Best Daypacks For Women

Looking for a new women's daypack but not sure which is right for you? We researched 75 different ones and tested 9 to help you find the best one for your needs. We put these packs to the test in our side-by-side process over three months, hiking dozens of miles and using them for a variety of activities. We then took a close look at how comfortable they were, hiking with each pack over many miles and with a considerable load. We also closely examine all of the different features available to give our recommendations on which "bells and whistles" are useful and which will just get in the way. Then we tried these bags on women with a variety of different sizes and shapes, to get a good sense of how adjustable each model was. We got to know these packs inside and out, and we've picked our favorites for all different kinds of hiking and other activities.

Read the full review below >

Test Results and Ratings

Displaying 1 - 5 of 9 ≪ Previous | View All | Next ≫
Rank #1 #2 #3 #4 #5
Product
CamelBak Sequoia 22
CamelBak Sequoia 22
Osprey Sirrus 24
Osprey Sirrus 24
Osprey Tempest 20
Osprey Tempest 20
The North Face Aleia 22U
The North Face Aleia 22
REI Co-op Trail 25
REI Co-op Trail 25 - Women's
Awards  Editors' Choice Award    Top Pick Award    Best Buy Award 
Price $100.93 at REI
Compare at 3 sellers
$130.00 at REI
Compare at 5 sellers
$106.70 at Amazon
Compare at 5 sellers
$74.93 at Backcountry
Compare at 3 sellers
$69.95 at REI
Overall Score 
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Pros Comfortable, lots of good features, water reservoir includedComfortable, well-ventilated, adjustable torso length, included rain coverLightweight, lots of features, helmet attachmentLightweight, two sizes available, good ventilationInexpensive, lightweight, included rain cover
Cons On the heavy side, expensiveHeavy, ill-fitting hipbeltFit runs small, hard to adjust, doesn't carry muchMinimal features, some durability concernsHipbelt is only a strap, poor ventilation, lots of dangling straps
Ratings by Category Sequoia 22 Sirrus 24 Tempest 20 Aleia 22 Co-op Trail 25 - Women's
Comfort - 30%
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9
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6
Features - 30%
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8
Weight - 20%
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9
Adjustability - 10%
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Durability - 10%
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Specs Sequoia 22 Sirrus 24 Tempest 20 Aleia 22 Co-op Trail 25 - Women's
Weight (oz) 35 41 26 25 25
Volume/Capacity (liters) 19 24 20 22 25
Back Construction Ventilated back panel with molded pods Ventilated tensioned mesh AirScape backpanel - accordion spread mesh-covered foam ridges Trampoline-style suspended mesh back panel with contoured Atilon sheet Padded, mesh covered

Analysis and Award Winners


Review by:
Cam McKenzie Ring
Senior Review Editor
OutdoorGearLab

Last Updated:
Monday
August 28, 2017

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Best Pack Overall


CamelBak Sequoia 22


CamelBak Sequoia 22 Editors' Choice Award


Excellent comfort
Roomy interior
Water reservoir included
Great feature set
Most expensive pack in our review
Heavy
If you're a heavy packer, thirsty hiker, or are looking for one of the plushest all-around daypacks out there, the CamelBak Sequoia 22 is it. While it was the most expensive pack in our test group, it was also one of the most comfortable, and it comes with a 3L hydration reservoir. The reservoir sits in its own insulated pocket, and there is still plenty of room in the rest of the bag for everything you'd need on a day hike, and then some. There's ample padding on the hip belt and lumbar area, and two foam/mesh panels that stick out from the back to offer support while maximizing airflow. It can withstand a beating, too, and the fit adjusts easily. It is on the heavier side and doesn't have a rain cover, but if you're looking for a comfortable bag for long days on the trail that performs the best across the board, get the Sequoia.

Read review: CamelBak Sequoia 22

Best Bang for the Buck


REI Co-op Trail 25 - Women's


REI Co-op Trail 25 Best Buy Award

$69.95
at REI
See It

Great value
Rain cover
Low weight
Webbing hipbelt
Not well-ventilated in the back
Excessive hanging straps
With all of the "fancy" new packs out there (that come with a fancy price tag), the REI Co-op Trail 25 was like a blast from the not too distant past. This bag has a simple design, with well-padded shoulder straps but only a 1-inch webbing hip belt. While other companies are investing in the latest and greatest technology in their packs — and charging you for it — REI is keeping it simple and very affordable at the same time. This pack retails for $70, which is half the price of some other bags out there! It has a ton of room (25L), though without a load-bearing hip belt you probably don't want to fill it up too much. (Editor's Note — a webbing hip belt like this one will prevent the pack from shifting around on you but won't transfer much of the weight onto your hips.) It does also have some great features for the price point, including a stowable rain cover, trekking pole attachments, and several options for attaching extra gear and using it overnight. If hip belts aren't your thing, or you just can't see yourself spending a ton of money on a daypack when you'd rather spend it getting to your next adventure, the REI Co-op Trail 25 is a solid bet.

Read review: REI Co-op Trail 25 - Women's

Top Pick for Fast and Light


Mammut Lithia Speed 20


Mammut Lithia Speed 20 Top Pick Award

$99.95
at Amazon
See It

Lightest pack in our review!
Modest price
Compression straps and ice axe holder
Lacks padding for comfort
Sized small and not adjustable
There are times when you want lots of padding and a comfortable ride, and others when you need something small for a fast mission into the mountains. If you're looking for a pack for the latter, the Mammut Lithia Speed 20 is the bag for you. It weighs a paltry 19 ounces, making it 1.5 pounds lighter than our Editors' Choice winner. While that alone doesn't seem like much, when you start shaving the pounds and ounces off of your gear, the differences add up. Mammut put this pack on a diet by skimping on the padding and using only 70D material; survive a tumble through some desert scrub oak it might not. It's also on the small side — it didn't really fit our main tester, and we had to pass it on to a shorter friend for testing. But, it still packs some useful features into its small and light package, including double compression straps for locking down your load when you're flying down the trail.

Read review: Mammut Lithia Speed 20

Top Pick for Around Town


Osprey Tempest 20


Osprey Tempest 20 Top Pick Award

$106.70
at Amazon
See It

Lightweight and comfortable
Feature-laden
"Lidlock" attachment for bike helmets
Sizing runs small
Small internal capacity
Less adjustable than others
For those who like to use a daypack for commuting around town or general daily use, check out the Osprey Tempest 20. This lightweight bag is big enough to fit a standard laptop and some books or binders, without being too bulky or heavy. It has good padding on the hip belt and shoulder straps, and the mesh back helps with airflow and circulation. Best of all, it has a bike helmet attachment which actually works! The "Lidlock" tab and bungee cord help keep your helmet securely against the bag, with no flopping around. If you're commuting on a bike and want an easy way to carry your helmet once you lock it up, this is the bag for you. Oh, and it'll work pretty well on the trails too!

Read review: Osprey Tempest 20

select up to 5 products
Score Product Price Our Take
80
$145
Editors' Choice Award
An excellent pack for extended day hikes and all sorts of activities. Hydration bladder included!
79
$130
A great pack for those who hike in wet climates and who are on the smaller side.
74
$110
Top Pick Award
A good choice for commuters and smaller women .
74
$100
A great option for those who can't get a good fit in most other women's versions.
73
$70
Best Buy Award
A lightweight and inexpensive pack for light day hikes.
72
$116
A roomy, lightweight daypack without a lot of padding.
72
$129
A basic daypack with a big price tag.
70
$100
Top Pick Award
Great for fast hiking and/or alpine climbing adventures.
68
$119
A smaller pack with a minimal hipbelt.

Analysis and Test Results


We tested the daypacks on day hikes, sightseeing trails, while paddle boarding, commuting, and many other activities to find the best ones out there for a variety of uses. From the Tetons to the Adirondacks, we put these packs to the test using our side-by-side comparison process. Below we'll break down how we rated each model, and why these different categories are important to consider in the first place. We'll let you know which models stood out, and if they didn't, what it was that caused them to receive a bad score. We also have a comprehensive Buying Advice Guide where we break down some of the main factors to consider when selecting your next daypack.

This view does not suck ... testing out packs on Jackson Lake. We hiked  biked  paddled (but thankfully didn't swim!) in these bags to help you find the best one for your next mountain adventure.
This view does not suck ... testing out packs on Jackson Lake. We hiked, biked, paddled (but thankfully didn't swim!) in these bags to help you find the best one for your next mountain adventure.

Comfort


When it comes to hiking, comfort is a key consideration for all of the gear that you wear from your head to your toes, and your daypack is one of the most important pieces. An ill-fitting or minimally padded pack will make your outing less enjoyable, and we don't think hiking should be about suffering (unless you want it to be!). As such, the comfort rating accounted for 30% of each pack's overall score. Here's how we rated the different models for comfort:


We evaluated this category based on several things: how well the padding actually "padded" our hips and shoulders, how well the hipbelts helped carry the weight, how well the design helped keep us cool while hiking, or if we had a soaking wet shirt after a couple of miles on the trail, and if there were any annoying design features that impacted our comfort level. The standouts in this category were our Editors' Choice winner, the CamelBak Sequoia 22, and the Osprey Sirrus 24. These two packs had a lot in common, including well-padded hipbelts and shoulder straps, open mesh backs to aid in ventilation, and some internal framing to help keep the contents of the pack off of our backs.

The CamelBak Sequoia was one of the most comfortable bags that we tested. Even when loaded up with 3L of water  extra layers  a rain jacket  and food for the day  we never felt uncomfortable  even after 3 miles of uphill hiking to see the "Rain Tree " a 3 000+ year old bristlecone pine.
The CamelBak Sequoia was one of the most comfortable bags that we tested. Even when loaded up with 3L of water, extra layers, a rain jacket, and food for the day, we never felt uncomfortable, even after 3 miles of uphill hiking to see the "Rain Tree," a 3,000+ year old bristlecone pine.

As you can see from the photo below, our high scorers for comfort are not your average pack from years past. These packs have a lot of design and technology put into them, and the results were great. The mesh on the Osprey Sirrus 24 never rubbed against us in an uncomfortable way (we did have a shirt on at all times), and it was really impressive how much cooler our backs stayed (and we hiked in this packs in the desert southwest in summer!). The raised pads on the CamelBak Sequoia 22 also achieved the same result while still offering some padding in key places. Some packs, like the Gregory Maya 22, came close to this design, with mesh covering the padding, but the bulk of the pack still rested against our backs. This was not nearly as comfortable because it reduced airflow, and we could also feel the contents of the pack pushing into our backs.

Some of the innovative back designs in our test group (left to right): CamelBak Sequoia 22  Lowe Alpine Airzone Trail ND 24  Osprey Sirrus 24.
Some of the innovative back designs in our test group (left to right): CamelBak Sequoia 22, Lowe Alpine Airzone Trail ND 24, Osprey Sirrus 24.

Another design feature that affected our comfort on the trail was the hip belt. All of the packs in this review, except for the REI Co-op Trail 25, had a load-bearing hip belt, but we still found a varying degree of comfort between some of them. The CamelBak Sequoia and Montane Habu 22's hip belts covered our hip bones completely with a good amount of padding. The Deuter ACT Trail 22 uses a wide swath of unpadded mesh as its hip belt, which didn't feel very comfortable after a long day on the trail, and the Mammut Lithia Speed's hip belt had buckles that sat directly over the front of our hip bones, which was not comfortable either. As for the webbing hip belt on the REI Co-op Trail 25, it'll help to keep the bag from shifting around on your back, but it won't transfer any of the load off of your shoulders, and it negatively impacted the comfort level of that bag.

The difference between a load-bearing hipbelt (left) and a webbing one (right) is noticeable the more weight you carry. A load-bearing hipbelt can carry an estimated 80% of the load  saving your shoulders (and your sanity!) on the trail.
The difference between a load-bearing hipbelt (left) and a webbing one (right) is noticeable the more weight you carry. A load-bearing hipbelt can carry an estimated 80% of the load, saving your shoulders (and your sanity!) on the trail.

A proper hip belt should transfer the majority of the weight of your pack off of your shoulders and onto your hips. This makes a big difference even with a 10-15 pound load, particularly if you're covering long distances. While there are many daypacks out there without a load-bearing hipbelt, we'd highly recommend purchasing one with. You can always clip it behind the pack if you don't want to use it; it won't add that much to the overall weight of the bag, and you'll be happy to have it in many situations.

Features


We consider the features that a pack has another key purchase consideration because no matter how comfortable a pack is, if it can't do the things you need it to on the trail, it's not going to serve you very well. While some manufacturers seem to be throwing every possible feature they conceive of on a pack, we also evaluated how necessary or well-thought-out each feature was. For example, the REI Co-op Trail 25 has a daisy chain that runs down either side of the back, but how useful is that really? If you use that webbing to attach a bunch of gear, you'll be a walking Christmas tree, which is neither sleek nor efficient. Here's how we scored the different models for their features.


As you can see, we liked the features of our Editors' Choice winner CamelBak Sequoia 22, both Osprey models, and yes, even the REI Co-op Trail 25 (minus those daisy chains, of course). There were many reasons why we rated these packs so high, and we'll begin with the hip belt pocket. This handy feature has only been available on packs in the last few years, and we want to hug whoever first thought of the idea, particularly in the age of the smartphone. There's nothing more annoying than getting repeated texts or phone calls on the trail and having to take your pack off and dig through it each time. Sure, you could ignore them, and in many places, you won't even have cell service, but let's be real — if our phone dings, most of us are going to check it. We loved this feature for other knick knacks too, like lip balm or a set of keys, but it's mainly for our smartphone (which is also our camera), and if a hipbelt pocket is too small to fit your phone it's a big miss. We could squeeze our phone into all of the hipbelt pockets in this review except the Mammut Lithia Speed's. Also, note that the Deuter and REI models did not have this feature.

A hipbelt pocket is great for holding a phone or other quick access items.
A hipbelt pocket is great for holding a phone or other quick access items.

Another feature we appreciated was a rain cover that stashed in a pocket in the bottom of the pack. Three packs in this review had one included: the Osprey Sirrus, REI Co-op and Deuter. Do you need this feature? That depends on where you live and where you like to hike. Rainstorms can happen even in the desert, and a rain cover will keep your extra layers, snacks, or big DSLR camera drier than a pack without one. They do add a few ounces to the overall weight of the pack, and while you might be tempted to take it out on clear days with no chance of rain, just remember to put it back in 12-year-old.

We appreciated this rain cover while hiking around on a wet day in Yellowstone National Park. Our extra layers and snacks stayed dry  and the rain cover easily stashed back away once the skies cleared.
We appreciated this rain cover while hiking around on a wet day in Yellowstone National Park. Our extra layers and snacks stayed dry, and the rain cover easily stashed back away once the skies cleared.

Some packs also had specific holders for your trekking poles. Whether or not you like to hike with them is up to you, but if you do, having a way to stash them securely when you don't need them is a nice feature. The Osprey models have a "Stow-on-the-Go" attachment system that works well for times when you want to put the poles away quickly for a short period, say to scramble up a rock. You thread your poles up through the loop on the bottom of the pack and then under the loop on the shoulder strap. No taking off your pack required. However, your poles are now under your armpit and banging around your shoulder. This is tolerable for five minutes tops.

Some of the different methods of stowing your trekking poles. The Lowe Alpine (left) and REI Co-op Trail (center) have tabs for holding the bottom of the poles and straps to secure the top. The Osprey Sirrus (right) secures them to the side and shoulder strap.
Some of the different methods of stowing your trekking poles. The Lowe Alpine (left) and REI Co-op Trail (center) have tabs for holding the bottom of the poles and straps to secure the top. The Osprey Sirrus (right) secures them to the side and shoulder strap.

The REI Co-op Trail 25 has tabs for securing the bottom of the poles and straps for the tops. Other packs, like the Mammut Lithia Speed, didn't have specific holders but did have two compression straps on either side, which works equally well. A single set of straps is usually not sufficient. All of the packs we tested also had one ice axe holder, which seems like a standard addition to a daypack even though only a fraction of hikers even use one. If you need to hold two ice axes though, the Montane Habu 22 has two holders with reinforced plastic loops.

If you plan on actually using the ice axe loops  look for ones like the Montane Habu's  which are reinforced with plastic and can accommodate two axes.
If you plan on actually using the ice axe loops, look for ones like the Montane Habu's, which are reinforced with plastic and can accommodate two axes.

All of the models that we tested were hydration bladder compatible in various ways, but only one, the CamelBak Sequoia 22, actually came with a reservoir. Whether you prefer to drink from a bottle or a hose is another question of personal preference, though hydration aficionados avow that you'll stay better hydrated if you can take small sips of water more frequently from a hose without having to stop and drink from a bottle. It is handy for sports that require the use of your hands, like paddle boarding, biking, and even hiking with trekking poles. If you plan on using a bladder, check out the framing (or lack of) in the pack and where the bladder sits. For example, on the Gregory Maya 22 the reservoir fits into a slot right next to your back, but there is no framing there, and as a result, a full 2 or 3L bladder will push into your back until you drink all of it.

Making use of the included hydration reservoir on the CamelBak Sequoia. It was easy to pop the nozzle in our mouth between strokes and then drink while still paddling.
Making use of the included hydration reservoir on the CamelBak Sequoia. It was easy to pop the nozzle in our mouth between strokes and then drink while still paddling.

Finally, some models had great features specific to one application. Our Top Pick for Around Town, the Osprey Tempest 20, has a great way of securing a bike helmet. You might not need that on a day hike, but if you need a pack for commuting to school or work, the "Lidlock" attachment is a great feature to look for. You simply thread the plastic holder through your helmet, rotate it to lay flat on top, and the bungee holds it in place with no flopping around. The outside pocket on the Gregory Maya 22 could also fit a bike helmet.

Hopping on a bike share rental to tour around a big city. The "LidLock" attachment for our helmet kept it secure while not riding.
Hopping on a bike share rental to tour around a big city. The "LidLock" attachment for our helmet kept it secure while not riding.

Weight


We like to consider the weight of all of our outdoor gear purchases. Whether it's our shoes, trekking poles, or packs, shaving ounces off our clothing and gear can quickly add up to large weight savings, which makes each mile that much easier to cover. Below you'll see the actual weight of each pack that we tested, with about a 1.5-pound difference between the heaviest and lightest daypacks in our review.


If there's one thing that we learned in this review, it's that it's hard to have it all in a daypack. Want a lot of padding with a frame that supports the weight you're carrying? Then you're going to end up with a heavier bag. Want something lightweight that won't weigh you down? Then you might have to sacrifice on durability a little, as paper-thin nylon is not as durable in the long-term compared to a thicker (and therefore heavier) material. The lightest pack in our review, the Mammut Lithia Speed 20, weighs only 19 ounces and is a great choice for minimalist hikers who like to move fast. But it was also one of the least comfortable packs that we tested, and the 70D nylon is on the thin side and might not withstand heavy use over time.

Moving fast in the wilderness in the Mammut Lithia Speed. We barely felt this lightweight pack on our backs  and it was a great choice for fast trail hikes/runs.
Moving fast in the wilderness in the Mammut Lithia Speed. We barely felt this lightweight pack on our backs, and it was a great choice for fast trail hikes/runs.

The North Face Aleia 22 weighs only six ounces more than the Mammut, but thanks to more padding in the back and more coverage in the hip belt, it had a higher score for comfort. We did have durability concerns about this pack too though, as the main material is also thin. On the other end of the spectrum was the Osprey Sirrus. This pack weighs 41 ounces, or almost 1.5 pounds more than the Mammut. They're heavier because of the framing for the back, extra padding, and thicker material, which is less likely to wear through. If the heavier packs were even heavier we might have a hard time still recommending them, but when combining all the factors we assessed these packs by, the better comfort and durability "outweighed" the weight consideration in the end.

The North Face Aleia 22 was one of the other lightweight bags in this review  but we did have some durability concerns with the thin material used to achieve the lighter weight.
The North Face Aleia 22 was one of the other lightweight bags in this review, but we did have some durability concerns with the thin material used to achieve the lighter weight.

Adjustability


Daypacks are notorious for not having as much adjustability as a full 60L backpacking pack. Many manufacturers only offer them in one size, and there's often limited options for further adjustment, like load-lifting straps on the shoulders or hip belt tensioners. We took into consideration whether the different models had any of the above, how many sizes they came in (and what the actual range of those sizes are), and if they had any further adjustability. As you can see from the scores below, none of the packs impressed us enough to receive a 10/10 in this category.


We were most impressed with the size range available in The North Face Aleia 22, and it received the highest rating in this category. We tested it in the M/L size (our main tester's torso length is 19 in, she's 5'6" and weighs 125 pounds), and this was the only pack whose hip belt not only gave us enough coverage but also had room to spare, which was really surprising to us, all things considered, because we are doing a women's daypack review and not a girl's. In fact, the Osprey Tempest 20, which comes at its largest in a size S/M, seemed more sized for a petite 12-year-old than a grown woman. The hip belt barely came up to our hip bones, and we wear a size 2 pant! What's a size 8 or 10 lady supposed to do? Osprey wasn't the only offender either: Deuter, Gregory, and Mammut all seem to size their packs for tiny ladies. That's not inherently bad — smaller people need well-fitting packs too after all, but if you're only producing one size and that size is minuscule, it leaves a lot of ladies out of the loop.

The difference between the coverage offered by the Osprey Tempest 20 (left) and The North Face Aleia 22 (right). The Tempest's hipbelt barely reached around far enough to cover our hipbones  and this model is smaller than the average woman.
The difference between the coverage offered by the Osprey Tempest 20 (left) and The North Face Aleia 22 (right). The Tempest's hipbelt barely reached around far enough to cover our hipbones, and this model is smaller than the average woman.


The other thing to consider as far as adjustability goes is the torso length of the bag. We discuss how to properly size a pack in our Buying Advice Guide, and you should try to get a good fit in that area as well. If a bag is too short or too long for you, the hip belt won't work well, and you'll be carrying more of the load on your shoulders. Most of the packs in this review came in one size only, and the length of the torso ranged from 16-18 inches, so if you fall out of that range you could be out of luck. The Osprey Sirrus 24 was the only daypack in our test group that had an adjustable back, giving a range between 15 and 19 inches.

The adjustable back on the Osprey Sirrus lets you dial in the fit better for your torso length. Unfortunately though  this bag still had a very short hipbelt.
The adjustable back on the Osprey Sirrus lets you dial in the fit better for your torso length. Unfortunately though, this bag still had a very short hipbelt.

We did appreciate that some packs had load-lifting straps on the shoulders, but they were often ineffective. Once you've adjusted your hip belt and shoulder straps, the load-lifters are supposed to help lift the weight off your lower back and distribute it evenly across your back. For these straps to really work though, the body of the pack has to extend above the shoulder straps, which wasn't usually the case with these daypacks, since the body of the pack is so small.

There's almost no point in adding a load-lifter on a small bag  as they can't effectively lift the weight up your back.
There's almost no point in adding a load-lifter on a small bag, as they can't effectively lift the weight up your back.

Durability


Here's a personal durability story from our head tester.
"I bought a Dana Designs pack in 2004 for day hiking and rock climbing approaches. It must have been made with at least a 300-400D material with an even thicker doubled bottom. That pack lasted for 10 years! I used it in Yosemite, with its rough granite, and Red Rocks, with its sandpaper rock and spiky plants. When I retired it I bought a highly rated pack from one of the manufacturers in this review. Nine months later it had more holes in it than my old Dana. It was lighter than the Dana, but I'll take a few extra ounces if it means I don't have to buy a new pack every year."

Here's how we rated the different models in this review for durability. Note that we couldn't get a year's worth of use on each test pack to assess their durability. Instead, we looked for signs of wear after the three months of use that they did get, combed through online user reviews to look for durability concerns or patterns, and evaluated them based on our extensive experience with outdoor gear.


We were most impressed with the durability of the Osprey Sirrus 24. The body of the bag is made with a 210D nylon, while the bottom is an even thicker 420D pack cloth. Bottoms are a high-wear spot, and having an extra-thick material there, like the Sequoia 22, or a double layer of material is a nice feature. We worried about the long-term durability of the 70D Mammut Lithia Speed, and also the 100D The North Face Aleia 22. The Aleia showed the most wear on the bottom after similar use, and we also almost lost the ice axe holder loop as it's only a thin bungee cord that's secured with a knot.

After three months the pack cloth on the bottom of the Osprey Sirrus (top) has only one small scuff  while the bottom of The North Face Aleia (bottom) is already showing significant scuffs and wear.
After three months the pack cloth on the bottom of the Osprey Sirrus (top) has only one small scuff, while the bottom of The North Face Aleia (bottom) is already showing significant scuffs and wear.

No pack will last forever, and some terrains are less forgiving than others. If you're hiking on well-maintained trails in "gentle" forest ecosystems, this might be less of a concern for you. If you're scrambling up craggy peaks or squeezing through sandy slot canyons, a thicker material will offer more abrasion resistance and you should consider this when making a purchase decision.

Hiking in a "gentle" forest on well-maintained trails? You might not have to worry much about durability. Always consider the terrain that you'll be using your gear in when deciding what purchase criteria are most important to you.
Hiking in a "gentle" forest on well-maintained trails? You might not have to worry much about durability. Always consider the terrain that you'll be using your gear in when deciding what purchase criteria are most important to you.

Conclusion


Taking a well-deserved break by Owen Pond  New York. We hiked a lot this summer! It's a tough job  but we're happy to do it... and hopefully it helped you find the best daypack for your adventuring needs.
Taking a well-deserved break by Owen Pond, New York. We hiked a lot this summer! It's a tough job, but we're happy to do it... and hopefully it helped you find the best daypack for your adventuring needs.

Finding the perfect daypack can feel like an overwhelming challenge. With so many models, even from the same manufacturer (Osprey alone makes eight different daypacks in multiple volume choices), it can be difficult to find the perfect one for you. We hope our extensive testing and ratings helped you in that quest.
Cam McKenzie Ring

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