Best Trail Running Shoes for Women of 2018

Heather enjoys the HOKA ONE ONE Challenger ATR 3 in the desert.
Ready to hit the trails? We searched for the best women's trail running shoe by evaluating over 110 of the best contenders out there! After careful selection, we chose 14 of the best trail running shoes to compare side by side. Our crushing female testing team tackled hundreds of miles — running up and down some of the most difficult trails in the world! From the high Andes to the high deserts of the Colorado Plateau, to the flats of the coastal Great Lakes. We've tested distances everywhere from one to fifty miles in a single push. In these tests, we compared foot protection, traction, stability, weight, comfort, fit, and sensitivity. After experiences of mixed elation and exhaustion, post-gel consumption, and sore muscles, we've provided you with some seriously in-depth feedback on the best trail running shoes out there.

Read the full review below >

Test Results and Ratings

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Analysis and Award Winners


Review by:
Amber King
Senior Review Editor
OutdoorGearLab

Last Updated:
Sunday
May 6, 2018

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Updated May 2018
As the seasons cycle, so do new and updated versions of your favorite trail running shoes! We are continuously updating our selection, providing you with the best updates that we can find on the market. This updated review introduces an exciting new lightweight award winner, fresh from the HOKA ONE ONE fleet. Stay tuned for a full update on all trail running shoes in the next two months!

Best Overall Women's Trail Runner


inov-8 Roclite 305 GTX


Editors' Choice Award

$103.99
at MooseJaw
See It

Type of shoe: Traditional | Heel-to-toe drop: 8 mm
Waterproof and upper dries quickly
Overall traction
Low weight
Excellent cushioning and energy return
Rigid with a narrow toe box
Needs to be broken in
Lacks robust stability
Crushing trail miles in the inov-8 Roclite 305 GTX is a real treat. It didn't take long to realize this shoe is a unique one. Equipped with a waterproof overlay and numerous protective features, it handles everything from inclement weather to bluebird days equally well. The water-resistant overlays make it a perfect compadre for stream crossings and wet days.

The well-spaced Tri-C sticky lugs utilize three different kinds of rubber to ensure traction on everything from muddy trails to deep sand. Our biggest caveat was its stiff upper and status quo stability. This shoe also provides tremendous traction and protection. Ladies - take a gander at this year's Editors' Choice award winner!

Read review: inov-8 Roclite 305 GTX- Women's

Best Bang for Your Buck


Saucony Peregrine 7 - Women's


http://www.saucony.com/
Best Buy Award

$65.97
at Backcountry
See It

Type of shoe: Low profile | Heel-to-toe drop: 4 mm
Super comfy midsole
Durable and aggressive outsole
Great for wide to narrow feet
Fantastic stability and sensitivity
Runs small
Doesn't shed mud easily
The Saucony Peregrine 7 - Women's is the perfect pick for those looking for a great deal and a fantastic shoe. As our Editors' Choice for a few years in a row, this low profile option sports exemplary versatility for a decent price of just $120. Its design balances great foot protection and sensitivity that can easily cross over from roads to trails. The outsole is incredibly bitey - providing high performance on both technical terrain and dirt roads.

As one of the most breathable shoes tested, it's suited for hot days and super comfortable! The superior foot protection comes in the form of a rock plate and extra cushion in the midsole that protects from extended impacts on the trails. The Saucony Peregrine 7's logo "Run Anywhere" is faithful to the shoe…you can truly go anywhere and expect exceptional performance. Since this shoe sports such great versatility for a decent price of $120, this is our Best Buy Award winner.

Read review: Saucony Peregrine 7 - Women's

Top Pick for Lightweight Performance


HOKA ONE ONE Evo Jawz - Women's


HOKA ONE ONE Evo Jawz - Womens
Top Pick Award

$129.95
at MooseJaw
See It

Type of Shoe: Low Profile, minimalist | Heel-to-toe drop: 3 mm
Super Lightweight
Aggressive and sticky tread
Continuous and breathable upper
Great for soft or technical trails
Potential durability issues
Lacks protective features
Enjoy the trail biting power of the new HOKA ONE ONE Evo Jawz! This new lightweight shoe manufactured by HOKA ONE ONE will have you flying up and down the steepest switchbacks. The grippy and aggressive Vibram sole inspires confidence on technical, loose trails while the lightweight breathable upper is perfect for warm days in the summer.

The minimalist construct with little cushioning in the midsole provides little protection but boasts fantastic sensitivity and stability. Enjoy it for your next race or jaunt around town. Just be weary of the durability issues that we've observed in our testing period.

Read review: HOKA ONE ONE Evo Jawz - Women's

Top Pick Award for Sloppy Surfaces


Salomon Speedcross 4 - Women's


Type of shoe: Traditional | Heel-to-toe drop: 10 mm
Excellent traction on soft surfaces
Stability
One pull lacing system
Precise fit
Best only for narrow feet
Lugs wear down on hard surfaces
Not ideal for cross-over terrain
Slow to dry
If you're looking the best in traction out there, the Salomon Speedcross 4 - Women's is the best option! We slogged this shoe through all the nastiest stuff we could think of; snow, slush, rocks, kitty litter, mud, and sand.

The deep 5mm multi-directional chevron lugs are composed of a sticky rubber that grips almost anything (except super slippery surfaces), giving any runner the confidence to charge up and down switchbacks. Not only that, the construction is durable and seamless, protecting from stubs and trail debris. Because of its extraordinary performance in the 'nasty', we have given it our Top Pick for Sloppy Surfaces.

Read review: Salomon Speedcross 4 - Women's

Top Pick for Comfort


HOKA ONE ONE Challenger ATR 4 - Women's


Top Pick Award

$129.95
at Backcountry
See It

Type of shoe: Maximalist - low profile | Heel-to-toe drop: 5 mm
Super plush and cushioned
Great traction on dry or flat surfaces
Lightweight and breathable
Wider forefoot in the new model
Dries quickly
Less stable than other shoes tested
Less sensitive
In search of comfort? The new HOKA ONE ONE ATR Challenger 4 features auber plush midsole that will have you hitting the trails for hours on end. This maximalist trail runner has a bomber outsole that grabs and suctions to the trail. Best for dry or flat surfaces, it does great in all sorts of climates. The thin, streamlined outsole is super breathable and quick to dry making it a perfect option for river crossings or wet weather. That said, it's not a warm shoe, so make sure to wear warm socks in the winter.

Aside from that, we are happy with this shoe on most trails. Just leave it at home for the sloppiest surfaces. If comfort is your priority, make sure to check out the HOKA ONE ONE ATR Challenger 4. This model has been updated with more arch support and a wider forefoot that better accommodates foot splay. That said, some lovers of the Challenger 3 aren't super stoked about the wider and less precise fit, while other users have proved to be converted. If you are a sucker for comfort, this Top Pick for Comfort may be the one.

Read review: HOKA ONE ONE ATR 4 - Women's

Top Pick Award for Wide Feet


Altra Lone Peak 3.5 - Women's


Type of shoe: Low profile - zero drop | Heel-to-toe drop: 0 mm
Wide, foot-shaped toe box forefoot to accommodate toe splay and foot swelling
Super comfy and responsive midsole
Durable Upper
Trail claw stone guard enhances sensitive without losing protection
New upper is stretchier providing better comfort and breathability
Sloppier, less precise fit
Slippery on wet rocks
Short laces
Wide feet? If yes, take a long look at the Altra Lone Peak 3.5. As a personal favorite of the lead editor, this foot-shaped trail shoe features aextra large toe box. It provides ample wiggle room for your toes while protecting them along rough trails and terrain. And they're comfy, too. Its fit is true to size with a new stretchy and breathable upper.

The trail claw stone guard and moderate cushioning underfoot protect feet from rocky trails and painful surfaces. The Lone Peak 3.5 is suited for all lengths of runs, with the Ultra distances in mind. Also, it moves well over all terrain, integrating 'zero-drop' technology that is best for midfoot to forefoot strikers. If you're looking for a shoe designed to let your toes splay out while on the run (or if you have really wide feet) then this Top Pick for Wide Feet is our top recommendation.

Read review: Altra Lone Peak 3.5 - Women's

select up to 5 products
Score Product Price Our Take
707
$140
Editors' Choice Award
No matter the kind of terrain you'll encounter, the Editors' Choice winner can handle it.
702
$120
Best Buy Award
This model crosses over well from road to trail while also providing good value for a low-profile shoe.
684
$130
Top Pick Award
This model is built with mountain running in mind and has features intended for technical terrain.
671
$120
Top Pick Award
A superb choice for wider feet and toe-spreaders, with comfort from the foothills to mountaintops.
662
$125
A light model, these shoes make you feel fast.
657
$130
Top Pick Award
Tear up the trail with this Top Pick for comfort, boasting ample cushioning.
653
$130
Low profile and burly at the same time, this shoe is stable with high traction without sacrificing sensitivity.
630
$130
A superior fit and arch support allow you fly along technical terrain.
621
$135
Light and sensitive, this model makes a trail run an intimate experience, in a good way.
617
$130
Delivering a comfortable ride for long days on the trail, this model is a classic choice.
612
$130
Performing in all weather, this low-profile model does well on moderate terrain.
544
$125
A traditionally built model, this shoe is suited for groomed surfaces and easy trails.
464
$85
If you're a sometimes-runner looking for a cheaper option that works on trail, try this model.
77
$130
Top Pick Award
Be quick and light in our Top Pick for Lightweight Performance.

Analysis and Test Results


Over the last few years, we've run our legs off to determine which is the best trail running shoe out there. While the best shoe for you is dependent on its fit for your foot, we performed a series of performance tests to evaluate other features of the shoe objectively. As a result, we have generated a variety of recommendations based on what any runner may be looking for in a trail running shoe. We have vigorously tested each women's trail running shoe with objective tests to determine which did the best over six different testing metrics. With these trials, we were able to identify each shoe's strengths - and its pitfalls.

Traveling from Canada to the USA to Peru, we were able to test each shoe in a variety of environmental conditions. This includes high alpine summits to sandy deserts. We topped out at 16,800 feet on high, technical passes in the Peruvian Andes and slogged through deep sand. We tackled rocked out and rooted forest trails and made it down the pavement river walk at least three times a week. We ran each shoe in both summer and winter in varying distances from one to 50 miles in one stint. In addition to our objective in-lab tests and with 100s of miles in the field, we were able to determine how each shoe scored comparatively in each metric. With these scores, we determined which trail running shoe deserved awards and shout-outs.

The San Juans proved to be a great testing ground for trail running shoes. In this photo  we run above tree line to tag three 12 000 ft mountain peak summits in a day. The Altra Lone Peak 3.5 proved to be a great compahgre on this mission in the Red Mountains.
The San Juans proved to be a great testing ground for trail running shoes. In this photo, we run above tree line to tag three 12,000 ft mountain peak summits in a day. The Altra Lone Peak 3.5 proved to be a great compahgre on this mission in the Red Mountains.

To choose our metrics, we not only racked our brains to determine which parameters were the most important, but we also polled numerous trail runners on popular Facebook pages, talked to professionals and local athletes. In these conversations, we learned (and agreed) that foot protection (25%), traction (25%), stability (15%), comfort & fit (15%), weight (10%), and sensitivity (10%) are the most important factors to consider. In the end, we gave each trail running shoe a score out of ten in each category for a total out of 100 points.

We used the following scoring rubric for each metric:
  • 0 - 1: Failure in performance
  • 2 - 4: Poor performance
  • 5 - 7: Average performance
  • 8 - 9: Amazing performance
  • 10: The BEST!

Very few shoes scored a ten in any one metric, and no shoe in this review earned a "failure in performance" in any of these categories. Also, when looking at these scores, determine which metrics are most important for you to find your favorite trail runner.

Foot Protection


Foot protection is imperative when exposing feet to rough trail surfaces. Ruts, rocks, mud, snow, dust, and sand can cause discomfort if your feet aren't properly protected. For this metric, we looked specifically at the shoe's ability to protect the underside of the foot. Through our testing, we learned that thicker cushioning with an integrated rock plate did better than those without. Hard toe caps that completely covered the toes helped to prevent stubs and promote all day protection.

Water-resistant uppers provide better protection while crossing rivers and streams or facing adverse weather. Breathable uppers that dried quickly also provided better protection with water. Finally, we looked at the porosity of the upper mesh, that keeps out fine particulates. Shoes with a tightly knit mesh did better than shoes with a more porous design. Taking each of these micro-metrics into consideration, we were able to decipher which shoes had the best foot protection.


Best All-Around Protection
The inov-8 Roclite provides the best protection of all the contenders, making it our Editors' Choice. The Salomon Speedcross 4 scores high marks for its seamless mesh that doesn't allow any pesky trail debris to penetrate. Also, we loved its wonderfully responsive cushion underfoot that didn't only protect feet on the trail but kept it comfortable during long days. We only wished that it had a rock plate for platinum protection. The HOKA ONE ONE Evo Jawz also features a continuous upper that is a little thinner and more breathable than the Salomon Speedcross 4.

The inov-8 Roclite 305 GTX does well for its unique water-resistant shell, making it the best option for stream and river crossings. The upper is seamless, not allowing even the finest particles to penetrate through, while the meta-shank rock plate and reinforced toe cap provide the ultimate in protection and stability on the trail. Both shoes are a great option if what you're looking for is the best in foot protection; however, the Roclite 305 is superior in the area of water resistance, whereas the Speedcross 4 provides a better debris-resistant mesh.

The water-resistant overlays of our New Editor's Choice winner of the inov-8 305 Roclite GTX makes it a perfect piece of equipment for early Spring running sessions.
The water-resistant overlays of our New Editor's Choice winner of the inov-8 305 Roclite GTX makes it a perfect piece of equipment for early Spring running sessions.

Of the traditional and maximalist shoes, the classic Brooks Cascadia 12 and HOKA ONE ONE model earned high points. The HOKA ONE ONE Challenger ATR 4 utilizes uber amounts of cushion that keeps feet protected from any and all trail hazards. This new model features an elongated toe cap for added protection. Its design also protects from debris like mud and gravel while providing solid breathability. The Brooks Cascadia 12 offers similar cushioning to the Trail N2, in addition to a forefoot rock plate.

The Salomon Speedcross's toe cap is hard and durable  preventing painful stubs on the trail.
The Salomon Speedcross's toe cap is hard and durable, preventing painful stubs on the trail.

Less Protective Options
If you're looking for a shoe that offers less in the way of protection, turn your attention to the ASICS GEL-Kahana 8, HOKA ONE ONE Evo Jawz and Salming Elements. None of these shoes features a rock plate or a particularly tough toe cap. That said, they all do a great job at keeping particulate matter out and have a place on less technical trails. The ASICS Gel Kahana 8 provides some foot protection in the way of gel pods underfoot, giving it a higher score. However, we found that it wasn't stable enough for technical terrain and it was quite sloppy overall. The Salmings scored the worst in this category overall because this shoe has little to no cushion and it lacks a rock plate. The HOKA ONE ONE Evo Jawz scored a little higher than the Salmon Elements because it features a touch more cushion. The trade-off for these protective elements is one heck of a sensitive and nimble shoe. So, if you're looking for a less protective shoe, take a look at these options.

Best for River Crossings
If you see a shoe that works for a water crossing, consider two options. First, is the water-resistant shoe, typically featuring a Gore-Tex insert. Second, consider a shoe that doesn't absorb water and dries quickly.

Of all the shoes tested, the inov-8 Roclite 305 GTX turned out to be the most water-resistant, featuring a Gore-tex insert that repelled water. Even when the shoe was almost fully immersed in a local stream, no water penetrated through the water-resistant layer. Every other shoe proved to absorb some water. We also noticed that even after thoroughly immersing the shoe (so water poured over from the top), the shoe itself dried within 15 minutes.

Alternatively, shoes like the HOKA ONE ONE Evo Jawz and the HOKA ONE ONE Challenger ATR 4 are not water resistant, but the upper materials do not hold water for long periods of time. For example, when crossing a river with the HOKA ONE ONE Evo Jawz, our feet became wet almost instantly. Fortunately, after five-ten minutes of running on a warm day, our feet dried out quickly due to the super breathable upper.

Looking to cross rivers? The New Balance Leadville v3 is another perfect option because it dries quickly and doesn't absorb much water.
Looking to cross rivers? The New Balance Leadville v3 is another perfect option because it dries quickly and doesn't absorb much water.

Traction


When treading over slippery and soft terrain, good traction inspires confidence and limits slips and falls. Based on where you run, your personal traction requirements may change. For example, if you find yourself in with lots of snow and rain, a shoe with longer lugs that can grip that slippery slope will be a much better option than a shoe with tiny lugs. But, if you run on groomed trails, a shoe with smaller lugs will provide better performance (and make you feel like you can go fast) as you can transition more quickly. If you like to cross over from groomed trails to the pavement, a shoe that has lugs large enough to grip the trail but not be a hindrance (or wear down) on the pavement is key. Typically these outsoles aren't as aggressive, and the lugs aren't as long.


When considering traction, we tested our contenders in all sorts of conditions. We ran over scree, mud, snow, slush, and pavement surfaces. We also tested each shoe during river crossings to see which were the least (and the most) slipperiest. We also measured the length, density, and shape of the lugs. Also, the type of rubber was evaluated. Sticky, more malleable rubbers typically grip and stick better than a harder rubber. In the end, we were able to determine which shoe had the best traction over a variety of surfaces and which were more specialized to either soft or hard trails.

None of the shoes performed perfectly in wet, rocky conditions. As we've continued to test shoes over the years, we still haven't found the perfect trail running shoe that can really, truly stick to super slimy surfaces.

Muddy trails might prove to be an issue for some contenders  but the Peregrine 7 held up!
Muddy trails might prove to be an issue for some contenders, but the Peregrine 7 held up!

Most Versatile
If you're in the market for a shoe that can successful relatively over most surfaces, ranging from mellow to technical, you should consider a shoe that is versatile. Not only are these trail runners great for running pretty much anywhere, but they can also double quite well as hikers. They typically have longs that aren't as long and don't wear down easily over time. Contenders like the Saucony Peregrine 7, inov-8 Roclite 305 GTX, and the Brooks Cascadia 12 are the most versatile shoes we tested because they did well over a slew of different types of terrain.

A look at the outsole that literally sticks to everything!
A look at the outsole that literally sticks to everything!

All have similar outsole features that include; 4 - 5 mm lugs, sticky rubber, and aggressively shaped lugs. All three have proven themselves over most surfaces, except for the super sloppy ones. The most significant differences are in the lug shape and design. For example, the inov-8 features widely spaced 'claw-like' lugs that are composed of three different densities of rubbers (to stick to a variety of surfaces). The Peregrine 7 features more lugs that are a little deeper and aggressive with an elongated multi-directional octagon shape that grips better to steeper surfaces. The Brooks have a plethora of shapes and sizes that grip the trail well, but it doesn't do so well on wet rocks. All tested well as hiking shoes, providing great underfoot support and protection.

Best for Soft Surfaces
If you're in the market for a shoe that will do well in mud or snow, consider an outsole that features widely spaced and long lugs. Three great options include the Salomon Speedcross 4, HOKA ONE ONE Evo Jawz, and the Salming Elements.

First, theSalomon Speedcross 4 is our Top Pick for sloppy surfaces because of its burly 5mm chevron-shaped lugs in addition to its protective construction. It sheds mud well and grapples with snow, mud, and sand well.

Similar to the Salomon Speedcross 4 (top)  the Elements (below) have widely spaced deep lugs for great traction on trail.
Similar to the Salomon Speedcross 4 (top), the Elements (below) have widely spaced deep lugs for great traction on trail.

The trail-biting HOKA ONE ONE Evo Jawz stands out for it's Vibram rubber and 6 mm lugs that prove to stick to some slippery rocks, and dig into the trail while hiking up high-angle slopes. That said, it is less beefy than the Speedcross 4 and doesn't have the same protective features.

The Salming Elements also scored high because of its unique square-shaped 8mm lugs. We found that even though the lugs were longer than the Speedcross 4, it didn't perform as well because of the density of lugs on the outsole. Mud stuck longer to this outsole and didn't shed as readily as both the HOKA ONE ONE Evo Jawz and the Speedcross 4.

The Salomon Speedcross 4 in action on soft to hard terrain in the San Juan mountains.
The Salomon Speedcross 4 in action on soft to hard terrain in the San Juan mountains.

Crossover Traction
If you're a roadrunner looking to get on the trails - or if you are a trail runner that loves the roads, deep lugs and super complex tread patterns aren't necessary. Instead, consider a crossover shoe that features shorter lugs that still provide a great bite trail. The best crossover road and trail specific runners that we tested include the Brooks Cascadia 12, ASICS GEL Kahana 8, and HOKA ONE ONE ATR Challenger 4.

Heather enjoys the cross-over capabilities of the Brooks Cascadia 12.
Heather enjoys the cross-over capabilities of the Brooks Cascadia 12.

Of all models tested, the HOKA ONE ONE Challenger ATR 4, Saucony Exodus ISO 2, and Brooks Cascadia 12 performed the best on and off the trail. All shoes feature a sticky outsole that does well on all trail terrain and works well for some sloppy surfaces. The Challenger ATR 4 features meta-rocker technology that propels you forward with every step. When getting off the trail, all perform well on both pavement and dirt roads. Shoes with longer lugs have a less comfortable ride on pavement, and the lugs wear down more easily. The ASICS GEL-Kahana 8 is the best on-road options for all trail shoes tested due to its less aggressive outsole. It performed best on stable, groomed surfaces with excellent performance on pavement and dirt roads.

The various traction patterns of the shoes tested in this review.
The various traction patterns of the shoes tested in this review.

Stability


While constantly encountering uneven surfaces and obstacles on the trail, stability in a shoe is of utmost importance. Good stability could mean the difference between running or limping out of the woods. In our testing, we determined that the most stable shoes have a lower stack height with a wider shoe platform and toe box. Some stable shoes have a rigid platform, while others have a flexible midsole that conforms to the contours of the trail. The most unstable shoes have a tall stack height with poor lateral and medial support. To test this metric, we simply ran technical trails with each shoe and observed how stable and confident we felt on the trail. We also looked at the stack height-width ratios to determine if our in-field observations were true to the metric data. In all cases - we found this indeed was the case.


The Best in Stability
This year the most stable shoe tested was the Salming Elements. The lack of cushion and rock plate makes it ultra sensitive with a very low stack height. Even though the forefoot is narrow, it still has the lowest ratio stack height: width ratio of all the shoes tested. We were able to feel every contour of the trail without turning an ankle, and this shoe features a flexible midsole that conforms to the trail. As a result, it earned a perfect ten in this metric - a hard score to achieve.

Even on unstable or rutted trails  the Salming Elements keep you nimble and quick!
Even on unstable or rutted trails, the Salming Elements keep you nimble and quick!

The shoes that earned a nine in this category include the La Sportiva Bushido, HOKA ONE ONE Evo Jawz, and Saucony Peregrine 7. All exhibited a similar level of stability that wasn't quite as stable as the Salming Elements. While the Evo Jawz comes close with its minimalist design, it has a little more cushioning in the midsole, making the shoe a little less flexible than the Salming Elements. The Bushidosuse a different approach for stability. Instead of a minimal design, it integrates TPU stability shanks into the midsole in addition to a low heel-to-toe drop that keeps you on the trail. Other products that performed well in this category included the ASICS Kahana 8, Brooks Cascadia 12 and the lightweight and stable Nike Terra Kiger 4.

More stable contenders feature a lower stack height and wider forefoot. Here we compare the stack height of our Top Pick for Comfort the HOKA Challenger ATR 3 (left) and our Best Buy winner the Saucony Peregrine 7. The Peregrine is more stable  but not nearly as cushioned.
More stable contenders feature a lower stack height and wider forefoot. Here we compare the stack height of our Top Pick for Comfort the HOKA Challenger ATR 3 (left) and our Best Buy winner the Saucony Peregrine 7. The Peregrine is more stable, but not nearly as cushioned.

The Least Stable
On the other side of the coin, it's not surprising that our maximalist contender from HOKA ONE ONE Challenger 4 didn't score high in this category because of it's relatively higher stack height. This new Challenger 4 now features a wider toe box (and thus a lower height to width ratio) that is more stable than then old Challenger 3. While many of our testers loved this new feature, some lovers of the Challenger 3 weren't too stoked about the wider and less precise fit. While stability is better in this model, this maximalist contender is still a little less stable than the rest, thus earning a lower score. While HOKA ONE ONE is getting better with stability, this seems to be an inherent trade-off in a maximalist shoe.

Comfort & Fit


Fit
Of all the metrics, the fit is probably the most important consideration for any runner. Even though we have delegated awards to shoes with great performance features - fit trumps all. If you get a trail running shoe that doesn't fit, it's going to be the worst shoe for you. That said, we have divided this section up so you can get a feel for which shoes are best for either narrow or wider feet. When testing, we gave each shoe to a variety of women with different foot shapes to determine how the fit is different. We also went online and read over one hundred reviews looking at the fit of the shoe, and whether it is true to fit or not.


In this section, we provide a short list of trail running shoe recommendations with a specific fit. We describe our top three picks for each category and list other options as well.

Wide Feet
Do you have wide feet? Check out our top trail running shoe recommendations.

Altra Lone Peak 3.5: Fitting a wide foot best, this shoe feels less snug than most other contenders. It does not feature additional arch support and is best for a forefoot or midfoot striker. It lacks much cushioning in the heel, and the zero drop technology needs to be broken into.

Saucony Peregrine 7: This low profile shoe features moderate cushioning in the heel with a very versatile fit. The toe box is wide while the feel fits snuggly. There is no additional arch support, but the ample cushioning throughout provides a comfortable ride on the trail.

The Altra Lone Peak 3.5 is a great option for runners looking for foot freedom! This shoe features an ultra-wide toe box that allows your toes to splay and separate during your trail run. We tested it in a plethora of terrain choices from the Rocky Mountains of Colorado to the Boreal forests of Ontario  Canada.
The Altra Lone Peak 3.5 is a great option for runners looking for foot freedom! This shoe features an ultra-wide toe box that allows your toes to splay and separate during your trail run. We tested it in a plethora of terrain choices from the Rocky Mountains of Colorado to the Boreal forests of Ontario, Canada.

Narrow Feet
Do you have narrow feet? Take a look at our top recommendations for you!

Salomon Speedcross 4 - Women's: This traditional trail runner offers plush cushioning throughout the midsole with a small amount of arch support. The shoe jives best with a narrow fit, fitting snuggly throughout the heel, arch, and toe box. The fit is true and works well for heel and midfoot strikers alike over short to long distances.

Merrell Agility Peak Flex: Many of our testers loved this low-profile shoe that offers ample responsive cushioning throughout the midsole. The lack of rock plate makes this shoe incredibly flexible, and it stands out for its excellent arch support that was the best of any model tested in this review. The fit is true that is best for shorter, daily runs.

La Sportiva Bushido: This low-profile shoe offers minimal cushioning throughout the midsole and provides more stability and sensitivity. The toe box fits a narrow foot best with a small amount of arch support. The heel cup is tight with a precise fit throughout the body of the shoe. The fit is about a half size smaller than most American shoe sizes, so make sure to order a half size up. Other options for narrow feet: inov-8 Roclite 305 GTX, Salming Elements.

If you're looking for a shoe that performs on the most technical terrain - this "Top Pick for Sloppy Surfaces" is your best bet!
If you're looking for a shoe that performs on the most technical terrain - this "Top Pick for Sloppy Surfaces" is your best bet!

Medium-Wide Feet
If you're just looking for a great shoe that fits a foot with a medium width, here are some options below.
Saucony Xodus ISO 2: This low profile shoe offers moderate cushioning and a responsive platform. The toe box is a bit narrow but not as narrow as the recommendations above. The shoe has a neutral fit with a smidgen of arch support. The fit is about a ½ size smaller than most shoes, so make sure you size up!

HOKA ONE ONE ATR 4: While the HOKA ONE ONE Challenger ATR 3 used to fit a narrow foot best, this new iteration now has a wider platform for better toe splay. The arch seems to be a little higher than the ATR 3, which some of our testers, while others did not. Either way, this shoe is now an excellent option for those with medium-wide feet.

Other options: ASICS GEL Kahana 8, Nike Terra Kiger 4, Brooks Cascadia 12, HOKA ONE ONE Evo Jawz

Heather enjoys the HOKA ONE ONE Challenger ATR 3 in the desert.
Heather enjoys the HOKA ONE ONE Challenger ATR 3 in the desert.

Comfort
While the fit is important for comfort, so are other features like a responsive, protective, and comfortable midsole especially if you plan on running long distances. Whether you're running an ultra-marathon or just getting out after work, comfort is key to ensure that you're not going to be hurting more than you need to the next day. To test comfort, we looked at the stack height and thickness of the midsole along with the quality of the foam used.

We also noted any weird areas of constriction or if blisters developed in any places. We also looked at the rigidity of the shoe and breathability. In the end, we learned that a thicker midsole stacked with plush, squishy, yet responsive foam is more comfortable than those without on the trail. We also learned that shoes that were less flexible and had more breathability typically scored lower than those with a bit of flex (but not too much) or a lack of breathability.

The Plushest
With ample cushioning throughout the midsole, it's not surprising that the HOKA ONE ONE Challenger ATR 4 is our Top Pick for Comfort. It stands out for its ample cushioning and numerous comfort features including a thin, breathable upper that is flexible and 28 mm of cushioning throughout the midsole. On the trail, our tester proclaimed this shoe to provide additional shock absorbance and thus less joint pain (if there was any in the first place) on the trail. That said, this experience varies person to person.

Amy enjoys miles of trail with her ultra-comfy HOKA maximalist shoes that fit narrow feet best.
Amy enjoys miles of trail with her ultra-comfy HOKA maximalist shoes that fit narrow feet best.

Aside from our perfect ten winners, the Altra Lone Peak 3.5 and Saucony Peregrine 7 scored the next highest in this category. The Altra Lone Peak features 25 mm of comfortable midsole material that is comfortable and protective. While the foam is protective and cushioned, we noticed that it broke down after roughly 150 miles. Some of our testers thought the uppers were a bit too thick and didn't offer the best in breathability. The Saucony Peregrine 7 on the other hand, features a more breathable upper, and 25mm of cushioning. We also noticed that the midsole did not break down as quickly. Other shoes that were pretty comfortable overall included the Brooks Cascadia 12 and Merrell Agility Peak Flex.

The Least Cushioned
While some runners love plush comfort, many prefer the intimate experience of the trail instead. If this is your priority, be sure to check out the Salming Elements. This trail running shoe offers little to no comfort in the form of the underfoot cushion, nor does it have a rock plate. It has 18mm of cushion in the heel with 14 mm in the forefoot. This shoe has a very narrow toe box with a reasonably precise fit throughout. This shoe is recommended for less technical and softer trails (concerning its level of comfort) because of its level of protection but has the capabilities to go anywhere (with some getting used to).

The La Sportiva is has the lowest stack height of all shoes tested with great protective features!
The La Sportiva is has the lowest stack height of all shoes tested with great protective features!

If you prefer a trail running shoe with a rock plate (and more protection) and little cushioning, be sure to check out the La Sportiva Bushido. It features less cushion than the Salming Elements with 14.5mm in the heel and 8.5 mm in the forefoot. This is a shoe better suited for longer distances and more technical trails due to its higher level of protection.

Weight


Having a lightweight shoe on the trail can make a world of difference if you're out for the day. If you're an ultra-runner, a couple of ounces may feel like ankle weights after 50 miles. If you're a recreational runner, a lighter construct may allow you to increase your turnover and have you feeling liberated on the trail. Also, it's important that when a shoe gets wet, it doesn't weigh you down.

When we evaluated weight, we performed three tests. First, we weighed each model while it was dry (dry weight = DW). Then we dunked each shoe in water for 30 seconds and squashed the shoe around to mimic movement while running through streams. Then we reweighed each model to determine how much water it held (wet weight = WW). Then we discovered the amount of water held (WH). We also tested to see which shoe dried the fastest, and which took the longest. The contenders that scored the highest in this category weighed the least when dry. They also held the least water when wet, and dried out the fastest. In general, all the shoes tested were lightweight and great for trail running. No shoe showed sub-optimal performance. However, some are better for going faster than others.


The Lightest Shoes
Winning our Top Pick for Lightweight performance is the HOKA ONE ONE Evo Jawz! Of all the shoes tested, it is the lightest (only 6.95 oz!) and holds the least amount of water in our water tests. This makes it an excellent option for a shorter race or speed workouts on the trail. Alternatively, if you prefer a shoe with a touch more cushioning underfoot (with a lightweight construct), we like the Nike Terra Kiger 4. Featuring a super lightweight and breathable construct, it weighs in only at 8.55 oz. After our dunk tests, it only held 3.9 oz (one of the most water resistant) and dried quickly. However, it's not as quick to dry as the Evo Jawz, nor is it as lightweight!

The Nike Terra Kiger 4 is the lightest shoe we tested in this review!
The Nike Terra Kiger 4 is the lightest shoe we tested in this review!

As a maximalist contender, we were surprised to note that the HOKA ONE ONE Challenger ATR 4 is the third lightest show in this review, holds the least amount of water when wet, and dries super fast. Weighing only 8.9 oz, the new breathable upper also proves to be quite water resistant, making it an excellent option for river crossings. When wet, it dries fast, allowing you to chug on for miles.

Other lightweight options: Salming Elements (8.65 oz)

Lightest when Wet
If you plan on crossing many streams or prefer a shoe that doesn't absorb a lot of water, the HOKA ONE ONE Evo Jawz and HOKA ONE ONE Challenger ATR 4 are great options. Both held little water during the dunk tests and dried out quickly after stream crossings.

The Heaviest
The heaviest shoes tested include the ASICS Kahana 7 (11.1 oz) and the Brooks Cascadia 12 (11.2 oz). The Cascadias became lighter in their new design this year, but in comparison to the other contenders, these are still the heaviest shoes tested. The weight comes from the additional protective features. Not only is the dry weight heavier than others, but when wet, the Cascadias absorbed a whopping 5.5 oz of water (more than previous versions). They also took the second longest to dry (~1.5 days). The ASICS, on the other hand, hold only 3.2 oz of water when wet. That said, both of these shoes are better cold weather options because they insulate and protect better than those that don't have the thicker uppers and overlays.

The Brooks Cascadia 12 is the heaviest shoe tested in this review. Both when dry and wet.
The Brooks Cascadia 12 is the heaviest shoe tested in this review. Both when dry and wet.

Sensitivity


Feeling the trail underfoot is important for most trail runners. Enhanced sensitivity allows you to be nimble and quick, re-adjusting your body on the fly to ensure healthy foot strike position. To test sensitivity, we ran hundreds of miles over all types of terrain to see how easily we could feel the trail underfoot. We even wore two different shoes on each foot for a direct comparison. In our tests, we learned that shoes with less cushioning and more flexibility did better than others.


The Most Sensitive
The Salming Elements scored a perfect ten in this category because of its super sensitive design. It lacks a rock plate and features minimal cushioning which allows the runner to feel every inch of the trail. This shoe is a perfect option for those who aren't concerned about protective features and are looking for a fast, sensitive race shoe.

Looking for the best sensitivity out there? The Salming Elements allows you to feel every part of the trail.
Looking for the best sensitivity out there? The Salming Elements allows you to feel every part of the trail.

The La Sportiva Bushido and HOKA ONE ONE Evo Jawz also scored high in this category. Both have a little more cushioning than the Salming Elements. While the Bushido uses a rock plate to enhance protection while increasing sensitivity, the HOKA ONE ONE Evo Jawz does not. If you're seeking sensitivity and protection, the Bushido is a great option. If you want a touch more cushioning underfoot, but still yearn for an intimate trail experience, the Evo Jawz may be one to consider.

Other Sensitive Yet Protective Options: Saucony Peregrine 7, inov-8 Roclite 305 GTX, Salomon Speedcross 4 (in the forefoot).

The Least Sensitive
If you are in the market for a shoe that isn't sensitive at all and completely protects you from the trail, the HOKA ONE ONE Challenger ATR 4 and HOKA ONE ONE Speedgoat are by far and wide the best options. The ample cushioning absorbs the trail allowing you to feel very little in the way of rocks and trail debris.

Conclusion


Enjoying the clay-mud trails of Bryce Canyon.
Enjoying the clay-mud trails of Bryce Canyon.

We hope you hit the trails in the best trail running shoe for you! Consider all the metrics above, what is important to you, and try on some options. The best shoe for you is the one that fits. We're just here to provide you with a little guidance, and I hope we've helped in your search for the best trail running shoe for you.
Amber King

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