The world's most in-depth and scientific reviews of gear

Best Running Socks of 2020

Friday August 28, 2020
  • Share this article:
Our Editors independently research, test, and rate the best products. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Learn more
Testing the 14 of best running socks for men and women has been fun over these last 3 years, and this update showcases 9 of the market's finest that'll keep your feet healthy and happy while tackling the miles. Putting them through the test, we've worn them all year, through all seasons, in climates ranging from the humid coast to the dry interior. We've post-holed up ridges, and ran the white line in Death Valley to avoid rubber melting temperatures. We wore different socks on each foot and took the time to meticulously evaluate architecture and construction. With over 1000 miles run in our tests, we offer you the best recommendations to keep you blister-free and performing on any trail or road running endeavor.

Top 9 Product Ratings

Displaying 1 - 5 of 9
≪ Previous | Compare | Next ≫

Best Overall Running Sock


Thorlos Experia XCCU


Editors' Choice Award

$14.07
(6% off)
at Amazon
See It

84
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort - 25% 9
  • Fit - 25% 9
  • Wicking & Breathability - 25% 8
  • Slip Prevention - 15% 7
  • Durability - 10% 8
Material: 66% THOR WICK COOL, 20% Nylon, 1% Elastic, 13% Polyester | Cushioning: Lightweight
Fits great
Wicks and breaths well
Perfectly placed padding
Comfortable
Not as grippy in the shoe as some
Low cut ankle sometimes doesn't protect on high back shoes

As the top overall scorer in our head-to-head testing, the Thorlo Experia XCCU is our top choice for the best overall running sock. We love its smaller size ranges, meaning that the fit is much more tailored to your actual foot size compared to other models with a broader size range. This sock has well-tailored padding in all of the right places that made us feel more than adequately protected on the sides of our metatarsals, and on our Achilles tendon. In areas where padding is not needed, the sock is made of thinner, highly breathable mesh that works exceptionally well at allowing your feet to breathe and stay dry. While many socks in this review also include targeted padding and breathable mesh, none were as successful as this model.

This sock also came with a few downsides. In particular, we thought it was exceptionally thin on the top and sides of the foot. There is nothing wrong with this fact, except that you need a snugger running shoe to accompany the slim fit of the sock if you want to avoid undue slippage while running. We highly recommend the Experia XCCU to any runner, although it will probably suit road runners more than those who favor trails. Experia also makes this model in different lengths, so if you prefer a slightly longer sock, check out the XCMU version or the crew-length XCXU model.

Read review: Thorlo Experia XCCU

Best Bang for the Buck


Balega Silver No Show


Best Buy Award

$13.73
(8% off)
at Amazon
See It

75
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort - 25% 9
  • Fit - 25% 8
  • Wicking & Breathability - 25% 5
  • Slip Prevention - 15% 9
  • Durability - 10% 6
Material: 75% Drynamix Polyester, 23% Nylon, 2% Elastane | Cushioning: Midweight
Great value
Cozy and Comfortable
Well fitted design
Padding is not specific
Does not vent well

The Balega Silver No Show offers a super cozy and comfortable experience at a reasonable price. The synthetic materials are soft and supple to the touch, wrapping your foot in what feels like a fleece snuggie blanket. Unlike Balega's Hidden Comfort model, it is more fitted with specific areas of compression that helps keep the sock's shape. The padding underfoot is quite protective, making it an excellent option for both trail and road running.

Unfortunately, this super comfortable sock isn't the most breathable option that we tested. Unlike other more intricate designs, it has full padding along the bottom of the foot with slits to offer some venting. However, we learned that in wet or super hot conditions, the sock holds more moisture than most. It does, however, wick well. While the architecture of this sock isn't as thoughtful as other contenders, the price is undoubtedly fabulous, proving to be of exceptional value.

Read review: Balega Silver No Show

Best for Comfort


Feetures Merino 10


Top Pick Award

$16.99
(6% off)
at Amazon
See It

79
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort - 25% 9
  • Fit - 25% 9
  • Wicking & Breathability - 25% 6
  • Slip Prevention - 15% 8
  • Durability - 10% 7
Material: Merino, synthetic | Cushioning: Lightweight
Targeted and plush cushioning
Great wicking ability
Super comfortable
Breathable
Tight and small fit
Cushioning holds moisture
Expensive

If you're seeking a mega-plush fabric that offers exceptional comfort, the Feetures Merino 10 is our favorite. As a lightweight contender, it provides a specific and targeted cushioning in the forefoot and heel, with a padded pull tab. Unlike most socks in this review made from 100% synthetic materials, this model integrates Merino wool, adding to its comfortable construction and features. The cushioning is super plush and responsive underfoot. It is sewn together in a high-density configuration that wicks away moisture efficiently, leaving more substantial areas of breathability where it matters the most. Some say this almost feels like a compression sock around the arch, though it's not advertised as such, making it an excellent option for both road and trail running in cool to warm weather.

The caveats? It feels pretty tight and runs a little small. While the toe box offers some flexibility, if you're in between sizes, we'd recommend that you size up. While the sock wicks away moisture from the foot, because of its tightly-knit configuration, it holds onto moisture in its cushioning. Your feet will stay likely dry, but it takes a while for the sock itself to dry out. We also think the price is a little high, but if comfort is your priority, this is still a good choice.

Read review: Feetures Merino 10

Best for Wicking & Breathability


Swiftwick Aspire Zero


Top Pick Award

$12.99
(13% off)
at Amazon
See It

76
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort - 25% 7
  • Fit - 25% 7
  • Wicking & Breathability - 25% 10
  • Slip Prevention - 15% 5
  • Durability - 10% 8
Material: 55% Nylon, 40% Olefin, 5% Spandex | Cushioning: Ultralightweight
Lightweight
Specific fit
Awesome wicking and breathability
Great for hot weather
Little cushioning
Some slippage

The hydrophobic olefin fibers, in combination with the Nylon materials, make the Swiftwick Aspire Zero our favorite sock for sweat-wicking and breathability. The construction provides ample ventilation that quickly moves moisture away from the foot, through the sock, and out. We are impressed with its specific fit and its lack of movement while running long and hard days. Even when wet, it dried quickly and kept our feet relatively dry. As a result, we recommend it for warm weather on terrain that doesn't require a whole lot of support or cushioning.

While it's hard to find anything truly wrong with this sock, we'd have to say the most significant caveat is simply in its intended construction. It's designed as a lightweight sock option, which may not be the preferred style for those who require a little extra cushioning. Also, while the material isn't very slippery, we noticed it does slip around in wider, sloppier shoes because it is so thin. So it does require a tighter fitting shoe to avoid this issue. Overall, this is a great running sock that has a wide range of utility.

Read review: Swiftwick Aspire Zero


Why You Should Trust Us


Andy Wellman and Amber King provide quality insights into running gear. Both are avid runners, participating in ultra-distance marathons. Andy has participated in 100-mile marathons, while Amber continues to train hard for 50-mile trail marathons that take place throughout the USA. They play in places from Oregon to Colorado to Ontario, visiting canyons, beaches, mountains, deserts, and more. Both have been gear testers and contributors to OutdoorGearLab for over six years, keeping tabs on the industry and testing new models, to make the best recommendations possible.

To determine the best overall pair, we put each sock through months of field testing and conducted objective in house tests to fine-tune our findings. We ran through all sorts of weather, battling technical trails and long days on the pavement. We tried different lengths, levels of cushioning, and banged out 1000s of miles throughout the country. Our team of tried and true testers looks at each sock comparatively, qualifying each with five essential performance metrics. After putting our legs through the "stuff," we provide you with an unbiased and quality overview of the best running socks on the market.

Related: How We Tested Running Socks

Running on the sand dunes in Death Valley National Park  we came to really appreciate the super tight 200 needle point weave of the Appalachian QTR socks because they didn't have big holes or mesh that allow sand to sneak in.
This sock does incredibly well wicking away moisture from the foot. The arch area provides a good mode of ventilation. That said  after this particular run  we noticed moisture building up in the pads of the sock  even though our feet stayed dry.
For us  running is typically a solitary activity that takes place in the mountains  giving time to reflect. Sometimes while out testing we have to set up our own photos  like we did on this beautiful fall day.

Analysis and Test Results


A great running sock can be the difference between a wet, blistered foot, and one that stays dryer and more comfortable while you tackle your mileage. It is the integral layer separating your delicate skin from direct contact with your shoes. Over the years, sock technology has improved, and today's designs are more thoughtful and ergonomic than ever. A great running sock will wick away moisture, breathe well, and provide a little cushioning along your forefoot and Achilles tendon. It'll also prevent slippage in your shoe, which aids in preventing blisters. Friction, heat, and moisture are blister causing agents that an excellent running sock will help to reduce. Finding the right model to keep you comfortable and your feet dry is crucial to allow you to keep churning out the miles.

Related: Buying Advice for Running Socks

Value


When it comes to running socks, it's important to look at the durability in addition to the price, which will inherently tell you which model will provide the best bang for your buck. The Balega Silver No Show is offered at a fair price with surprising comfort features. The Darn Tough brand is another to consider with its excellent durability and lifetime unconditional guarantee, even though it costs a few dollars more. The range of cost for socks is small, but the real value is in how many miles you can put in before needing a new pair.


Comfort


Comfort is the most crucial consideration when evaluating a running sock. How a sock feels will determine whether you wear it every day or never again. We began by examining each material's overall feel. Was it rough and abrasive, or soft and supple? Were there exposed seams that cause rubbing or friction? Does the sock hug our foot comfortably or squish the toes? Does the sock pinch around the ankle or the top of the foot, or does it stay in place with no discomfort? Where is the padding located? We ultimately determined the most comfortable option by evaluating the feel of the sock both in and out of our running shoes. We also took a critical look at where cushioning was targeted. Socks with padding aimed at all the right places were the most comfortable and scored the best in our testing.


We think that targeted padding in the forefoot, toes, sides of the toes, and the heel is the ideal makeup. If the rest of the sock around the arch and top of the foot is made up of thinner, more breathable material, the runner benefits from having that extra protection while not adding bulk and heat-trapping fabric. Padding tends to become a more valuable feature when you are running for longer distances, and also when the ground surface becomes rougher, like when trail or mountain running.

Joanne descends off the top of a snow-covered Bridge of Heaven in Ouray  CO testing our the Thorlos Experia with a tight and loose fitting shoe. During our testing  we took the time to really look comparatively at each product. Read on to learn how each running sock compares to the other. In this review  we look at both men and women's products.
Joanne descends off the top of a snow-covered Bridge of Heaven in Ouray, CO testing our the Thorlos Experia with a tight and loose fitting shoe. During our testing, we took the time to really look comparatively at each product. Read on to learn how each running sock compares to the other. In this review, we look at both men and women's products.

After 10+ mile runs, each sock still felt quite comfortable. Some even seem to get better the more miles we put on them. Of all that we tested, the Feetures Merino 10 was the most comfortable. Like the Balega products, the materials are super soft and comfortable, but this one features ultra-plush cushioning targeted to the ball of the foot, heel, and Achilles. While it feels more compressive than others, it certainly provided comfort for distances ranging from one mile to 20 and beyond. The fabric in the cushioned areas is highly dense, quite responsive, and protective underfoot.

Padding is minimal without any additional cushioning.
A look at the non-specific but plush cushioning that we absolutely LOVE slipping our foot into.

The Thorlos Experia XCCU offers targeted cushioning that is super soft to the touch. While the fabric isn't as plush as the Feetures Merino 10, this sock kept our feet protected and comfortable on the long runs. Both offer more cushioning overall, which adds to their comfort.

Here we see two different cushioning patterns. The Darn Tough Coolmax Vertex offers a consistent and perfect amount of cushioning  while the Thorlos (behind) has padding specific to the areas of impact to improve breathability.
Here we see two different cushioning patterns. The Darn Tough Coolmax Vertex offers a consistent and perfect amount of cushioning, while the Thorlos (behind) has padding specific to the areas of impact to improve breathability.

Socks with less cushioning typically didn't score as highly in this metric. Of the lightweight products tested, the Darn Tough Vertex Coolmax Ultra-Light is our favorite. While there are no areas of highly concentrated padding, there is an additional layer of material throughout the entire sock. The Coolmax polyester is little softer than the merino wool composition used in the Darn Tough Vertex UltraLight (women's version). We've usually found most Smartwool products to be pretty comfortable, but these ultralight socks don't feel as soft as the rougher Darn Tough fabric. Be sure to check out different cushioning options if you want a little more protection than these ultralight versions.

Ordering Different Height Socks and Cushion Levels
Although we mostly reviewed No Show or No Show Tab varieties of running-specific socks, those who would like mini-crew can usually still order the same sock with a different ankle height. Sock makers produce several varieties, so options abound in fabrics, thicknesses, ankle heights, and levels of cushioning. This review ranges from ultralight to lightweight, but there are more cushioned varieties available if this is what you seek.

Fit


How a sock fits is another critical component that relates to its comfort and performance. A sock that is too big or small is not going to be as comfortable as one that fits just right. The fit is determined by how well a sock might mold to your foot and stay in place. It should hug the foot comfortably without being too tight or loose. A sometimes overlooked aspect of fit is where your foot fits within a manufacturer's size range. Some companies manufacture a single sock design that is meant to fit a wide range of foot sizes.


We asked several questions to determine which sock fits best. Did it bunch up and force rearrangement after first pulling it on? Did it stay in place mile after mile, or did it creep down? Did it feel confining when first pulled on, or did it feel as if it wasn't there? How well did it move with the foot? Some socks have a lot of snug-fitting elastic sections that hug the foot. Others were too tight or loose at the ankle, giving us the feeling of circulation being cut off. Similarly, some socks overemphasized the amount of elastic in the arch, making it feel restrictive. The best socks feel comfortable and don't restrict movement. We also point out niches some socks occupy in the section below.

Here we see the Smartwool PhD Elite (left) with a much more specific fit than the Drymax (left). Both are supposed to be the same size.
Here we see the Smartwool PhD Elite (left) with a much more specific fit than the Drymax (left). Both are supposed to be the same size.

Our standout performer for the best-fitting sock out of the bunch is the Thorlo Experia XCCU, because its size range is relatively small, offering a versatile fit. It provides cushioning in the right places with a specific elasticity that ensures no slippage. Like the Feetures Merino 10, it stays in place on a long run, without bunching or moving on the foot. In general, the fit is not nearly as tight as the Feetures, which feels more like a compression sock.

Here we look at the compression around the arch. The Darn Tough (left) has a thinner  more specific band while the Swiftwick (right) has a wider compressive band. This changes the overall fit  with the Swiftwick being a little less tight and compressive.
Here we look at the compression around the arch. The Darn Tough (left) has a thinner, more specific band while the Swiftwick (right) has a wider compressive band. This changes the overall fit, with the Swiftwick being a little less tight and compressive.

The Darn Tough socks for both men and women also features a simple fit. The compression is in all the right areas and stays in place. When looking at the comparative size differences in the men and women's socks, the women's is more narrow with a tighter heel cup. If you're a woman with wider feet, we'd recommend trying on the men's sock. Both offer a size that is true to fit.

Here we look at the fit differences of different sock heights. Each sock typically has a different height  so if you're not a fan of the ultra-low cut  you can opt for a taller version and expect the same performance.
Here we look at the fit differences of different sock heights. Each sock typically has a different height, so if you're not a fan of the ultra-low cut, you can opt for a taller version and expect the same performance.

The Balega Silver No Show provides a surprisingly specific fit as well, unlike Belaga's Hidden Comfort model that just seems like a tube of padding. It has more specific compression around the arch with a little more padding around the Achilles and underfoot. Both are seriously comfortable with a unisex fit. Both fit a bit large, so if you're on the cusp, size down.

Wicking & Breathability


When water is trapped next to the skin, it gets absorbed, causing the feet to swell and soften, increasing the chance of blisters. To combat this, you need a sock that effectively wicks moisture and is able to breathe. Wicking is a sock's ability to effectively pull moisture from the skin to the outside of the sock, where it will hopefully evaporate. Whether or not it evaporates depends on both the breathing and venting capabilities of your shoe and the sock's ability to release moisture into the air. Some models can wick and breathe well, while others might wick, but not breathe so well. In this section, we look at the architecture of the ventilation systems to determine breathability and the fabric composition to access wicking ability.


The Thorlos Experia proves to offer immense propensity for wicking and breathability. Even after being knee deep in snow for over two miles our the cushioning underfoot still feels dry  even though the more breathable part of the sock is wet.
The Thorlos Experia proves to offer immense propensity for wicking and breathability. Even after being knee deep in snow for over two miles our the cushioning underfoot still feels dry, even though the more breathable part of the sock is wet.

The key to a sock that wicks well is using a hydrophobic (water-hating) fabric that can pull moisture from the foot and transfer it through the material. Models with a thicker looped thread or with some porosity at the material's surface tend to wick the best. Those that breathe the best are those with a thinner architecture with a loosely knit weave to increase surface area for water transport.

Nearing the top of Wildhorse Peak in the Uncompahgre Wilderness on an epic rainy day run. Having a sock that can keep your feet dry is key to avoiding blisters on this sort of a run.
Nearing the top of Wildhorse Peak in the Uncompahgre Wilderness on an epic rainy day run. Having a sock that can keep your feet dry is key to avoiding blisters on this sort of a run.

In this review, socks composed of synthetic material did the best at wicking. Specifically, those that integrate a high proportion of hydrophobic Olefin fibers. A previous award winner, the DryMax Running Mini Crew, stands out in this category, drying quickly and wicking stupendously well. However, this year, the Swiftwick Aspire Zero was able to dry quicker and manage moisture better. Another reason it wins an award is that it performs better in other departments like fit and comfort. This ultralight contender is super thin, wicking away moisture and keeping feet drier. Both are great options for wet, humid, or super hot conditions, with the DryMax being a little thicker in construction. The Darn Tough No Show Ultra-Light and Smartwool PhD Ultralight are two other competitors that wick quite well with a thin Merino wool construction.

While some socks have thoughtful cushioning patterns  the Swiftwick is simply thin all the way through  with a porous fabric that allows moisture to escape easily.
While some socks have thoughtful cushioning patterns, the Swiftwick is simply thin all the way through, with a porous fabric that allows moisture to escape easily.

Thicker socks wick well but don't offer the same level of breathability as thinner contenders. The Thorlos Experia XCCU is an exception that features an excellent venting system. The thicker fibers on the pads of the foot area grab moisture and move it effectively to the super-thin regions around the arch and top of the foot for optimal breathability. Other thicker socks like the Balega brand wick well, but unfortunately seem to hold the moisture in these denser areas, unlike the Thorlos.

Testing the wicking capabilities of different running socks  including the Balega Silver No Show  early Summer.
Testing the wicking capabilities of different running socks, including the Balega Silver No Show, early Summer.

Slip Prevention


The final component to avoiding blisters is its ability to reduce friction and heat by staying in place. When a foot slips inside a shoe, friction occurs — usually in the heel, under the ball of the foot, or between the toes. Friction creates heat, accelerating the creation of a blister. For this test, we are aware of how well a sock helps keep our foot in place. The interface between the skin, sock, and liner is crucial. So it's vital not only to get the right sock but also to ensure that your shoe fits correctly or that your liners aren't too slippery. A sock alone can't prevent blisters. It's a combination of the fit of your shoe, how you run, and how your sock and shoe interact.


Socks with added padding or cushioning, or thicker overall socks, tend to "fill" our shoes better than thin socks. For an optimal fit, you would be wise to run in the same thickness of socks regularly, and fit the shoes to the volume of your preferred sock. If you size your shoe wearing a medium thickness sock and then go running in an ultra-light sock, there'll be extra room for your foot to slip. To look at this metric, we tested different socks using shoes that both fit loosely and tightly. Socks that don't slip have fabrics that are more porous or plush, as opposed to streamlined, lightweight, and slick.

Here we test sock slippage on a particularly steep descent in Grand Junction  CO. The Feetures Merino 10 (worn on this day) do a great job at staying in place without allowing the foot to bump forward.
Here we test sock slippage on a particularly steep descent in Grand Junction, CO. The Feetures Merino 10 (worn on this day) do a great job at staying in place without allowing the foot to bump forward.

Of the socks tested, the Balega Silver No Show was the best at preventing foot slippage. The soft and supple drymax polyester does an impeccable job grabbing the interior of the shoe. The Feetures Merino 10 also has a plush exterior that can grab the shoe for more reinforced friction, though the threads are finer, so there's more slippage in looser shoes than the Balega Silver No Show.

Here we stop to adjust the Smartwool PhD Elite on a hot  sweaty day. This sock is slippery and somewhat small  making it slip down the foot.
Here we stop to adjust the Smartwool PhD Elite on a hot, sweaty day. This sock is slippery and somewhat small, making it slip down the foot.

The Thorlos Experia has an ultra-thin section of material along the top and bottom that is a little more conducive to slip in looser shoes, similar to the ultralight Darn Tough socks. While the Thorlos grip well underfoot, similar to the Darn Tough socks, the Darn Tough has a tighter weave to the fabric. The men's version is a tiny bit thicker than the women's version, grabbing the shoe better. Overall, the thicker and more fitted the sock, the better it combats slippage. If you plan on buying a thinner sock, like the Smartwool PhD Run Ultra Light Micro that slips quite a bit, just ensure that your insole offers some friction, or the shoe fits nice and tight to avoid blisters.

Durability


Durability is a key metric when considering which sock to buy. You don't want to throw down a wad of cash on a product that'll only hold up for just a couple of runs. In this metric, we look at the relative wear and tear of each sock after about 30 miles of testing. In some cases, where we've been testing socks for over the last few years, we can provide additional insight into the longer-term limits of each.


During this testing period, no socks showed any significant wear through the first 30 miles of testing, meaning that all running socks we tested are reasonably well-constructed. That said, they did show varying signs of wear and tear, which tells us there are differences in overall durability. We also look at the guarantees offered by different companies, which can be a point to consider when looking at value. The most valuable socks are those that will last the longest for the lowest cost over time.

"Trail" running in the winter in Colorado means you will be running on snow  really testing the durability of a running sock. Making it wet  then mashing it around  means that we can see which fibers stay intact  and which simply can't stand up.
"Trail" running in the winter in Colorado means you will be running on snow, really testing the durability of a running sock. Making it wet, then mashing it around, means that we can see which fibers stay intact, and which simply can't stand up.

Hands down, the best durability we've seen (with the best guarantee) comes from Darn Tough, which offers a lifetime no questions asked guarantee. If you wear a sock for a year and put a hole in it, you can send it back for a brand new pair. During our testing, this brand of sock showed the least amount of wear and tear, compaction, and piling issues, which lends to its standout durability. We've tested this brand of sock for several years and have gotten over 1000 miles on a single pair.

The Darn Tough fibers still look like new  even after 30+ miles of compaction in high use areas. We LOVE the quality of this product.
The Darn Tough fibers still look like new, even after 30+ miles of compaction in high use areas. We LOVE the quality of this product.

While Darn Tough does have a lifetime guarantee, we recommend supporting the success of the company. If you do happen to blow through a sock after you've thoroughly used and abused it, maybe think about buying a new pair…especially if it's already done a lot of work for you.

When testing the ultralight Darn Tough Sock, we saw the same level of durability. After our testing period, the sock still looks new with no threadbare areas or compaction, impressive for such a lightweight design. The ultralight version of the Smartwool PhD didn't fare as well, showing the signs of a hole in the making and frayed areas in both the forefoot and heel. The Swiftwick Aspire Zero, another lightweight contender, also proves to be ultra-durable with just a few thread fly-aways after 30 miles, but not much else.

Here we see the thread-bare Smartwool PhD that also earned itself the makings of a hole after just three runs. The lack of cushioning makes any sock less durable. We have had better luck with the cushioned version of this sock lasting for many adventures. We can't say the same for its lesser cushioned cousin.
Here we see the thread-bare Smartwool PhD that also earned itself the makings of a hole after just three runs. The lack of cushioning makes any sock less durable. We have had better luck with the cushioned version of this sock lasting for many adventures. We can't say the same for its lesser cushioned cousin.

While we are surprised at the durability of the thinner Darn Tough socks, thicker socks with more cushioning are inherently more durable and will likely last you longer. However, they are more susceptible to compaction. Of the thicker socks, the Drymax Running Mini Crew crushed the durability metric, looking like new after 30 miles, similar to the Darn Tough. The Thorlos Experia XCCU also provides decent durability, but we did notice some compaction after 30 miles, similar to the Feetures Merino 10. Some socks, like the Balega Hidden Comfort, lose their shape over time and use, becoming more stretched out and less elastic. In our testing period, this is the only sock that did this. Be sure you buy a sock that offers suitable durability.

All of the qualities that make a good sock: comfort  perfect fit  wicking ability  adequate padding  and slip resistance; they all become even more important the longer you run. Here we test socks -- and our feet -- during an ultramarathon distance race.
All of the qualities that make a good sock: comfort, perfect fit, wicking ability, adequate padding, and slip resistance; they all become even more important the longer you run. Here we test socks -- and our feet -- during an ultramarathon distance race.

Conclusion


The running sock that'll last you for miles is out there and is probably one that we've featured right here in this review. While there are are a plethora of options, make sure you choose a sock that'll cater to your needs. Quality will make a difference in your comfort and performance while on the run, so don't be afraid to spend a couple of extra dollars if a sock is reputed to perform well and last 100s of miles.

Andy Wellman, Amber King