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How to Choose the Best Tent for Backpacking

Tuesday October 23, 2018

Determining which backpacking tent is best for your next outdoor adventure can be a difficult decision. It often requires a compromise between competing factors and answering certain questions. Where will you camp? What will the weather be like? How many other people (or animals) are coming with you? How much are you willing to spend? What are the most important features? The first, most important question, however, is what kind of shelter do you want?

There are two primary types of shelters: backpacking tents, that is, models that come with their own separate, dedicated set of poles, and ultralight tarps/shelters, that pitch with trekking poles and have extremely lightweight materials. Deciding between the two typically comes down to comfort and ease of set up on the one hand versus weight on the other. If a shelter spends more time on your back than you do inside of it, it may be worth looking into an ultralight shelter. However, if you spend more time inside a tent than you do carrying it, the added weight will be worth the extra space and comfort that typically comes with a traditional tent. Andrew Skurka, one of the world's most accomplished backpackers, describes the difference between camping and backpacking in a thought-provoking way here. In short, if you want one single tent for car camping and backpacking the kinds of tents in our Backpacking Tent Review will fit the bill. If you are serious about shaving weight, going "fast and light," then consider one of the minimalist shelters in our Ultralight Tents Review. Below we describe the pros and cons of both.

Backpackers often refer to the big three — the items that most affect your pack weight — specifically, the pack itself, the sleep system (usually a sleeping bag) and a shelter. If you have already decided to go with a tent, as opposed to a tarp or other ultralight shelter, then investing in a lightweight model can be one of the most cost-effective ways to reduce your total pack weight. This article describes the advantages and disadvantages of different types of tents and materials and addresses specific features to look for when selecting a tent.

The Big Agnes Copper Spur HV  REI Half Dome 2 Plus  and the NEMO Dagger 2 are out for a girl's weekend backpacking trip. While are three are coveted for offering a fair amount of weather resistance protection  we found that not only did we feel protected  but we were beyond comfortable.
The Big Agnes Copper Spur HV, REI Half Dome 2 Plus, and the NEMO Dagger 2 are out for a girl's weekend backpacking trip. While are three are coveted for offering a fair amount of weather resistance protection, we found that not only did we feel protected, but we were beyond comfortable.

Types of Shelters


Double-Wall Tents


Double-wall tents are defined by their three primary parts: (1) an inner tent with a waterproof floor and non-waterproof roof, (2) a waterproof outer tent (i.e. a rain fly), and (3) poles. Most double-wall tents are very easy to pitch, offer complete protection from the elements, and are comfortable. Unfortunately, they also tend to be the heaviest type of shelter. Double-wall tents come in three varieties, discussed below.

Freestanding tents


When you close your eyes and think of a tent, it is likely a freestanding model. They stand up entirely by themselves and don't need to be guyed out to achieve maximum volume. They are most often used for traditional camping but are also a good option if you will be out with one or more friends, or in areas where tree cover is sparse. More durable models can be used for harsh weather and winter camping as well.

Semi-freestanding tents


These tents have dedicated poles, but also require a couple stakes or guy points to pitch the shelter at full volume. This style is becoming increasingly popular because it offers the security and comfort of a double-wall tent, while also reducing weight by removing some of the pole structure.

Tunnel tents


Tunnel tents are technically a type of semi-freestanding tent but come with a unique pole structure. They have one or more hoop-shaped poles and rely entirely on guylines in order to stand upright. Tunnel tents generally have a higher space-to-weight ratio than other styles and offer a greater amount of comfort and strength for their weight.

The Big Agnes Copper Spur  NEMO Dagger (front row)  with the REI Half Dome 2 Plus and Tarptent Double Rainbow in the back.
The Big Agnes Copper Spur, NEMO Dagger (front row), with the REI Half Dome 2 Plus and Tarptent Double Rainbow in the back.

A few thoughts on doors: Within the myriad of double-wall tent designs, there are just as many subtle variations on door size, shape, and zippers. However, these styles can also be broadly broken down into three types: (1) Double side door (2) Single side door, and (3) front-end door. We consistently find that double side door tents — those with an entrance on each side — are the most comfortable and most versatile. If you are camping with more than one person, each having your own entrance and corresponding vestibule is superior. It also means that if you are setting up on a small or irregular tent site, there is more flexibility with the orientation of the tent. Front-end door tents also offer equal access to both people in a 2-person tent but are a little more awkward to enter and exit. Single side door tents are fine for individuals, but are by far the most uncomfortable if there are two or more people, since the person on the far side must climb over the person closer to the door.

Different types of double wall tents: front entrance  two door  and side entrance.
Different types of double wall tents: front entrance, two door, and side entrance.

The Big Agnes Copper Spur HV UL 2 was one of our favorite tents thanks to its lights weight and rosy doors.
The Big Agnes Copper Spur HV UL 2 was one of our favorite tents thanks to its lights weight and rosy doors.

Tarp Tents


Tarp tents are single-walled shelters with a built-in floor and bug netting. They pitch quickly, can be half the weight of a double-wall tent and offer complete protection from the elements. Their biggest drawbacks are that they are prone to interior moisture accumulation, meaning you might wake up wet in the morning and are the least adaptable type of tent since all of the parts are attached. Tarp tents pitch with dedicated poles, trekking poles, or a combination of the two. Tarp tents lie half way between backpacking tents and ultralight shelters.

The Tarptent Double Rainbow struggled in windy conditions  and it's not a tent we'd be keen to spend a stormy night in.
The Tarptent Double Rainbow struggled in windy conditions, and it's not a tent we'd be keen to spend a stormy night in.

Ultralight Shelters


Here we call any shelter that does not come with dedicated, flexible poles an ultralight (UL) shelter. Below we describe the pros and cons of various types of shelters and their accessories.

A-Frame Tarp


The tarp is the lightest, most adaptable, and most condensation-resistant type of shelter. Although there are dozens of types of tarps available, the A-frame arguably offers the greatest performance for lightweight backpacking for most people in most conditions. The catenary curve (the droop of fabric between its supports) is the crucial element that sets the A-frame apart from flat tarps (a flat, waterproof material with guy cords attached) and poncho tarps (you wear it and sleep in it). The catenary curve eliminates sagging from gravity and creates a very taut pitch with smooth and stiff walls that shed wind very well. You get a tighter pitch with less tension and less effort.

Like lightweight double-wall tents, A-frame tarps are usually wider at the head than the foot. They have two open ends so it's important to find sheltered campsites during high winds and driving rain. The A-frame's open ends are both an advantage and disadvantage. If unprotected, the shelter is unsuitable for use in very exposed, high wind conditions. Yet the open ends also allow the tarp to be pitched in many different ways: high up off the ground, over a picnic table, to cover a lean-to opening, or you can use it as a ground cloth when the weather is nice. Modular inserts and beaks (vestibules) can bolster the storm resistance of A-frame tarps. Although we don't evaluate shelters on their ability to immerse the sleeper in a wilderness experience, our testers find tarps to be the most satisfying type of shelter to sleep in when they are looking for a "close-to-nature" adventure. A-frames can be pitched with trekking poles, paddles, and dedicated aluminum or carbon fiber sectional poles (sold separately).

The Mountain Laurel Designs Cuben Fiber Grace Tarp in a well protected forest. Here there's no need for side walls to shed wind or rain because the campsite prevents horizontally blown rain.
The Mountain Laurel Designs Cuben Fiber Grace Tarp in a well protected forest. Here there's no need for side walls to shed wind or rain because the campsite prevents horizontally blown rain.

Cuben fiber flat tarps can be set up as A-frame shelters as well and are the most adaptable type of ultralight shelter. Tarps are the safest type of shelter in serious exposed three-season storms because they can be pitched very close to the ground and trekking poles are much stronger than dedicated pre-tensioned poles.

Pyramid Tarp


Pyramids, or "mids", are arguably the strongest and most weather resistant type of UL shelter. They pitch with one or two poles (trekking poles, paddles, or dedicated sectional poles), are enclosed on all sides, have steep walls that shed wind and snow, and offer excellent weather protection. Mids are the top choice for serious wilderness expeditions in foul conditions, yet — like any four-season tent — they can also be used in three-season conditions.


Mids are limited to one pitching configuration, are heavier and more prone to condensation than most tarps, but they offer the greatest weather protection and added privacy over an A-frame style. Mountaineers often use mids for group cook tents. Most mids are available with model-specific modular components, which can make them more versatile.

Large mids are frequently used for group shelters on mountaineering trips  such as on Mt. McKinley  Alaska  shown here.
Large mids are frequently used for group shelters on mountaineering trips, such as on Mt. McKinley, Alaska, shown here.

Materials



Fabrics


Backpacking tent floors and flies are made from, in increasing order of performance: coated polyester, coated nylon, and cuben fiber. Nylon is generally stronger and more abrasion resistant than polyester. Both materials require a coating to become waterproof. A fabric's denier (D) is a rough indicator of its weight per square area. The lightest tent fabrics are 10D, most tent floors are made of 40-70D, and expedition duffel bags are made of 1,000D. We list the floor and fly fabric and coating in the specifications table for each tent.

Polyurethane (PU) coated fabrics


PU is the coating of choice for all budget tents because it is the cheapest way to achieve a waterproof fabric with reasonable durability in cold and wet conditions. Unfortunately, the PU coatings found on less expensive tents are susceptible to hydrolysis (chemical breakup), which eventually destroys the waterproof coating. The wetter and warmer the conditions, the faster hydrolysis takes place. The fabric becomes sticky and the PU may flake off when its dry. The best mountaineering tents and some tarp inserts have PU formulations with polyether, which makes them highly resistant to hydrolysis.

Polyurethane coated fabrics are susceptible to hydrolysis  or chemical breakup. Eventually they lose their water resistance. This photo shows the free stuff sack included with the Sierra Designs Zissou sleeping bag after two months of use.
Polyurethane coated fabrics are susceptible to hydrolysis, or chemical breakup. Eventually they lose their water resistance. This photo shows the free stuff sack included with the Sierra Designs Zissou sleeping bag after two months of use.

SilNylon


Silicone elastomer coated nylons are used on all high-quality backpacking and mountaineering tents. SilNylon is highly water repellent, elastic, and UV and temperature stable. SilNylon is considerably stronger, lighter, and more durable than PU coated fabrics. It's also much more slippery than PU, which makes it an ideal choice for winter applications because snow slides off very easily. Silicone is widely regarded as the best coating for nylon fabrics used for pack tents. The Hilleberg Anjan 2 GT uses silicone treated nylon fabrics.

Unfortunately, for the budget conscious consumer, silicone is more expensive than PU and coating a fabric with it takes longer than coating a fabric with PU. Furthermore, it's difficult to stick things to SilNylon, which means that the seams on silicone coated fabrics can't be factory taped. Thus, most "good quality" tents from major manufacturers use nylon that's coated with silicone on the outside and PU on the inside (the PU is then seam taped). The Big Agnes Copper Spur and Flycreek models, and MSR Hubba Hubba have this coating combination.

Double-sided silicone coated fabrics are lighter, stronger, and more durable than PU/silicone combinations. They're usually sewn in a way that provides good water resistance along the seams, but are hand sealed with a liquid sealant, such as McNett SilNet, which yields a final product with the greatest water resistance and can also increase the strength of the seam. All but two of the sixteen double wall tents tested here have Sil/PU combination or just PU fabrics. One drawback to double sided SilNylon tents is that they can't be repaired with adhesive tapes, such as duct tape or Tenacious tape. They must be sew-patched or bonded with silicone, which takes longer than adhesive tapes.

SilNylon is the ultimate blend of performance and value. It stretches when it gets wet  however  and guy points needs to be re-tightened frequently. Mountain Laurel Designs DuoMid shown in Glacier National Park.
SilNylon is the ultimate blend of performance and value. It stretches when it gets wet, however, and guy points needs to be re-tightened frequently. Mountain Laurel Designs DuoMid shown in Glacier National Park.

Cuben Fiber


Cuben fiber, or non-woven Dyneema (NWD) is the lightest, strongest, and most durable waterproof material currently used in the outdoor industry. Cuben fiber laminates unidirectional tapes of in-line plasma treated Dyneema fibers spread to mono-filament level mylar films with titanium UV protection. In other words, Dyneema threads (50-70% lighter and 400%+ stronger than Kevlar and 1,500% stronger than steel per unit weight) are sandwiched between tough UV-resistant Mylar. Unlike SilNylon, cuben fiber doesn't stretch, which means that you don't need to retighten a tent's guylines as frequently. Cuben fiber can be repaired quickly with adhesive tape, and doesn't absorb water, which means your tent won't get heavier if you have to pack it up in a rainstorm. It weighs less than half as much as most SilNylons and it is translucent, which means you can see the stars through it. Cuben fiber is arguably the best waterproof material for lightweight backpacking shelters. It's most commonly available from cottage industry companies but major manufacturers, such as Sierra Designs and Easton, are beginning to incorporate it into their products more and more.

Although many consider cuben fiber to be a miracle fabric, it does have several drawbacks. The most significant is its price: it's roughly four times as expensive as SilNylon! Since cuben fiber doesn't stretch, it can be harder to pitch a shelter because you can't force it tight in sub-optimal pitching conditions. (SilNylon and PU coated nylon can be stretched into shape.) It's also less heat resistant than nylon (requires more care when cooking inside the tent) and isn't as slippery as SilNylon (less ideal for winter conditions). Because it doesn't stretch, cuben fiber is more prone to puncture than SilNylon, but if it does puncture (highly unlikely while backpacking) it's so strong that it's unlikely to tear. These drawbacks are largely trivial for three-season hiking and climbing, where campsites are abundant and snow infrequent. For many people, choosing between SilNylon and cuben fiber will come down to weight versus cost.

Cuben fiber is exceptionally durable and ludicrously strong. The stuff sack shown here at right was used literally everyday for 9 months for everything from storing food to clothes  sleeping bags to toiletries. The one at left is brand new.
Cuben fiber is exceptionally durable and ludicrously strong. The stuff sack shown here at right was used literally everyday for 9 months for everything from storing food to clothes, sleeping bags to toiletries. The one at left is brand new.

Poles


Wild and crazy pole structures are a popular trend in double-wall tent design. These days, most major manufacturers partner with DAC, a Korean aluminum firm, for help with tentpole designs and/or to supply the poles for a specific model. Most of the poles included with the tents we tested are good quality. Some are lighter and stiffer than others, but none of them are objectively bad. For the most part, higher quality tents come with higher quality poles. Most of the models tested here use aluminum from either Easton or DAC. We believe that a tent's pole design and the fabrics used in the tent are much more important to the overall integrity of the tent than the type of pole material. However, one important thing about poles is the length of each segment. The longer the sections the harder they are to pack inside small spaces. We list the number, material, and diameter of poles in our specifications. Our experience tells us that a hubbed design like that of the REI Half Dome 2 Plus, is often the weakest point of a pole set for a few reasons. They are almost always made of cheap plastic, the poles must often pivot around that point to pitch the tent properly, and the hub is unidirectional (and not intuitive), which means it is easy to turn it in the wrong direction, stressing that point even more. If a pole fails at that hub point, it is difficult to repair with the included pole splint since the splint's diameter is too large to fit into the plastic hub. On the plus side, if the hub itself breaks, the tent is still operational.

The poles for (left to right): The Copper Spur  Flycreek  SuperMega  Mica and Double Rainbow. The SuperMega UL poles sections were noticeably longer than the rest which made them more difficult to pack.
The poles for (left to right): The Copper Spur, Flycreek, SuperMega, Mica and Double Rainbow. The SuperMega UL poles sections were noticeably longer than the rest which made them more difficult to pack.

Do You Hike with Trekking Poles?

We highly recommend trekking poles for backpacking. See our 10 Reasons for Trekking Poles article. Among other reasons, they provide extremely strong and reliable support for a tent that adds zero weight to your pack. See our Trekking Pole Review for the best trekking poles. In general, trekking poles are significantly stronger than pre-tensioned poles that come with double-wall tents; they're much safer in serious storms because they don't break. Tents with dedicated poles are best for circumstances when you aren't already carrying something to support your tent, such as when bicycle touring, kayaking, or car-camping.

Stakes and Guylines


For 3-season freestanding, double wall tents, stakes and guylines are important, but not critical. For any other type of shelter, it really pays to have high-quality versions of these often overlooked components. Unfortunately, we find that shelters often do not come with an adequate amount of guyline. Quality stakes are relatively easy to come by, but similar to the line, companies almost never include one stake for every guy point on their shelter. In order to achieve a proper pitch, you'll likely need to get more guyline and/or stakes. Most tarp shelters don't include stakes and only a few models we tested come with quality guyline. Good stakes and cord can still be extremely light and strong and increase the longevity of a shelter (we've found that most accidental damage occurs when a guy cord comes undone, breaks, or a stake pulls out). We recommend Carbon Core Tent Stakes or high load guy points.

Many thru-hikers use rocks, sticks, and convenient vegetation instead of stakes, but if you're not planning on a 2,000-mile hike, a complete set of high-quality stakes is worth it. For guy cord, we like Kelty TripTease LightLine.

Tent stakes : MSR Cyclone (35g) Toughstake (33g)  MSR Snowstake (22g)  DAC Y (14g)  Easton Nano Nail (9g)  DAC V (11g)  MSR Mini Groundhog (9g)  Hilleberg Tri-peg (8g)  Vargo 6.5" Titanium (8g)  MSR Carbon Core (5.5g)  Easton Full Metal Jacket (5.5g).
Tent stakes,: MSR Cyclone (35g),Toughstake (33g), MSR Snowstake (22g), DAC Y (14g), Easton Nano Nail (9g), DAC V (11g), MSR Mini Groundhog (9g), Hilleberg Tri-peg (8g), Vargo 6.5" Titanium (8g), MSR Carbon Core (5.5g), Easton Full Metal Jacket (5.5g).

The Follies of Fast-Pitching with a Footprint

Although manufacturers tout their tents' fast-pitch weight (using an optional footprint with poles and a rain fly) we don't believe this type of shelter is viable for backpacking in wind or rain. Compared to floorless tents, fast-pitching has two significant limitations: (1) it's a much weaker configuration, and (2) it's much less weather resistant. Most double-wall tents have a specific inner tent that supports the pole structure and have 4-8" waterproof walls that protect against splashback and horizontally blown rain. Footprints are cut to match the inner tent's floor dimensions, so if you are fast-pitching a tent in the rain, water almost always lands on the footprint, creeps inward, and gets you wet. Grommets in the footprint provide the support for the poles, so you can't fast-pitch without a footprint or roll the footprint back from the dripping rain. Furthermore, since most outer tents attach to the poles from the outside with velcro, fast pitching is inherently weak, and made weaker by the fact that many outer tents have no means to connect to the poles— they may only clip to the footprint—and, therefore, guying the outer tent out is completely useless. For these reasons we don't believe that fast-pitching a tent is viable for serious backpacking. It's largely just a marketing gimmick.

However, the Hilleberg Anjan and MSR Hubba Hubba NX are dedicated pole-supported tents in our review finalists that can be used without their inner tents in significant rain or wind and can be pitched in a floorless configuration. We like this floorless configuration because it is stronger than the typical "fast-pitch" and does not require purchasing a separate footprint.

The Hilleberg Anjan (left) and the Hubba Hubba NX (right) are the only tents that pitch in a floorless configuration  which increases versatility and reduces weight  and is much stronger  lighter  and more weather resistant than "fast pitching" with a footprint.
The Hilleberg Anjan (left) and the Hubba Hubba NX (right) are the only tents that pitch in a floorless configuration, which increases versatility and reduces weight, and is much stronger, lighter, and more weather resistant than "fast pitching" with a footprint.

Comparing Tents and Ultralight Shelters



Weather Resistance


Double-wall tents provide excellent protection from all of the elements but they don't tend to be as strong or as durable as ultralight shelters that just come with fewer parts to break. Many tents try to be both spacious and lightweight, which results in a huge reduction in static strength.

Comfort


How much comfort we need and want varies highly based on our experience camping, how much time we plan to spend in our shelter and what we believe to be an acceptable level of protection from the elements. If a "true wilderness experience" is a primary objective, ultralight shelters offer a much greater connection to nature. When used with the right combination of accessories (bivy, insert, head net, etc.) shelters offer lots of comfort, though these accessories add complication and weight. If you are just starting out and want something that feels homier and is easier to pitch, a double wall tent is a good starting point.

The NEMO Dagger and Big Agnes Copper Spur were two contenders that scored high for comfort  earning a 9 and 7  respectively. The Dagger's high sidewalls and open ceiling provided optimal comfort  while the Copper Spur provided plenty of space.
The NEMO Dagger and Big Agnes Copper Spur were two contenders that scored high for comfort, earning a 9 and 7, respectively. The Dagger's high sidewalls and open ceiling provided optimal comfort, while the Copper Spur provided plenty of space.

Durability and Versatility


What we require from a tent varies with location and weather conditions. One night we might need protection from vertically falling rain. Another night it might be windy without rain. And another night the skies may be clear with no wind, all we need is bug protection. Tents that can adapt to varying conditions, or be used in locations that don't permit a perfect pitch, can save time, money, and energy. Most double-wall tents are not adaptable. They must pitch in the same configuration every time. Shelters offer much greater adaptability. Flat tarps are the most adaptable followed by versatile tarps like the MLD Trailstar, A-frame tarps, and mids.

OutdoorGearLab tests the Copper Spur HV alongside the NEMO Dagger 2. Both earned 8 out of 10s for their remarkable durability in Montana and the Sierras.
OutdoorGearLab tests the Copper Spur HV alongside the NEMO Dagger 2. Both earned 8 out of 10s for their remarkable durability in Montana and the Sierras.

Weight and Packed Size


All of our contenders. From left to right: NEMO Galaxi  Alps Lynx  REI Half Dome 2 Plus  Eureka Midori  Sierra Designs Clip Flashlight  Big Agnes Copper Spur HV  Hilleberg Anjan  NEMO Dagger  Tarptent Double Rainbow  Kelty Salida 2  and Marmot Catalyst.
All of our contenders. From left to right: NEMO Galaxi, Alps Lynx, REI Half Dome 2 Plus, Eureka Midori, Sierra Designs Clip Flashlight, Big Agnes Copper Spur HV, Hilleberg Anjan, NEMO Dagger, Tarptent Double Rainbow, Kelty Salida 2, and Marmot Catalyst.

Ultralight shelters are much lighter and more compact than tents. The difference is tremendous. Shelters are much more portable.

The REI Half Dome 2 Plus  HIlleberg Anjan  Big Agnes Copper Spur  NEMO Dagger  Sierra Designs Clip Flashlight  and Tarptent Double Rainbow - the award winning line-up.
The REI Half Dome 2 Plus  NEMO Dagger  Sierra Designs Flashlight  Big Agnes Copper Spur  Tarptent Double Rainbow  and Hilleberg Anjan GT - the award-winning line-up.

Ease of Set-Up


Typically double wall tents are much easier to set up than an ultralight shelter. Usually, these shelters are not free-standing and require complicated guy line systems and using trekking poles.

The Dagger  one of our Editors' Choice winners  scored well in ease of set up. The single  hubbed pole design allowed us to set this tent up in under four minutes - at a casual pace.
The Dagger, one of our Editors' Choice winners, scored well in ease of set up. The single, hubbed pole design allowed us to set this tent up in under four minutes - at a casual pace.

Tent Use and Care Tips


Storage

Fabric coatings break down faster if tents are stored wet, are subject to lots of abrasion, or are made with ultralight (read: ultrathin) construction. Dry a tent completely before storing it (mold and mildew are also big factors here) and fold and roll it up with the poles inside every time. The haphazard stuff method is fine for the trail, but neatly rolling the tent for longterm storage will increase its longevity.

Pitching

Guy out all lines. Add extra cord if needed and make mid-level guylines at least 6' long. It can be useful to add extra cord to vestibule and ground level guy loops. Add big rocks or logs on top of stakes, or substitute rocks, logs, or vegetation for stakes. If it's storming hard it's often worth waking up at regular intervals to check guyline tension and staking. If you're in a weaker tent in a bad storm, you can sit up and support the walls with your hands to prevent the poles from breaking. In terribly high winds that you don't think your tent can handle, it's best to take it down and wrap yourself in the rainfly.

Site Selection


We believe that everyone should know and follow Leave No Trace Principles when they are in the backcountry. When choosing a site to camp, plan ahead and look at a map a few hours before you plan to stop for the night. Identify possible sites that will follow LNT principles that are:
  • Off-trail: this shows respect for other users by giving people space, it also reduces impact on sites right beside the trail
  • Flat: These areas on the map may already have established campsites, especially if they are near water
  • Somewhere breezy (if it's buggy)
  • Not in the bottom of a valley, where the air will be colder and dew and frost greater
  • Not near animal paths or prime habitat
  • Away from hazards like flooding, rock fall, and avalanches
  • Away from water - don't contaminate everyone's water source!

Consider other ways topography will influence environmental conditions. Will a long valley become a wind tunnel? Where will precipitation flow to and accumulate?

Choosing a durable surface such as gravel to camp on follows Leave Not Trace Principles.
Choosing a durable surface such as gravel to camp on follows Leave Not Trace Principles.

On a micro level, choose a site that is:
  • On dry ground, because when your shelter is wet, you will get colder faster and you may end up with more condensation in your tent
  • On durable surfaces such as granite slabs, duff, or gravel
  • At least 200 feet from water
  • Near or under an object, like a rock, tree or bushes, that will act as a windbreak
  • Slightly convex, draining away from your tent a rainstorm rather than pooling underneath it


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