlined weight and better durability, the The North Face VECTIV Fastpack FUTURELIGHT is built for speed.

Read more: Hoka Anacapa 2 Low GTX review

We love the padded sole and great cushioning on the Anacapa 2.
Credit: Trish Matheny

Best for Speed


The North Face VECTIV Fastpack FUTURELIGHT - Women's


76
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort 8.0
  • Support 8.0
  • Traction 6.0
  • Water Resistance 8.0
  • Weight 8.0
  • Durability 7.0
Weight (per pair): 1.34 pounds | Lining: FUTURELIGHT waterproof membrane
REASONS TO BUY
Affordable
Versatile
Breathable
Fully waterproof design
REASONS TO AVOID
Toe box is narrow
Sizing runs small
Mesh upper lacks durability equivalent to leather

The North Face VECTIV Fastpack FUTURELIGHT is our favorite hiking shoe to recommend for those seeking to drop the added weight and bulk of a traditional hiking shoe without sacrificing high performance. This shoe features a moderate cushion and a unique rockered design that feels comfortable right out of the box and centers around maximizing energy output on the trails. The fully waterproof design allows space for air to permeate the abrasion-resistant mesh upper and increase overall breathability without losing any waterproof performance.

This high-performing shoe is not without some caveats. While we appreciate the reduced weight and bulk, we also can't imagine this shoe will offer the same durability as other more substantial, heavier synthetic and leather uppers. While we love this lightweight design for day hikes and fastpacking missions, it wouldn't be our first choice for an extended backpacking trip with any significant weight on our backs. All that said, if you're looking to shed some weight without losing torsional stability and waterproof performance, this is a shoe that will maximize forward motion without slowing you down. For those that are heading to redrock country (like a lot of us are), we've found that the La Sportiva TX4 is by far and away the best option for sandstone.

Read more: The North Face VECTIV Fastpack FUTURELIGHT review

This lightweight shoe also boasts reinforced lacing through the upper, helping to lock in a secure fit.
Credit: Trish Matheny

Compare Products

select up to 5 products to compare
Score Product Price
79
La Sportiva Spire GTX - Women's
Best Overall Women's Hiking Shoe
$209
Editors' Choice Award
78
La Sportiva TX4 - Women's
Best for Slickrock
$159
Top Pick Award
77
Salomon X Ultra 4 Gore-Tex - Women's
Best for Versatile Performance
$160
Top Pick Award
77
Hoka Anacapa 2 Low GTX - Women's
Most Comfortable
$180
Top Pick Award
76
The North Face VECTIV Fastpack FUTURELIGHT - Women's
Best for Speed
$149
Top Pick Award
73
On Running Cloudwander Waterproof - Women's
$180
72
Altra LP Alpine - Women's
$160
70
Oboz Sawtooth X Low Waterproof - Women's
$165
68
Merrell Moab 3 - Women's
Best Bang for the Buck
$120
Best Buy Award
66
Merrell Moab 3 WP - Women's
$140
66
Keen Targhee III Low - Women's
$155
65
Columbia Crestwood - Women's
Best Hiking Shoe Below $100
$70
Best Buy Award
65
Keen Zionic Speed - Women's
$145
63
Adidas Terrex Swift R3 Gore-Tex - Women's
$160
62
Danner Trail 2650 - Women's
$170
61
Merrell Siren Edge 3 - Women's
$110
59
Merrell Moab Speed - Women's
$130
49
Nortiv 8 Lightweight - Women's
$83

hiking shoes womens - testers logged many miles to hone in on the very best hiking shoe...
Testers logged many miles to hone in on the very best hiking shoe options for every kind of adventurer.
Credit: Myrha Colt

How We Test Hiking Shoes


Before testing begins, we research a wide variety of available options. After scouring the market and vetting many manufacturers and models, we purchased all the shoes in this review at retail price. Our selection includes models that we consider to be the most promising, innovative, intriguing, and of high value. We then test our selected models for months, hiking many miles in each pair, sometimes under heavy packs. We assess their comfort and how suitable each shoe is for different foot shapes, noting adjustment points like laces and tongues. We evaluate arch and lateral structures for support and test traction on a variety of surfaces, from rock slabs and wet logs to sandy trails and mud. We test out their water resistance by submerging them in several inches of water for five minutes, as well as flowing streams. For more on our testing process, see our How We Test article.

Women's hiking shoes were tested across 6 performance metrics:
  • Comfort (25% of overall score weighting)
  • Support (20% weighting)
  • Traction (15% weighting)
  • Water Resistance (15% weighting)
  • Weight (15% weighting)
  • Durability (10% weighting)

Why Trust GearLab


Comfort and support tests are the two most important metrics we investigated, and together, they make up nearly half of the total weighted score. We wore each pair of hikers in various terrains, from soft trails in the forest to scree-covered buttes and scrambles over slippery granite. We assessed support while traveling light and while wearing a heavier pack, checked traction by wearing them back-to-back on dry and technical scrambles, and carefully evaluated all of their positive and negative attributes along the way. Since 2012, we've tested over 50 unique hiking shoes for women, giving us insight to better evaluate the performance of each and every shoe.

Rock hopping to test the stability of the La Sportiva Spire GTX.
Credit: Trish Matheny

Our review team is headed up by a team of strong women with decades of hiking experience. Our lead tester is Trish Matheny, an avid climber, splitboarder, ultra runner, and gear junkie. Pick a day, and Trish is on the move, probably testing gear. She is backed up by Myrha Colt, a long-time adventure travel professional and trail enthusiast whose feet have carried her from the rugged backcountry trails of the US West to dramatic heights and dusty roads in trekking hot spots worldwide. Also contributing to this dynamic team is long-time climber, backpacker, and all-around outdoor gear expert Mary Witlacil. These three backcountry connoisseurs are well-versed in assessing the features that make a great trail shoe while calling out the hiking shoes that may miss the mark. So it is with great enthusiasm they bring you their final, well-vetted assessments.

Mountain hiking involves a lot of rock and we put our test suite of...
Mountain hiking involves a lot of rock and we put our test suite of hikers through the wringer to see which could hang and which left us wanting more.
From steep and rocky to mucky and slick, we've tested these hikers over every type of terrain.

Analysis and Test Results


Following our testing period, we scored each pair of hiking shoes on specific criteria so you can find the best shoes for your needs. Read on to learn more about each metric and which shoes rose to the top.


Value


Hiking is, at its core, a pretty basic activity that requires much less gear than most other outdoor activities. That being said, a good pair of hiking shoes tailored to your specific outdoor objectives is essential and can make all the difference in enjoying your experience. Back in the day, you could buy one pair of leather hiking boots that would last a decade or two. Given the lighter weight and high-performing materials of today's styles, many new hiking shoes may last only a fraction of that lifespan. There's no doubt modern hikers benefit from innovative design and advanced technologies. But people who hit the trail often are apt to blow through one or two (or even more!) pairs each year. Though the hiking shoes in this review may not be outrageously expensive, costs add up if you're replacing your trail shoes often. We offer opinions on the value of each shoe based on the metrics below, but to a certain extent, any final assessment will depend on two things: your hiking priorities and your specific fit.

hiking shoes womens - the columbia crestwood impressed our testing team with excellent...
The Columbia Crestwood impressed our testing team with excellent performance on well-maintained trails, offering high value for an affordable price.
Credit: Gus Landefeld

The Columbia Crestwood provides a ton of performance in exchange in exchange for a modest price tag. The mesh and leather combination upper offers a flexible, sneaker-like feel directly out of the box while also offering the stability and support you'd expect from a hiking shoe. Though not a waterproof design, our testers appreciated the enhanced breathability that was perfect for hot and dry days on the trail. The Merrell Moab 3 is another great choice for those seeking value in exchange for their investment. The Moab 3 is also a more breathable, non-waterproof option, yet offers more support for those with high arches, along with a beefy Vibram outsole for more protection on the trail. When you need to move quickly to achieve your objectives, the The North Face VECTIV Fastpack FUTURELIGHT is an excellent, well-priced option that will impress you with its rockered design that optimizes forward motion. While the Merrell Siren Edge 3 wasn't a top performer (nor is it waterproof), it is one of the least expensive and lightest-weight shoes in our review. It provides reasonable comfort out on the trail with better breathability than hiking shoes that feature a waterproof membrane. The Siren is also available in a waterproof version. The Nortiv 8 Lightweight was the most affordable shoe that we've tested so far and proves that you truly get what you pay for. This shoe features a minimalist design that offers limited trail protection and durability.

One tip for finding value in hiking shoes is to consider your need for waterproof technology. Many of the models in this review are available in non-waterproof versions, which tend to be lighter in weight and less expensive than their waterproof counterparts. As a bonus, non-lined shoes almost always have better breathability, which is particularly great for warm-weather hiking at lower elevations.

hiking shoes womens - the vectiv fastpack from the north face is a trail running/hiking...
The VECTIV Fastpack from The North Face is a trail running/hiking shoe hybrid with a rockered design for maximizing forward motion.
Credit: Trish Matheny

Comfort


It is difficult to overstate the importance of comfort when considering hiking footwear. Your feet are your foundation on the trail, navigating roots, rocks, and rugged terrain, so it is essential to have cushioned and comfortable shoes, especially with the weight of a pack. Even a short hike can be unpleasant in an uncomfortable shoe, let alone a weeklong thru-hike in remote mountains. It's hard to take in views when all you can think about are hotspots and blisters on your toes.


Comfortable shoes are strategically padded, responsive, supportive, and sized correctly. Of course, a good fit is essential and highly subjective, as a shoe that fits one person's long and narrow foot might not feel so great to someone with a wider forefoot. So, we highly recommend test-driving any potential candidates before committing to your purchase. If the fit is too loose or too tight, you'll end up with pressure points, chafing, and, worst of all, blisters. In this section, we'll identify which shoes will work best for various foot shapes and arch heights, as the overall fit significantly influences comfort. If you think you've found the perfect shoe but discover it didn't break in as well as you had hoped, consider swapping out the insole it came with for some aftermarket insoles, tongue pads, or different shoelaces.

hiking shoes womens - changing from ski boots into the comfort of the salomon x ultra 4.
Changing from ski boots into the comfort of the Salomon X Ultra 4.
Credit: Trish Matheny

Our testers discovered three very different standout options when evaluating each shoe for comfort — the Anacapa 2 Low GTX, the Altra LP Alpine, and the On Running Cloudwander. While the Anacapa 2 and Cloudwander both offer ample and unique cushioning combined with substantial structure and support, our testing team ultimately preferred the thickly-cushioned Anacapa 2 above all. The LP Alpine features distinctive comfort through its spacious toe box and Balanced Cushioning that encourages your body's natural alignment by placing the heel and forefoot at the same height.

The Anacapa 2 features a thickly-cushioned sole in addition to...
The Anacapa 2 features a thickly-cushioned sole in addition to padding that surrounds the ankle for added comfort without sacrificing breathability.
The CloudTec cushioning on the Cloundwander doesn&#039;t disappoint but...
The CloudTec cushioning on the Cloundwander doesn't disappoint but the fit favors those with a narrow foot.
The Cloudwander and Anacapa 2 both provide substantial cushioning and support underfoot.

One telltale sign of a comfortable shoe is the amount of fatigue and soreness you feel in your feet at the end of the day. Though the La Sportiva Spire GTX is not the most cushioned option, it has a responsive and dynamic midsole and excellent support that performs particularly well on technical, off-trail terrain. While the abrasion-resistant mesh upper could be considered too spacious for some, a set of Superfeet insoles could be a great way to add cushioning and achieve a near-perfect fit. The Salomon X Ultra 4 also features flexible, soft materials and supportive technical overlays, which combine to make a remarkably agile and comfortable shoe. And finally, we'd be remiss not to mention the VECTIV Fastpack for its moderate cushioning, flexible forefoot, and rockered design that increases comfort without weighing you down on the trail.

hiking shoes womens - we love the la sportiva spire for short hikes and overnight trips...
We love the La Sportiva Spire for short hikes and overnight trips alike.
Credit: Trish Matheny

Leather shoes can sometimes require a few miles to break in, as the material needs to be worked to conform to your foot. Conversely, shoes made with synthetic materials tend to be more comfortable out of the box, with the laces establishing a more individualized fit. Despite being leather, the La Sportiva TX4 impressed our testing team after it quickly molded to our feet and provided a comfortable fit and a secure heel right out of the box. The design hugs your foot and imparts confidence with every step. We found a stiffer material, like that of the Adidas Terrex Swift R3, which will certainly require quite a few hikes to soften up and increase responsiveness. We highly recommend slowly increasing your mileage while breaking in any new shoe rather than heading out for a demanding hike. This will give you time to dial in the lacing and adjustments you'll need to maximize the comfort of the shoe and hopefully prevent any development of blisters or hot spots before committing to a longer hike.

hiking shoes womens - the tx4 has a rand that wraps around the base of the shoe that...
The TX4 has a rand that wraps around the base of the shoe that protects the foot from sharp sticks or rocks.
Credit: Trish Matheny

There is great variation across shoe brands when it comes to width, length, and shape. While we evaluate whether each shoe will work best for a narrow or wide foot, keep in mind that some models like the Oboz Sawtooth X Low, Merrell Siren Edge 3, the Merrell Moab 3 WP, the Merrell Moab 3, the Columbia Crestwood, and the Nortiv 8 Lightweight also come in wide sizes. If you prefer more width in your hiking shoe, these models are worth considering.

Size conversion is not always consistent between US and European shoe brands, so double-checking the sizing is always good. US Women's shoes convert to a range of Euro sizes, but only the La Sportiva Spire and the Hoka Anacapa 2 Low run noticeably longer and more narrow than the rest of our test group. Additionally, we found the sizing for the VECTIV Fastpack FUTURELIGHT, the Merrell Moab Speed, and the Cloudwander to run small and feature narrow toe boxes that could potentially be problematic for those with wider feet. Otherwise, sizing differences were not enough of an issue to demand note, but it is something to keep in mind if you run between sizes. And, of course, no matter what sizing standard is at play, many hikers prefer to buy half a size larger to ensure a bit of extra room up front for swollen feet after miles on the trail.

hiking shoes womens - the merrell moab 3 features a comfortable design direct from the...
The Merrell Moab 3 features a comfortable design direct from the box, though after a few miles on the trail, they hit their sweet spot, providing a more customized fit for those with both wide and narrow feet.
Credit: Gus Landefeld

Support


When evaluating the overall support of a hiking shoe, we consider the arch support, lateral stability, overall stiffness of the sole, and the effectiveness and adjustability of the lacing system. We examined each feature and evaluated the different shoes side-by-side, noting how they performed relative to one another. It's important to understand that ankle-high hiking shoes simply do not offer the same amount of support as a full boot with an ankle cuff for additional stability. If you prefer more ankle support while exploring uneven terrain or you plan to hike with a heavy pack over long distances, we highly recommend a full hiking boot (often referred to as “mid” height).


The shape of your foot will often determine the amount of arch support you prefer your hiking shoe to have built into its structure. If you have flatter feet and put on a shoe with pronounced arch support, it's not going to offer stability or comfort. Conversely, little to no arch support in a shoe can feel brutal to someone with medium to high arches, especially after hiking all day. If you love every other feature of a specific hiking shoe but are after more support for your arches, it is possible to replace the insole of the shoe with an aftermarket insole that better suits the shape of your feet and provides a more customized fit.

The Keen is a tough, sturdy shoe but its slim insert is not quite...
The Keen is a tough, sturdy shoe but its slim insert is not quite enough to soften the ride in this hard-based shoe. We recommend adding aftermarket inserts to improve the experience over long distances.
The latest version of this shoe features a substantial insert that...
The latest version of this shoe features a substantial insert that was rigid enough to provide support for those with higher arches.
Most hiking shoe insoles are minimal at best, though some do provide enhanced support for those with high arches.

Out of all the shoes we tested, the La Sportiva Spire, La Sportiva TX4, Salomon X Ultra 4, and the On Running Cloudwander offered the most support for moderate to high arches. The proprietary insole in the Cloudwander provides the most support of the bunch, with extra padding and a molded arch that holds its shape well. Those who prefer more neutral support may want to consider the Hoka Anacapa 2 Low, the Altra LP Alpine, or the Keen Zionic Speed, which have less pronounced arches.

hiking shoes womens - the on running cloudwander features one of the thickest and most...
The On Running Cloudwander features one of the thickest and most supportive insoles that we tested.
Credit: Trish Matheny


Lateral stability is also a crucial consideration for your next trail shoe, especially since hiking rarely happens on flat terrain free of obstacles. Such stability is a combination of internal arch support and a sole's flexibility and firmness, which comes into play when you are boulder-hopping, scrambling, or hiking over mixed terrain through rugged trail systems. Whenever you can wring out a shoe like a wet towel, that shoe's lateral structure will leave a lot to be desired. However, the more stiffness you add, the less flexibility you'll find in the forefoot, and the shoe can become less suitable for tackling steep inclines. On the flip side, too much flexibility under the balls of your feet means you will absorb more shock from the trail and fatigue your feet more quickly. So, your hiking plans will likely dictate your priorities.

hiking shoes womens - the spire is impressively stable and supportive.
The Spire is impressively stable and supportive.
Credit: Myrha Colt

One of the best mixes of support and mild forefoot flexibility we saw was in the La Sportiva TX4. On technical hikes and scrambling for summits, it offered protection underfoot and solid stability with limited motion side-to-side. For longer hikes through any type of terrain, the sturdy base of the La Sportiva Spire GTX makes an excellent choice. Or if miles of uphill climbs lie ahead, the Salomon X Ultra 4 impressed us with ample flexibility at the ball of the foot coupled with ankle and pronation support via overlays on the outside of the upper.

hiking shoes womens - the tx4 offers great support and stability, even for long hikes or...
The TX4 offers great support and stability, even for long hikes or backpacking trips through technical terrain.
Credit: Trish Matheny

A key feature for ensuring stability is to have your heel secured in place. An extra runner's loop eyelet on shoes like the Oboz Sawtooth X, Adidas Terrex Swift R3, Keen Zionic Speed, and the Anacapa 2 Low allows for alternative lacing strategies to create a snug fit and minimize heel lift. It's important to consider that even the slightest amount of movement in the heel over the course of an all-day hike can be a recipe for severe blisters and discomfort, so we highly recommend finding a shoe with the best fit for your feet. We recommend reversing the final lace on shoes like the Merrell Moab 3 and the Columbia Crestwood, which helped to lock the heel into place while also placing less torque on the mesh lacing attachments.

hiking shoes womens - the merrell moab 3 design features a super rebound compound midsole...
The Merrell Moab 3 design features a super rebound compound midsole that provides excellent support for those with high arches, while the lacing system allows for a snug and supportive fit around the ankle collar.
Credit: Gus Landefeld


Traction


Traction is a critical consideration for any footwear designed for the trail. Slick feet could land you on your rear end, contribute to twisted ankles, and severely limit the terrain you feel confident exploring. Several things contribute to a shoe's traction, including the stickiness of the rubber as well as the size, shape, direction, and depth of the lug pattern on the outsole. Vibram soles are the gold standard for high-end hiking shoes; they make dozens of different rubber compounds and tread patterns with varying degrees of surface grip.


Our overall favorite shoe for navigating slick rock terrain is the La Sportiva TX4, which features a Vibram Megagrip Traverse with a TrailBite Heel Braking platform below the heel. This shoe is well-known by rock climbers who primarily navigate steep and unforgiving terrain on the approach to their favorite climbing routes. However, we also found this “approach” shoe to perform well when evaluated on hiking trails, especially when navigating slippery, polished, and super popular trail systems in America's National Parks.

Offering fantastic traction with every step, this is our favorite shoe for navigating slippery and technical terrain.
Credit: Trish Matheny

Other notable performers include the La Sportiva Spire GTX, which features a Vibram XS Trek outsole and an Impact Brake System positioned on the heel for additional grip and traction while quickly descending technical terrain. This rubber also performed exceptionally well in cold, wet conditions, where we've seen other softer rubbers lose traction once the temperatures dropped. We'd also like to give a shout-out to the Hoka Anacapa 2 Low GTX but with an asterisk. The sole is comprised of two separate rubbers, and in our case, the light purple rubber represented the durable, high-performing Vibram Megagrip rubber, while the lighter soft-sole rubber was very susceptible to durability issues while moving through challenging and rocky terrain.

hiking shoes womens - burly vibram xs trek gets the done job on all types of terrain.
Burly Vibram XS Trek gets the done job on all types of terrain.
Credit: Trish Matheny

We primarily evaluated traction on steep and unconsolidated dirt trails littered with decomposing granite, in addition to slippery slabs, roots, wet logs and boulders, mud, loose scree, melting snow, and talus fields. Above-average traction on dirt is usually achieved through a deep lug pattern that can dig into the ground with every step. We found shoes that feature outsoles with “multi-directional” chevron lug patterns that look like zigzags or arrow tips to provide the highest-performing traction. This optimal traction allowed us to tackle the steeps without losing confidence in our footwork. Notable pairs include the Salomon X Ultra 4 and the Altra LP Alpine, which feature a chevron pattern with a very different feel underfoot. Though none of these outsoles are equipped for tons of off-trail terrain, the LP Alpine boasts more flexibility and control thanks to the Duratread rubber and Trailclaw patterning, while the X Ultra 4 offers exceptional grip even on icy terrain without being overly rigid. The Omni-Grip rubber outsole on the Columbia Crestwood offers a multi-directional lug pattern along with a flexible, sneaker-like upper that grips the best on slippery rocks and boulders.

hiking shoes womens - the columbia crestwood supplies an omni-grip rubber outsole that...
The Columbia Crestwood supplies an Omni-Grip rubber outsole that performs well on most terrain types, but is most effective on slippery terrain like polished rocks and boulders along the trail.
Credit: Gus Landefeld

When it comes to traction on rock, the greatest impact comes from the stickiness of the rubber rather than the shape of the lugs. Hard and stiff rubber doesn't grip as well as softer and more pliable formulations. The La Sportiva TX4, Terrex Swift R3, Altra LP Alpine, and the Salomon X Ultra 4 performed particularly well on rock that lacked texture due to their flexible and grippy outsoles. Though various types of rubber, these outsoles remained soft, flexible, and sticky, thereby increasing our confidence as we leaped from boulder to boulder and scrambled over polished slabs. Of course, the temperature can affect stickiness, and soft rubber typically does not perform as well in colder conditions. Therefore, in colder conditions, we recommend the Spire GTX, which is outfitted with a Vibram XS Trek outsole, giving high performance while maintaining flexibility on cold, icy, and wet surfaces.

hiking shoes womens - the flexible and grippy outsoles of the continental rubber on the...
The flexible and grippy outsoles of the Continental rubber on the Adidas Terrex helped us trust our feet when moving through technical terrain.
Credit: Trish Matheny


The flexibility of the forefoot will also affect traction. If you can't bend the front of your foot or the sole is too thick to feel the rock, you may have difficulty achieving secure footing. The X Ultra 4 and the Spire GTX both hit that sweet spot between forefoot flexion and stability to prove themselves as great options for navigating technical descents and steep climbs.

hiking shoes womens - the supportive x ultra 4 allows for ample flexion in the forefoot so...
The supportive X Ultra 4 allows for ample flexion in the forefoot so as to prevent rigidity and increase responsiveness on the trail.
Credit: Trish Matheny

Water Resistance


Many hiking shoes are available in both waterproof and non-waterproof versions. The best option for you depends on the climate, terrain, elevation, and the season where you plan to do most of your hiking. Do you live in the desert and avoid hiking in the rain? Are your hikes primarily shorter and closer to home? You may want to pass on the less breathable Gore-Tex membrane and opt for a pair with a mesh lining instead. However, most hiking destinations have unpredictable weather, and an afternoon rainstorm far from the trailhead can make for a soggy, uncomfortable, and even painful hike.


Waterproof membrane technology is always improving, allowing shoes to transfer heat and sweat away from your feet and out of the shoe. Even as the technology becomes more breathable, a membrane will invariably be less breathable than a shoe without this lining. The best mix of breathability and waterproof protection in our current lineup is the Spire GTX, which is designed with a Gore-Tex Surround liner that increases ventilation through the bottom of the shoe with open channels in the sole. Other breathable waterproof options include the VECTIV Fastpack and the On Running Cloudwander, whose designs feature performance mesh and waterproof membranes that maximize water resistance without sacrificing overall breathability, thereby making them better options for hikes during the heat of the summer at lower elevations.

The TNF VECTIV Fastpack shoes were a great companion on wet outings.
Credit: Trish Matheny

If you live in a wet climate or like to plan trips into the mountains, a waterproof shoe is typically a necessity. Most of the models in our current test suite claim such protections, but we also included a few non-waterproof models for comparison. To determine the level of water resistance each offers, we performed various trail tests, including stream crossings and a controlled submersion test (5 minutes submerged in 3 inches of water) with each shoe. We were immediately impressed by the performance of modern waterproof technology, noting that each shoe advertised as waterproof could back up its claim in practice, holding strong against any outside moisture to keep our toes warm and dry.

The Anacapa scored well in our water resistance tests and managed to remain breathable at the same time.
Credit: Trish Matheny

Other excellent options that offer waterproof performance but lack some breathability include the Salomon X Ultra 4 GTX, Adidas Terrex Swift R3, and the Oboz Sawtooth X Low. Though the X Ultra 4 offers excellent waterproof protection, we found the design to run hot, causing our feet to sweat and swell in warmer climates. On the flip side, we appreciated this design feature when some of our early hikes required post-holing through knee-deep snow and crossing several cold creeks filled with recent snowmelt. The Terrex Swift R3 is perfectly watertight and makes an excellent choice for those cold and wet days on the trail, though our feet got rather toasty while hiking during the warmest days of the season.

The X Ultra 4 proved its waterproof claims in our tests. However, the Gore-Tex waterproofing means the shoe is less breathable, which can cause hot feet in warm weather.
Credit: Trish Matheny

In comparison, each of our mesh-lined shoes lasted less than 60 seconds in our submersion test, with the Merrell Siren Edge, Danner Trail 2650, Keen Zionic Speed, Altra LP Alpine, Columbia Crestwood, Merrell Moab 3, and Nortiv 8 Lightweight immediately soaking through and absorbing a significant amount of water. Among them, the Siren Edge was the fastest to dry by a long shot. So, if waterproofing is not a top priority but breathability is, this could be a great option to regulate sweat and foot temperature while still drying quickly in the event of an unexpected storm. It is also available in a waterproof version if you love the fit but require moisture protection. Not to be missed, the La Sportiva TX4 features a nubuck leather upper that can withstand some moisture on the trail, though it cannot be fully submerged when crossing creeks. There is an option to treat this leather with a waterproof coating for added performance while remaining mindful that the treatment may reduce overall breathability.

hiking shoes womens - though not entirely waterproof, the tx4 kept our feet dry in snow...
Though not entirely waterproof, the TX4 kept our feet dry in snow patches and puddles.
Credit: Trish Matheny

Weight


Light hiking gear can often lead to a more enjoyable experience on the trail, and hiking shoe technology has now advanced to the point where hikers are almost as light as trail running shoes without sacrificing protection, stability, or performance. Though less than half a pound separates our testing group's heaviest and lightest pairs, this extra weight can make quite a difference, especially when carrying a heavy pack or increasing overall mileage. It's important to consider that some of the lightest shoes that we tested also delivered the least performance.


Some examples of shoes that offer a lightweight design and limited performance are the Keen Zionic Speed and the Merrell Moab Speed. For a little extra weight, we found shoes that combined the agility of a trail runner with the stability of a hiking boot to offer the best performance. For instance, the VECTIV Fastpack only weighed 1.34 pounds per pair yet offered excellent comfort, support, and waterproof protection. The La Sportiva TX4 weighs only 1.42 pounds per pair yet provides incredible stability and traction within a comfortable and supportive structure. The On Running Cloudwander and the Salomon X Ultra 4 both weigh only 1.54 pounds, and though not as durable as their nubuck leather counterparts, they still remain appropriate and responsive for navigating technical terrain.

hiking shoes womens - weighing only 1.34 pounds, the vectiv is one of the lightest shoes...
Weighing only 1.34 pounds, the Vectiv is one of the lightest shoes that we tested that didn't sacrifice performance while reducing overall weight.
Credit: Trish Matheny

Moving to the middle of the pack, the La Sportiva Spire GTX weighs in at 1.68 pounds. The synthetic upper remains flexible while also offering high performance in both traction and waterproof protection. The extra weight is worth the trade-off for the additional features and stability that allow this shoe to navigate off-trail while carrying a pack.

hiking shoes womens - the spire&#039;s waterproof material and sturdy sole weighed in at 1.68...
The Spire's waterproof material and sturdy sole weighed in at 1.68 pounds for a women's US size 8.5.
Credit: Trish Matheny

The heaviest shoes that we tested included the Merrell Moab 3 WP, the Merrell Moab 3, the Keen Targhee III Low, and the Oboz Sawtooth X Low Waterproof, weighing between 1.78 and 1.92 pounds per pair. Though only a few ounces heavier than our lightest contenders, the designs feature bulky leather construction with additional volume that makes for a heavier feel on the trails. It is also worth mentioning that the added weight for these hiking shoes means increased durability and a long-lasting, if heavy, design.

hiking shoes womens - hiking shoes that feature beefy outsoles, like the merrell moab 3...
Hiking shoes that feature beefy outsoles, like the Merrell Moab 3, often sacrifice lightweight designs in exchange for additional support and protection along the trail.
Credit: Gus Landefeld

Durability


Hiking shoes are the buffer between you and the rough, rugged, or abrasive terrain you encounter on the trail, so it's no surprise that they may wear out faster than the rest of your hiking gear. A typical shoe with a soft EVA midsole lasts between 300-500 miles, depending on its structure, as well as where you hike, how you walk, and how much weight you carry. If you are a casual hiker, it might take years before your shoes begin to break down. Ambitious hikers, however, may go through one or more pairs per year. Shoes with a polyurethane (PU) midsole are expected to last up to twice the mileage; however, that extra durability can come at the expense of comfort and an extended break-in period. Normal wear and tear on any shoe packs down the midsole and wears down the outsole, so stiffer midsoles (like a dual-density EVA) and dense rubber soles will last longer overall.


While time does not allow us to put 500 miles on every shoe in this review, each pair was still worn extensively on various terrains. We closely inspected them for damage, areas of potential weakness, or premature wear and compression. In an effort to make shoes lighter weight, some midsoles are left almost entirely exposed. Since that material is softer than rubber, it is more prone to snagging on vegetation, tearing, or even pulling away from the upper. If you hike in very brushy terrain, you may see more of this kind of damage than if you are out on desert slabs or well-maintained trail systems.

hiking shoes womens - though the vibram megagrip sole of the anacapa 2 provides confidence...
Though the Vibram Megagrip sole of the Anacapa 2 provides confidence with every step, the softer rubber mixed into the outsole is easily impacted by sharp rocks encountered on the trail.
Credit: Trish Matheny


In addition to the soles, we look closely at the uppers. Leather tends to have the greatest longevity, especially when it is double-stitched. Synthetic materials are lighter and more breathable than leather, but our experience shows that they are more vulnerable to tearing or cracking after encountering debris on the trail. We closely inspect seams, eyelets, toe boxes, and pressure points for any indication of failure, delamination, or wear. The abrasion-resistant mesh of the Spire GTX is supplemented with a polyurethane toe cap and a “heel-surround” for added durability. Some models have welded overlays made of thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), which adds durability while being lighter than rubber. It protects from abrasion but will not provide as much protection from rocks, roots, or other potential toe-stubbing hazards.

hiking shoes womens - the spire&#039;s tpu toe cap and abrasion resistance mesh help increase...
The Spire's TPU toe cap and abrasion resistance mesh help increase its durability and protect your feet on the trail.
Credit: Trish Matheny

The La Sportiva TX4, Oboz Sawtooth X Low Waterproof, and Keen Targhee III Low all impressed our testers thanks to their durable leather uppers and mesh inserts to improve breathability. Double or triple-stitched seams gave no indication of pulling or unraveling throughout our testing period. These shoes are burly, and the insoles are solid, thereby increasing the life of the footbed. All of these shoes are designed to handle long-distance hikes, and we expect them to offer long-lasting performance. That being said, though leather uppers will offer a better return on your investment in terms of longevity, the design may include additional weight and bulk.

hiking shoes womens - the oboz sawtooth is built to last, featuring a heavyweight leather...
The Oboz Sawtooth is built to last, featuring a heavyweight leather design that will perform for many miles on the trail.
Credit: Trish Matheny

Conclusion


Many innovative and exciting technologies are being used to design hiking shoes these days, making them lighter and more responsive without sacrificing support, stability, or waterproof performance. However, it can require many miles to test new features and models with any depth. We hope this review helps you to narrow down your selection so that you find the right hiking shoe for your upcoming adventure, whether exploring local trails or planning a once-in-a-lifetime trip.

hiking shoes womens - we hope our evaluations will help you select the best hiking shoe...
We hope our evaluations will help you select the best hiking shoe for your next adventure.
Credit: Trish Matheny

Myrha Colt, Trish Matheny, and Mary Witlacil