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The Best Hiking Shoes for Women of 2019

Wild style and lots of exposed EVA in the Sky Arkali.
Thursday October 24, 2019
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What is the best women's hiking shoe available? To help you find out we researched 65 pairs available in 2019, then picked the top 14 for our thorough side-by-side testing process. We measured, weighed, tested, and hiked in every kind of terrain we could find to identify the top contenders from the rest of the pack. After miles and miles of hiking up, down, and across varied trails and rubble piles, we found the best for gentle trails, rugged terrain, light hiking, and extended adventures with a heavy pack. We also considered bad knees, high arches, wide feet, and cost, because we know you do too.


Top 14 Product Ratings

Displaying 1 - 5 of 14
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Awards Editors' Choice Award   Top Pick Award Top Pick Award 
Price $110.00 at Amazon
Compare at 3 sellers
$159.95 at Backcountry$70.00 at Amazon$112.95 at Amazon
Compare at 3 sellers
$199.95 at Backcountry
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Pros Comfortable, stable, great traction, durableVery comfortable, lightweight, waterproofGreat traction and stability, durable construction except for the lacesLightweight, versatile, great all-around performanceComfortable, adjustable heel/ankle, great traction
Cons Upper absorbs water (but doesn't leak), a little heavyNot the best traction, questionable durabilityDifficult to tighten the toe box due to the speed lace system, release button got jammed, a little stiffQuicklace system not our favorite, didn't feel great with a heavy pack onNot waterproof, runs wide, wild style may not be for everyone
Bottom Line The Sawtooth II excels at day hikes, longer adventures, and tricky terrain, making it an easy pick for our Editors' Choice Award.An exceptionally cushioned shoe that is also lightweight and waterproof.An excellent all-around hiking shoe that is waterproof and supportive.A great option for fast hiking / running.Hoka One One owns the comfort metric! The Sky Arkali is both cushioned and reponsive, and offers a dialed in fit, making it our Top Pick for Comfort.
Rating Categories Sawtooth II Low BDry HOKA ONE ONE Tor Summit WP Terrex Swift R2 GTX X Ultra 3 GTX Sky Arkali
Comfort (25%)
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Specs Sawtooth II Low BDry HOKA ONE ONE Tor... Terrex Swift R2 GTX X Ultra 3 GTX Sky Arkali
Weight per pair (size 7) 1.83 lbs 1.55 lbs 1.36 lbs 1.5 lbs 1.69 lbs
Width Options Regular, Wide Regular Regular Regular Regular
Upper Leather & textile Nubuck and suede leather Synthetic mesh Synthetic mesh MATRYX
Midsole Dual density EVA EVA and RMAT oversized midsole EVA Injected EVA PROFLY
Lining B-Dry eVent Gore-Tex Gore-Tex None
Sole Sawtooth Vibram Megagrip Hi-traction with 5mm lugs Continental Traxion rubber ContaGrip rubber Vibram Megagrip Hi-traction with 5mm lugs

Best Overall Women's Hiking Shoe


Oboz Sawtooth II Low BDry - Women's


Editors' Choice Award

$110.00
(21% off)
at Amazon
See It

85
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort - 25% 9
  • Support - 20% 10
  • Traction - 15% 9
  • Weight - 15% 5
  • Water Resistance - 15% 8
  • Durability - 10% 9
Weight: 1.8 pounds | Lining: BDry waterproof/breathable membrane
Comfort and stability
Waterproof construction
Great traction
Robust design
Absorbs water
A little heavy

The Oboz Sawtooth II hiking shoes are incredibly supportive and comfortable for all-day hikes, especially when carrying a 20-30 pound pack. The midsole is plush, and the proprietary insole (the best of the bunch) provides structured support, making the Sawtooth II an excellent option for multi-day trips. The lugs are chunky enough to shed mud and grab on loose surfaces, while the rubber is soft enough to grip rock slabs and logs. Oboz's BDry waterproof/breathable membrane kept our feet dry from rain and ventilated away sweat. One of the updates in this model (over previous iterations) are larger vents for increased breathability. While some hikers with a very narrow foot might want to wear a thicker sock for optimal fit, we appreciated having a little more room in the toe box to allow our toes to wiggle and splay. The shape of the upper combined with the shape of the insole holds the heel perfectly in place, minimizing lifting and rubbing.

The only thing we don't love about the Sawtooth II is the weight. It's the heaviest shoe we tested (though just by a bit), and in our bucket test, it absorbed a noticeable amount of water making it even heavier. If weight is a deal-breaker for you, then looking elsewhere is worthwhile. However, we believe that the extra protection, durability, and comfort of the Sawtooth II makes it well worth the added weight.

Read review: Oboz Sawtooth II - Women's

Best Bang for Your Buck


Merrell Moab 2 WP - Women's


Best Buy Award

$119.95
at Backcountry
See It

78
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort - 25% 8
  • Support - 20% 8
  • Traction - 15% 9
  • Weight - 15% 6
  • Water Resistance - 15% 8
  • Durability - 10% 7
Weight: 1.7 pounds | Lining: M-Select Dry
Comfort
Great traction
Breathes well
Requires breaking in
Runs short

The Merrell Moab 2 WP is a classic hiking shoe that continues to deliver year after year. It is relatively affordable, reasonably lightweight, and received top scores for traction. The ankle height is a little shorter than some of the other models we tested, allowing water to go over the top sooner, but we found the Moab 2 WP to be completely waterproof on the trail and in our "lab" testing. Indeed, this shoe does well in every category and at an excellent price.

We did find that the Moab 2 was not comfortable right out of the box. However, after a couple of short hikes, the fabric relaxed, allowing for more flex and less pinch. It also runs a little short, which is something to keep in mind if you are between sizes or like to hike in a thick sock. If you never require a waterproof shoe, you can save a little weight and a few dollars with the Moab 2 Ventilator, a nearly identical hiking shoe that does not offer water protection but is extra breathable.

Read review: Merrell Moab 2 WP - Women's

Top Pick for Being Light on Your Feet


Arc'teryx Aerios FL - Women's


Top Pick Award

$169.95
at Amazon
See It

78
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort - 25% 8
  • Support - 20% 7
  • Traction - 15% 7
  • Weight - 15% 9
  • Water Resistance - 15% 8
  • Durability - 10% 8
Weight: 1.25 pounds | Lining: Gore-Tex
Super lightweight without losing support
Comfort
Good traction on diverse terrain
Not an ugly hiking shoe
Not enough support for hiking with a heavy pack
Runs a little long

The Arc'teryx Aerios FL is an incredibly lightweight and performance-oriented hiking shoe that presents itself with a clean and minimalist style. It achieves this appearance with welds instead of stitching, and uniform-colored materials, from the upper to the laces to the rubber toe cap. More importantly, we are impressed by its performance on the trail, in a variety of terrain. The sticky rubber soles provide excellent traction on everything from loose, unconsolidated rubble to wet boulders, and the synthetic uppers held up well against lava rock and prickly desert shrubs. After many miles of hiking, the shoes are dusty but largely unscathed from our adventures.

Though we are impressed by the support of the compressed EVA midsoles for light hiking, we do not consider them to be supportive enough for days when a heavy pack is required. Because of the lightweight nature of the upper, we also wouldn't choose this shoe for multi-day trips or hikes on extreme terrain. When your itinerary is short and fast, or for any day that you want to be light on your feet, however, the Aerios may well be a perfect choice.

Read review: Arc'teryx Aerios FL - Women's

Top Pick for Aggressive Hiking


Salomon X Ultra 3 GTX - Women's


Top Pick Award

$112.95
(25% off)
at Amazon
See It

79
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort - 25% 7
  • Support - 20% 8
  • Traction - 15% 8
  • Weight - 15% 9
  • Water Resistance - 15% 8
  • Durability - 10% 8
Weight: 1.5 pounds | Lining: Gore-Tex
Good traction
Lightweight
Waterproof
Quicklace system is hard to fine-tune
Not enough support for hiking with a heavy pack
Runs a little long and narrow

The Salomon X Ultra 3 GTX is a part trail running shoe and part hiking shoe. While it has the look and feel of a trail runner, Salomon added more support in the heel and made the upper stiffer. The result is an excellent option for those who like to hike aggressively and cover lots of miles. The Gore-Tex liner and synthetic upper help keep your feet dry when splashing through streams and puddles. Moreover, it comes with a supportive insole. We especially appreciate the strategic lugs and reliable traction from the Contagrip sole in a variety of conditions, from loose dirt trails to rocky scrambles. This pair performed well across the board and in particular on fast hikes that required aggressive traction.

The X Ultra 3 doesn't have the same plush feel that some of the newer models with oversized midsoles provide, but it is never uncomfortable, and we like the support and stiffness in the heel when hiking downhill for miles. It did feel better without a heavy pack, though, and as such, it is recommended for day hikes, especially on diverse terrain, and for ambitious hikers who like to bang out the miles. The Quicklace system is not for everyone; some people love it, and some people hate it. If you don't mind the inability to fine-tune your laces, the Salomon X Ultra 3 is only ounces heavier than a typical trail runner, while providing a whole lot of extra control and support.

Read review: Salomon X Ultra 3 - Women's

Top Pick for Comfort


HOKA ONE ONE Sky Arkali - Women's


Top Pick Award

$199.95
at Backcountry
See It

79
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort - 25% 10
  • Support - 20% 10
  • Traction - 15% 8
  • Weight - 15% 6
  • Water Resistance - 15% 3
  • Durability - 10% 8
Weight: 1.7 pounds | Lining: eVent waterproof membrane
Modest weight
Super cushioned
Adjustable for a dialed-in fit
Not waterproof
Bold style may not suit everyone

Hoka One One's hiking shoes are setting the bar high for comfort. The Sky Arkali has a responsive and cushioned midsole, and we fell hard for the velcro adjusting straps on the heel and ankle that make for a perfect fit. The oversized soles look heavy but are not, and the shoes are remarkably supportive, sensitive, and agile. The Sky Arkali is a hybrid hiking and approach shoe, with sticky rubber soles and a protective rubber rand on the upper that offers excellent foot protection. We tackled lava rocks and steep trails confidently.

As with most shoes from Hoka, the Sky Arkali has a very roomy toe box. If you have a narrow foot, you may struggle to get these to fit well. There are a lot of lace holes to help adjust the fit (as well as those velcro straps), but they run wide, so a thicker sock may be needed. The Sky Arkali is not a waterproof shoe and leaked quickly in our bucket test, though we found they kept our feet dry on hikes in light rain. However, if waterproofness is as important as comfort, you may want to consider the Tor Summit, also from Hoka One One, which comes equipped with a waterproof liner. Lacking such a liner, the Sky Arkali is quite breathable, however, adding to its overall supreme comfort.

Read review: Hoka One One Sky Arkali - Women's


Scrambling around during shoe testing. The soft rubber that gives these shoes great traction also wears out faster than a stiffer sole.
Scrambling around during shoe testing. The soft rubber that gives these shoes great traction also wears out faster than a stiffer sole.

Why You Should Trust Us


Senior Review Editor Laurel Hunter has her basecamp one short block from the National Forest outside of Bend, Oregon, and has a couple of pups eager for daily trail miles. Laurel was raised by an avid outdoor adventurer and has been outside most of her life. Her obsessive pursuit of perfect gear is backed by decades of trail running, mountain biking, hiking, camping, and outdoor experience. Using her training as an artist, she thinks well outside the box for her gear testing and pays attention to every detail. When she's not reviewing gear for OutdoorGearLab, she is using gear on the trails right outside her home and dreaming of the perfect course for her mega pump track.

Cam McKenzie Ring also contributed to this review. Cam has spent years testing shoes with OutdoorGearLab, and has experience with dozens of women's hiking shoes. Her unique position of having witnessed first hand the trends and evolution of hiking footwear over the years gives her insight into this category that few others have. She's also no stranger to the outdoors, having spent a lifetime climbing and five years working for Yosemite Search and Rescue.

One of the traction tests: mossy rock slabs and wet logs.
Testing out this pair with some weight in our pack. There isn't much padding and little stability  and we slipped a lot on bare rock and loose trails.

Before testing these pairs, we researched the options. After looking very closely at over 65 different pairs of shoes from various manufacturers, we selected the 14 models discussed here, which we consider the most promising, innovative, interesting, and high-value pairs available. We then tested these hiking shoes for many months, hiking dozens of miles in each along the way. We wore them in a variety of terrain; from soft trails in the forest to scree-covered buttes to rocky scrambles. We tested each pair while wearing a light daypack and a heavier 20-30 pound load, wore them back to back on wet and technical scrambles, and carefully assessed all of their features along the way.

Related: How We Tested Hiking Shoes for Women

Side-by-side comparisons provides valuable insight.
Side-by-side comparisons provides valuable insight.

Analysis and Test Results


Following the testing period, we scored all shoes on specific criteria, including how waterproof and durable they are, and compiled all of our findings for you here. We'll go through each of our test metrics below, explaining why certain things like support or traction are important to consider, and which models excelled in which areas. All our scores are relative to the shoes included in this review.

Related: Buying Advice for Hiking Shoes for Women


Value


Gearing up for the outdoors can be an expensive endeavor. People used to buy one pair of leather hiking boots to last a decade or two, but today's hiking shoes typically last a fraction of that time. On the plus side, you will benefit from lighter materials and new technology. But if you hike a lot, you might blow through one or even two pairs a year! While the products in this review are not exorbitantly priced, if you're replacing them a couple of times a year, year after year, that expense adds up.

Our Best Buy winner, the Merrell Moab 2, is an excellent example of high value in hiking footwear. It gets the job done well enough in a variety of conditions and terrain without emptying your wallet. It's not the best, but for the majority of hiking objectives, it'll do just fine. Similar in many ways to the Moab 2, the North Face Ultra 110 GTX ranked pretty high in most categories, and at a similar price. The Moab has slightly better traction, and the Ultra 110 has a taller ankle opening to provide more protection and waterproofness. The Moab 2 is better suited for day hikes, while the Ultra 110 GTX is burly enough for multi-day excursions.

Another tip for finding value in hiking shoes is to consider if you truly need a pair of waterproof shoes. If you don't, most of the models in this review are available in non-waterproof versions, which tend to be significantly less expensive than their water-resistant counterparts. As a bonus, non-lined shoes almost always have better breathability, too, which is great for summer hiking.

Comfort


Comfort is queen when it comes to hiking footwear! We may squeeze our feet into some uncomfortable shoes for a night on the town, but when it comes to hitting the trails, it's imperative to have shoes that are cushioned and comfortable. Whether you are spending hours or weeks on the trail, a shoe's comfort will greatly impact your experience. An uncomfortable shoe is a dealbreaker, especially on a long or multi-day hike. Comfortable shoes are well-padded, supportive, and correctly sized. Too loose or too tight, and you'll end up with hot spots, pressure points, and blisters. A good fit is important, and also highly subjective, as what fits one person's long and narrow feet with high arches might not feel that great on someone else that has wider feet or a flatter arch. We tried to eliminate fit from our consideration for this score and instead considered factors that will affect every user, such as the amount, placement, and style of cushioning.


The standouts in this category are the Oboz Sawtooth II, the Hoka One One Tor Summit, and our Top Pick for Comfort, the Hoka One One Sky Arkali. All of these shoes have ample cushioning that is plush but not too soft. Both of the Hoka One One models have super thick midsoles to cushion your ride, and while the brand claims that the Sky Arkali is "responsive" cushion to the Tor Summit's "plush" cushion, both felt pretty darn cushiony compared to the competition. They absorb the impact of each step without feeling too soft or squishy. If you're looking for the most padding out there, a Hoka One One hiking shoe may be the shoe for you. They do have a distinct look that might not appeal to everyone, especially the Sky Arkali. As for the Sawtooth II's, they are less plush but provide a lot of cushioning and strategic support and perform exceptionally well when carrying a heavier pack.

The Sky Arkali is comfortable on the chunkiest of surfaces.
The Sky Arkali is comfortable on the chunkiest of surfaces.

Another critical factor for us in the comfort category is having ample cushioning under the entire foot. Though your heel tends to hit the ground first when walking on level ground, once the angle increases, most people step with their forefoot first. Some shoes, like the Keen Voyageur, have little to no forefoot padding, and that affected our overall comfort. Others, like the Merrell Siren Edge Q2 WP, have minimal padding throughout the sole, making that shoe the least comfortable option that we tested.

Hiking up steep terrain changes your stride  resulting in your forefoot hitting first. Shoes that lacked forefoot cushioning were noticeably less comfortable.
Hiking up steep terrain changes your stride, resulting in your forefoot hitting first. Shoes that lacked forefoot cushioning were noticeably less comfortable.

While we evaluate whether each shoe will work best for a narrow or wide foot, keep in mind that both the Editors' Choice, Oboz Sawtooth II and the Merrell Moab 2 also come in wide sizes, and are worth considering by those who need or prefer more width in their hiking shoes.

There is always variation in shoe brands with width, length, and shape, and it's a good idea to check the correlating European size if you are looking at European shoe brands, as the conversion is not always consistent. That being said, our size 7 shoes converted to a range of Euro sizes, from 37 1/2 to 38 2/3, but only the Salomon X Ultra 3 GTX - Women's and the Arc'teryx Aerios FL run noticeably longer than the rest of the group. Shoes that run a little short are the Merrell Moab 2 and the Merrell Siren Edge Q2 WP. It wasn't enough of an issue to require an exchange, but something to keep in mind if you run between sizes.

Support


As many features impact shoe stability, we considered several things when scoring each pair for support. We analyzed the support under the arch, the lateral stability and stiffness of the sole, and how well we could adjust the shoe with the lacing system. Hiking shoes are by nature less supportive than a full boot, so note that these scores are relative to each other and do not account for the support that you would get from a proper boot. If you have unstable ankles or plan on hiking with a heavy pack for prolonged periods, you will do better in a full boot.


When it comes to arch support, the shape of your foot will determine how much you want. If you have flatter feet and put on a shoe with a pronounced arch, it's not going to feel stable or comfortable at all! Conversely, little to no arch support can feel brutal to someone with regular to high arches. According to the Institute for Preventative Foot Health, only about 4% of the US population have "flat feet," or fallen arches. Since this condition seems to affect people who spend a lot of time moving on their feet (e.g., hikers and runners), it is probably more of a consideration for hiking shoe companies than other manufacturers. Still, having proper arch support from the get-go might be one way to avoid fallen arches later in life.

If you have flat and wide feet you might get enough arch support from the Ahnu Montara III  but they were a little bit too much of both for our liking.
If you have flat and wide feet you might get enough arch support from the Ahnu Montara III, but they were a little bit too much of both for our liking.

Some models have excellent arch support, like the Oboz Sawtooth II, Hoka One One Sky Arkali, and Keen Targhee III Low. The Sawtooth II comes with the best insole of the bunch, with extra padding and a molded arch that holds its shape. Those with flatter feet may want to consider the Ahnu Montara III or the Salomon OUTline, which have little arch support.

A range of insoles. The North Face insole is thin and minimal while the Oboz insole is structured and offers significant support.
A range of insoles. The North Face insole is thin and minimal while the Oboz insole is structured and offers significant support.

Lateral stability is also crucial in a hiking shoe because, unlike tennis or basketball where you move side to side, you are generally hiking in a forward direction. Additionally, if you are boulder hopping, scrambling, or hiking in rough terrain, you will benefit from a stable shoe. Stability results form a combination of the aforementioned internal arch support and also the flexibility and firmness of the sole. If you can wring a shoe around like a wet towel, its stability will leave a lot to be desired. While stiff soles are great for adding stability, if they are too stiff, you'll lose flexibility in the forefoot, which will make it harder to hike up steep terrain. Here again, the Oboz Sawtooth II stands out from the rest of the pack with ample flexion in the forefoot and limited side-to-side play.

Ample flexion in the Sawtooth II while remaining stable.
Ample flexion in the Sawtooth II while remaining stable.

While most of the shoes in our test group have good overall stability, there are a few that don't impress us that much. For example, the Merrell Siren Edge Q2 WP is so soft that we can twist it in half! While hiking shoes offer more flexibility at the ankle than hiking boots, you still want your foot to be secure with your heel in place. The uppers on shoes like the Oboz Sawtooth II and the North Face Ultra 110 GTX come up slightly higher on the top of the foot (along with the laces) which allows us to tighten the ankle opening sufficiently to keep our feet comfortably in the shoe while minimizing heel lift. The Hoka One One Sky Arkali takes the design up a notch by incorporating velcro straps for the ankle and heel that allow for dialed in support. Even the slightest heel lift can be a recipe for severe blisters over time, so if you can't get a good fit in that area, it'd be wise to consider a different pair.

When selecting your next pair  try the twist-test. If you can wring your shoe out like a wet towel  it's not going to be that stable. The Merrell Siren Edge Q2 is soft and pliable and doesn't provide much stability or support.
When selecting your next pair, try the twist-test. If you can wring your shoe out like a wet towel, it's not going to be that stable. The Merrell Siren Edge Q2 is soft and pliable and doesn't provide much stability or support.

Traction


Traction is a really important factor to consider in any hiking footwear. Slipping feet could land you on your rear end, contribute to twisted ankles, and severely limit the terrain you are confident in exploring. Knowing your shoes are up to the task helps you confidently move across varied terrain, too. Several things combine to affect a shoe's traction, including the stickiness of the rubber and the size and shape of the lugs. Vibram, the gold standard for high-end hiking shoe soles, literally makes dozens of different formulations with varying degrees of surface grip.


We primarily evaluated the traction on steep and unconsolidated dirt trails, but we also tested them on sandstone slabs, wet boulders, and lava scree. Above-average traction on dirt is usually achieved through deep lugs that can dig into the ground with each step. Having "multi-directional" lugs (ones that look like zigzags or arrow tips) will also help your soles grip in a variety of directions. We liked the traction best on the Merrell Moab 2 WP, Oboz Sawtooth II, and Adidas Terrex Swift. The lugs on these models are wide and grippy and work equally well on dirt and rock.

Aggressive lugs add traction on loose trails and help shed mud  but can add some weight.
Aggressive lugs add traction on loose trails and help shed mud, but can add some weight.

When it comes to traction on rock, the stickiness of the rubber usually has more to do with how well your feet can grip the surface rather than the shape of the lugs. Hard and stiff rubber doesn't grip as well as softer and more pliable formulations. The Merrell Moab 2 WP is a top performer on bare rock. The rubber is soft and sticky, and we scrambled all over rocky slabs in this pair without any slippage issues. Keep in mind that temperature can affect stickiness, and soft rubber typically does not perform as well in cold temperatures.

The flexibility of the forefoot will also affect traction. If you can't bend the front of your feet, or the sole is too thick to feel the rock (as with the Hoka One One Tor Summit WP), then you may have a hard time achieving secure footing. The Arc'teryx Aerios FL has a sweet spot between flexion and stability that works well for lightweight hiking.

The Merrell Moab WP has big chunky lugs that provide dependable traction  even on loose lava rubble.
The Merrell Moab WP has big chunky lugs that provide dependable traction, even on loose lava rubble.

Weight


The lighter we can keep all of our gear, the more enjoyable our whole experience will be on the trail. Hiking shoes are getting so light as to almost be on par with trail running shoes.


There is about a half a pound difference between the heaviest and lightest pair in our test group. This added weight might not seem like much (it's only four ounces on each foot), but we could feel the difference. So why, then, did we choose the heaviest model as our Editors' Choice winner? While we applaud manufacturers' attempts to move in lighter directions, sometimes that comes at the expense of other important factors like comfort, stability, and durability. The Salomon OUTline (1.19 pounds) is light but provides little cushioning or support, limiting its use to gentler travel. The Oboz Sawtooth II (1.83 pounds) feels heavy but has a molded heel counter and a thick and rugged sole. When it came to evaluating our favorite shoes, we realized that a slightly heavier shoe is not a deal-breaker if it gives us all of the other features that we want.

Lightweight and high performing! The Aerios were our favorite lightweight shoe that doesn't sacrifice support  comfort  and durability.
Lightweight and high performing! The Aerios were our favorite lightweight shoe that doesn't sacrifice support, comfort, and durability.

If you are looking for the lightest shoes that are also high performing, then consider our top pick for aggressive hiking, the Salomon X Ultra 3 or our top choice for being light on your feet, the Arc'teryx Aerios FL. These both strike a sweet spot between being lightweight but still supportive. While the X Ultra is a bit heavier, we especially love the aggressive and reliable tread. The Aerios wins as our favorite for the vast majority of light to moderate day hiking — these shoes provide just enough comfort and protection underfoot without weighing you down even an ounce more than necessary. The Adidas Outdoor Terrex Swift R2 GTX is another shoe that is both lightweight and high performing, and provides excellent stability.

Heading out for a hike with the dogs. These Hedgehogs are lightweight and won't weigh you down.
Heading out for a hike with the dogs. These Hedgehogs are lightweight and won't weigh you down.

We are also impressed with how lightweight the Hoka One One Tor Summit WP is. It looks like it is heavier because their soles are so thick, but the Tor Summit weighs in at 1.55 pounds for a US women's size 7.

Water Resistance


Many hiking shoes come in both a waterproof and a non-waterproof model. The best option for you depends on the climate where you live. Do you live in the desert and never plan to hike in the rain? Then forego the Gore-Tex and opt for a breathable pair with a mesh lining instead. While the technology in waterproof barriers, like Gore-Tex and eVent, helps vent your body's moisture (aka foot sweat) while keeping nature's moisture out, they still lead to hotter feet overall than a breathable mesh liner. Better to prevent the sweat from building up in the first place than having to worry about venting it. However, keep in mind that weather is unpredictable, and an afternoon rainstorm far from the trailhead can make for a soggy, uncomfortable hike. If you live in a wet climate or are planning any long trip into the mountains, a waterproof shoe is a necessity. We did a variety of tests to determine water resistance, including splashing around in streams and also a 10-minute bucket test with 3 inches of water in it. Most of the models that we tested are the so-called "waterproof" versions, but we also included a few non-waterproof models, including the Keen Voyageur and the Hoka One One Sky Arkali.


The first thing that stood out to us from our bucket test is that the technology of the waterproof barriers and uppers is really, really good these days. Almost all the shoes that claim to be waterproof are. While the bucket test doesn't 100% correlate to a real-world stream crossing, it does help to illustrate that if water is getting into your shoe when crossing a stream, it's most likely coming in from the ankle opening and not the upper or even the gusseted tongues.

Most of the shoes that claim to be waterproof are! So we looked at how much water they absorbed and how deep the water could be before it flowed over the top of the shoe.
Most of the shoes that claim to be waterproof are! So we looked at how much water they absorbed and how deep the water could be before it flowed over the top of the shoe.

To further refine our water-resistance score, we examined how much water the shoes seemed to absorb after the 10-minute bucket test, and how high off the ground the ankle opening sits. A higher ankle opening better protects from random splashes of water, and the absorption rate is also important. Your feet may stay dry, but if the material absorbs water the shoes will be heavier. Picture hiking in a light drizzle or through wet grass. If the upper sheds water with no absorption, that will maintain the shoes' dry weight, and keep your feet drier and more comfortable.

Of the waterproof shoes we tested, the North Face Ultra 110 has the highest ankle opening at 4 inches, whereas several models, including the Arc'teryx Aerios and the Salomon OUTline, have only about 3.25 inches. The Merrell Moab WP and Keen Targhee III have mid-range ankle height openings (3.5 inches), but their uppers absorbed a considerable amount of water. Therefore, we adjusted the scores down even though they are "waterproof."

A higher ankle height helps keep water from splashing in.
A higher ankle height helps keep water from splashing in.

Those shoes with a waterproof liner that did not fare so well include the Ahnu Montara III, and the Merrell Siren Edge Q2. The Montara has a shorter tongue gusset, so when submerged in three inches of water, it leaked at the low point. We couldn't pinpoint precisely why the Siren leaked, but it saturated through after about seven minutes in the bucket.

As for the non-waterproof mesh-lined shoes in this review, the Keen Voyageur and the Hoka One One Sky Arkali lasted less than 60 seconds in our bucket test. These shoes are in no way dunk-proof, but their uppers do shed light rain and dew, which may be enough for your hiking objectives. Additionally, the Sky Arkali's ankle opening is a whopping 4 5/8 inches high, giving some added protection from damp vegetation.

Durability


Often, hiking shoes will wear faster than any other piece of gear in your hiking arsenal. A typical pair with an EVA midsole lasts between 300-500 miles. If you hike only a few miles a week, it could take you years to get to that point, but regular hikers might go through one or two pairs a year. Those with polyurethane (PU) midsoles are thought to last longer, maybe even twice the mileage, but that extra durability comes at the expense of comfort. Normal wear and tear on any shoe packs down the midsole and wears down the outsole, so stiffer midsoles (like a dual-density EVA vs. a soft one) and harder rubber soles last longer overall.


While we couldn't put 500 miles on each pair for this review, we did hike in all of them quite extensively and inspected them for signs of damage or potential weak spots. Additionally, we read through online user reviews to identify any consistent wear patterns and looked through our friends' shoe racks to examine how similar shoes were faring after extended use. To reduce weight, a lot of midsoles are left almost entirely exposed. Since that material is softer than rubber, it is more prone to catching on vegetation, tearing out, or separating from the upper, so we looked closely for indications of early wear.

Exposed midsoles are a major weak spot for wear and tear  but help keep the shoes lighter than covering them with rubber.
Exposed midsoles are a major weak spot for wear and tear, but help keep the shoes lighter than covering them with rubber.

We also considered the various uppers used and how prone they are to snagging, unraveling, or other types of wear. While the cut-out leather and mesh uppers of the Oboz Sawtooth II and Merrell Moab 2 WP help keep the shoe ventilated, anywhere you can see the stitching is a potential point of weakness. Thankfully, those areas are double or even triple stitched and should stand up well to wear and tear. The synthetic uppers on the North Face Ultra 110 GTX and Arc'teryx Aerios FL impressed us with their abrasion resistance as well. Finally, it's always good to examine the toe box, as that's another area that is quick to wear out. A full rubber toe cap like the ones on the Keen Voyageur and Targhee III models can add some weight but will last longer than most.

Molded toe cap on the left  rubber toe protection in the middle  and leather on the right.
Molded toe cap on the left, rubber toe protection in the middle, and leather on the right.

The Oboz Sawtooth II has a 3-D molded heel counter to increase its longevity. This extra piece of rubber on the heel helps maintain the shape and structure of the back of the shoe and prevents it from caving in. Other shoes, such as the Adidas Outdoor Terrex Swift RT GTX, also have some rubber on the heel, improving durability.

The extra rubber on the heel might add an ounce or two to the overall weight of the shoe  but it helps prevent the heel area from caving in over time  and adds more stability to the shoe as well.
The extra rubber on the heel might add an ounce or two to the overall weight of the shoe, but it helps prevent the heel area from caving in over time, and adds more stability to the shoe as well.

Conclusion


With so many options available and features to consider, choosing the right pair of hiking shoes can be a challenging process! We hope we have helped you narrow down your choices and find the right pair for your next adventure, whether that's a hike close to home or a far-flung adventure.

Hard at work  testing the Merrell Moab WP.
Hard at work, testing the Merrell Moab WP.


Laurel Hunter & Cam McKenzie Ring