Reviews You Can Rely On

Best Camping Tent of 2021

We tested the best car camping tents from Marmot, The North Face, MSR, and more to help you get cozy out in nature
Photo: Rob Gaedtke
By Rob Gaedtke ⋅ Review Editor
Wednesday August 4, 2021
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Looking for the perfect camping tent? We've got you. Over the past decade, our team has reviewed 30+ tents with the top 13 in this 2021 review. See which ones stood up to our rigorous testing as we take you on a deep dive into the inner workings of the camping tent market. We put these tents to the test across some pretty rugged terrain and, most recently, the complicated environment of a family, teenagers, and two moderately trained dogs. With the help of our years of experience, we've gathered all the information you'll need to pick the perfect tent for your next outdoor adventure.

Top 13 Product Ratings

Displaying 1 - 5 of 13
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Awards Editors' Choice Award Top Pick Award Top Pick Award Top Pick Award  
Price $643 List$449.95 at Backcountry
Compare at 3 sellers
$499.95 at REI
Compare at 2 sellers
$469.00 at REI$499.00 at REI
Overall Score Sort Icon
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Pros Massive interior, great construction, easy to pitchSpacious, great layout, durable, very family friendly, high valueQuality materials, great height, perfectly sized vestibuleHuge doors and large vestibule, lots of pockets, highly weather resistantTall and spacious, quonset hut-shaped, lots of pockets, adjustable room divider
Cons Expensive, odd ceiling pocketsNot the easiest to pitch, only one door, odd bagHubebd poles, single door, awkward bagRuns warm, views are a bit more restrictedOnly one vestibule, back door is more exposed to the elements, lots of poles
Bottom Line The best balance of size, quality, style, and ease of use we've foundThis tent has one of the best uses of space we have ever seen, a great choice for families or campers with lots of gearAn ultra high-quality 4-person tent that makes great use of spaceAn excellent mountaineering-inspired tent that is ready for both inclement weather and summer funA well designed tent with tons of room and lots of versatility
Rating Categories Marmot Halo 6 The North Face Wawo... MSR Habitude 4 REI Co-op Base Camp 6 REI Kingdom 6
Space And Comfort (35%)
9.0
9.0
8.0
8.0
9.0
Weather Resistance (25%)
9.0
8.0
9.0
9.0
7.0
Ease Of Use (15%)
8.0
7.0
8.0
8.0
7.0
Durability (15%)
9.0
9.0
9.0
8.0
7.0
Family Friendliness (10%)
8.0
9.0
7.0
8.0
9.0
Specs Marmot Halo 6 The North Face Wawo... MSR Habitude 4 REI Co-op Base Camp 6 REI Kingdom 6
Weight 21.0 lbs 21.9 lbs 12 lbs 20.625 lbs 20.6 lbs
Max Inside Height 6' 4" 6' 6" 6' 1" 6' 2" 6' 3"
Floor Dimensions 9'10" x 9'10" 10' x 8'6" 7'11" x 7'11" 9'2" x 9'2" 10' x 8'4"
Floor Area 96.7 sq ft 85 sq ft 62.4 sq ft 84 sq ft 83.3 sq ft
Seasons 3-season 3-season 3-season 3-4 season 3-season
Windows Mesh top 2 2 Mesh top 1
Pockets 8 6 7 14 22
Number of Doors 2 3 1 2 2
Room Divider No Yes No No Yes
Vestibules 2 2 1 2 1
Vestibule Area 32 sq ft 44.7 sq ft; 21 sq ft 23.5sq ft 40 sq ft 29 sq ft
Packed Size 25" x 14" 9.5" x 16.5" x 25.5" 23" x 9" x 9" 11" x 24" 9.5" x 16.5" x 25.5"
Floor Materials 70D nylon 75D polyester DWR 68D polyester taffeta Polyester Coated polyester oxford
Main Tent Materials 40D polyester No-See-Um mesh, 68D polyester ripstop 150D polyester taffeta 68D polyester ripstop, DWR, PU Polyester Nylon/mesh
Rainfly Materials 68D polyester ripstop 68D polyester 68D polyester ripstop, DWR, PU Polyester Coated polyester taffeta
Number of Poles 4 4 3 hubbed 5 2 hubbed sets, 1 straight
Pole Material Aluminum 14 mm aluminum 7000-series aluminum Aluminum 6061/7001 aluminum
Extras Vented fly and color-coded poles Internal dry lines, hang loops, Velcro lantern loop Porch Light 4-Season 22 Pockets!


Best Overall Camping Tent


Marmot Halo 6


88
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Space and Comfort 9
  • Weather Resistance 9
  • Ease of Use 8
  • Durability 9
  • Family Friendliness 8
Inside Height: 6'4" | Floor Dimensions: 9'10" x 9'10" (96.7 sq ft)
Very simple to pitch and tear down
Great use of space
Perfect sized front and rear vestibules
Easy to put the fly on backward
Great stakes, but not for super hard ground
Heavy and expensive

Pound for pound, the Marmot Halo 6 is the best camping tent we tested. Looks, check. Durability, check. Space, check. We tossed weather, dogs, kids, and a marriage at this tent, and it asked for more. And thanks to the halo design feature, you may just have the biggest tent at camp without looking like you do. The Halo 6 will easily fit two twins and a full blow-up air mattress with room for bags, dogs, and more. And thanks to the beefy poles that easily slide through the dome-style slots and some color-coated assembly help, you and your partner will feel like a team putting this thing up.

About the only real complaint we have about this tent is its price. That and maybe a little knock for including backpack-style stakes with a 21-pound tent that clearly won't be hauled up a trail. You can also expect to put the fly on backward at least once (yes, there is a front and a back on this tent even though it looks perfectly symmetrical) and some pockets on the ceiling that act more like shelves than anything else. But if you are looking for a rock-solid tent with nearly 100 sq ft of floor space and a 32 sq ft vestibule fit for proper cooking protected from the elements, the Halo 6 is hard to beat.

Read the full review: Marmot Halo 6

Best Bang for Your Buck


Kelty Wireless 6


73
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Space and Comfort 7
  • Weather Resistance 7
  • Ease of Use 8
  • Durability 7
  • Family Friendliness 8
Inside Height: 6'4" | Floor Dimensions: 9'10" x 8'10" (86.9 sq ft)
Spacious
Dual vestibules
Great value
Fiberglass poles
Poor ventilation

The Kelty Wireless 6 takes your budget further than any other camping tent in our lineup. With a large sleeping area, dual vestibules, and 6'4" of headroom, your entire family will have plenty of space to sprawl out. Setup is also quick and easy with well-designed pole pockets and quick twist connectors. Dark fabric covers just over half of the tent, with tight, easy-to-see-through mesh covering the rest. This provides both privacy and amazing star gazing capabilities.

Being a budget tent, there are some downsides. Most notability, less durable fiberglass poles, and poor ventilation with the rainfly attached. The side pockets are also fairly cheap fabric, and clipping the topmost clip during setup requires someone 5'10" or taller. But overall, the Wireless 6 is a solid choice for those looking for a quality three-season tent at a budget price.

Read the full review: Kelty Wireless 6

Best for Usable Space


The North Face Wawona 6


85
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Space and Comfort 9
  • Weather Resistance 8
  • Ease of Use 7
  • Durability 9
  • Family Friendliness 9
Inside Height: 6'6" | Floor Dimensions: 10' x 8'6" (85 sq ft)
Huge front vestibule
Great in the wind and rain
Amazing value
Updated detached fly makes pitching unintuitive
Back window pockets obstruct views
Only one door

Are you a camper with a hobby? Then this is your tent. The North Face Wawona 6, a long-standing favorite in this review, is the perfect basecamp for mountain bikers, rock climbers, fishermen, hunters, or anyone packing lots of gear that needs to be protected. Why? The vestibule is like a two-bike garage. The main tent packs an additional 85 sq ft, creating a truly fantastic living space. The Wawona literally has you covered and all for a very fair price.

All this space does come at a cost. Setting up the rain fly and garage in moderate wind isn't as intuitive as it could be. The North Face went with a pin and circle locking mechanism that requires some effort to lock, and because of the height and length of this tent, the guylines are a requirement unless you enjoy watching your tent sail away into the sunset. That said, once this tent is set up, it is massive, comfortable, and withstood some howling winds and rainy nights in Joshua Tree with ease.

Read the full review: The North Face Wawona 6

Best for Weather Resistance


REI Co-op Base Camp 6


83
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Space and Comfort 8
  • Weather Resistance 9
  • Ease of Use 8
  • Durability 8
  • Family Friendliness 8
Inside Height: 6'2" | Floor Dimensions: 9'2" x 9'2" (84 sq ft)
Built for stormy weather
Huge doors and large vestibule
14 pockets
Not as ideal in warm weather
Less mesh for sky-gazing

The REI Base Camp 6 is a great choice for those looking to dip their toes into colder, windier, and rainier adventures. With a study 4 pole structure and thick, strong materials, this tent is ready to take on the harsh world of both teenagers and bad weather camping. And thanks to a 27 sq ft front vestibule, you'll have options to cook and store your gear safely out of the elements. You can always count on REI tents to have boatloads of pockets, great headroom, and a clean aesthetic style — the Base Camp boasts all of that and more.

Unlike most REI tents, though, the Base Camp 6 sides and doors are not open mesh. This means no nice views while lying down, and you can expect to be fairly toasty on warm days if you're hanging out inside. There are, however, some half zip coverings on the doors to give you a little extra view. All in all, this is a great option for those needing a well-priced weather-ready shelter. Snag this tent for your next stay in the rainy Pacific Northwest or thunderstorm-prone Rocky Mountains.

Read the full review: REI Co-op Base Camp 6

Best 4-Person Tent


MSR Habitude 4


83
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Space and Comfort 8
  • Weather Resistance 9
  • Ease of Use 8
  • Durability 9
  • Family Friendliness 7
Inside Height: 6'1" | Floor Dimensions: 7'11" x 7'11" (62.4 sq ft)
Built tough
Tall interior
Perfect size vestibule
Only one door
Harder to pitch

Looking for a spacious and high-quality camping tent but don’t want a massive six-person setup? The MSR Habitude 4 is a great choice. This stylish tent is not only light (12 pounds) and compact, but also built with top-of-the-line materials and is both tall (6'1" in the middle) and spacious (62.4 sq ft footprint). It also features unique touches like a porch light, a large 23.5 sq ft vestibule, and great ventilation.

Although there are many positives to the Habitude 4, it isn’t perfect. Some flaws include a single door that requires two zippers to open, a light that doesn’t come with a battery, and an awkward bag. Those minor things aside, this tent outscored all other four-person tents in our lineup.

Read the full review: MSR Habitude 4

Compare Products

select up to 5 products to compare
Score Product Price Our Take
88
$643
Editors' Choice Award
A great pick for those looking to balance size and quality with ease of use
85
$450
Top Pick Award
It's hard to imagine a better use of space at this price point
83
$500
Top Pick Award
A unique tent both in looks and features, built with quality material from a well-known brand
83
$469
Top Pick Award
A great choice for those looking to camp in less pristine weather
79
$499
Feel like royalty in this kingdom that offers space galore
76
$370
For a simple, high-quality tent, this classic criss-cross design is recognizably comfortable
74
$500
While this tent might not shine in every category, it has some features that might just be perfect for you
73
$270
Best Buy Award
A spacious, high-quality, six-person budget tent ready for large family adventures
72
$650
Though this tent may struggle in the wind, it will fit a family of four in style and be the talk of the campground
71
$299
When you pair all the essentials at a great price point, you get a grand buy
59
$160
An instant answer to easy, breezy camping at a very affordable price
51
$70
A great way to get into camping with a decent tent and little expense
50
$200
If you are looking for a budget 6-person tent and don't mind poor quality and staying out of the rain, this might work

Camping tents lined up and ready for scrutiny.
Camping tents lined up and ready for scrutiny.
Photo: Rob Gaedtke

Why You Should Trust Us


Basecamp. It's the center of any outdoor adventure, and having the right shelter is the most important ingredient for making great outdoor fun (besides beer, marshmallows, and good people). Our tester Rob Gaedtke put these tents to the test so that you can choose your next home-away-from-home with confidence. Rob is no stranger to the outdoors or adventure. He has raced across India, done an IronMan in Mexico, Jeeped through the African safari, and backflipped off the pyramids. He is also a rock climber, backpacker, and avid camper. Over the past 20 years, Rob has set up hundreds of basecamps across a variety of terrain. We took this experience, coupled with a rigorous and detailed testing plan, and got to work finding a diverse set of tents for consideration.

First, we scoured the internet, read personal accounts, and dug into bloggers' and YouTubers' thoughts on the best tents on the market. After selecting the most promising options, we purchased all the tents and got to work. We measured, weighed, and inspected each one before carting them out to the woods and desert for proper testing. We used five primary metrics for assessing our tents: space and comfort, weather resistance, ease of use, durability, and family friendliness. We tested them side-by-side in various locations in the Tahoe, CA area, in the hot and harsh conditions of Joshua Tree National Park, and in the ripping wind of Reno, NV. Read on to learn how each model measured up in each of our metrics and why.

Related: How We Tested Camping Tents

Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge

Analysis and Test Results


We put these camping tents up against the elements, battling kids, wind, dogs, dirt, heat, and a very opinionated husband and wife team. From setup and breakdown to weather resistance and durability to the quality of the space for both hanging out and sleeping, we put these products through a lot to help you find your best match. Read on to see which tents scored the highest in each category and why.

Related: Buying Advice for Camping Tents

Value


Value here is all about getting the most tent for the least amount of cash — or at least a fair amount of cash. We like to see a solid balance of performance and price. As a general rule, when the price goes up in the tent world, so does the performance, though there are some notable exceptions.


The clear winners for value go to the Marmot Limestone 4, the Kelty Wireless 6, and the REI Grand Hut 4. All three of these tents performed well yet still fall on the lower end of the price spectrum, with the real stand-out being the Wireless. We rarely find a quality 6-person tent at a price point that low.

Great design, quality materials, and a low price point, value is...
Great design, quality materials, and a low price point, value is this tent's middle name
Photo: Rob Gaedtke

Once you step down into the lower price ranges, things do start to get a little more complicated. That said, we would be remiss if we didn't give a huge value nod to the Coleman 4-Person Cabin with Instant Setup. This little tent is cheap, sturdy, and a great option to put up with only a moment's notice.

Value is important, and the Wawona 6 has lots of it.
Value is important, and the Wawona 6 has lots of it.
Photo: Rob Gaedtke

Space and Comfort


This is arguably the most important category when it comes to car camping. If you are only hauling your tent a few yards from your trunk, then trading a little extra weight and size for better comfort and space is an easy choice. For this metric, we looked at the overall footprint of each tent, including the vestibule space. We checked the height and headroom, doors and windows, and the general airflow with and without the rainfly. And finally, we looked at pockets, clips, and storage options.


The Wawona, Halo, and Kingdom take top marks here. Let's dive into the Wawona first. When you combine the spacious and tall interior (6' 6" max height and 85 sq ft of floor) with the large double-doored vestibule (and additional 44.7 sq ft), you have a comfort masterpiece. The new design allows the tent to be used without the vestibule, adding a great option for warm-weather camping. We also love the tall, full-sized door feature that allows you to enter without ducking.

Cooking up dinner in the Wawona&#039;s covered and spacious vestibule.
Cooking up dinner in the Wawona's covered and spacious vestibule.
Photo: Rob Gaedtke

The REI Kingdom 6 has a unique, longer footprint that makes fitting a family of four with one full and two twin blow-up mattresses pretty easy. The pole structure allows for near-vertical walls with a peak height of 6' 3". The Kingdom also has some exceptional pocket action. We counted 22 in this tent, many big enough to fit a small child in. Add in the removable room divider, and you have some pretty awesome comforts. Our only wish is that the vestibule was as cool as the tent. At only 29 sq ft, you won't be doing much in here other than keeping your shoes and a few bags out of the elements.

The headroom and pockets on the Kingdom 6 are impressive.
The headroom and pockets on the Kingdom 6 are impressive.
Photo: Rob Gaedtke

The Halo 6 has the second largest floor footprint in our camping tent lineup, a max height of 6' 4", and with a vestibule that easily fits two chairs, it's a delight to use. It also packs in 14 pockets and enough room to fit three air mattresses (one full and two twins) AND a dog bed comfortably.

Just the right amount of room to eat, sleep and laugh without ever...
Just the right amount of room to eat, sleep and laugh without ever leaving the Halo 6.
Photo: Rob Gaedtke

There are a few other tents that scored respectability in this category. The NEMO Wagontop 6 is the biggest, tallest tent in our lineup with a more than 125 sq ft floor plan and a max height of 6' 8". It also has a suitable vestibule and a two-room interior fit for royalty. The Big Agnes Tensleep Station 6 comes with an incredibly versatile vestibule that allows for multiple configurations based on the weather. That, paired with its 80 sq ft interior and massive pocket options, earned it a respectful place in this metric. And finally, the Base Camp 6 is notable for its roomy vestibule (though not quite as versatile) and large, well-designed interior space. All three of these tents make great use of space while providing outstanding comfort.

The kids separated by the fixed, full-length room divider of the...
The kids separated by the fixed, full-length room divider of the NEMO Wagontop. The dogs clearly don't want the added privacy.
Photo: Rob Gaedtke

It isn’t often we see a 4-person tent score so high in this category, but the MSR Habitude 4 had just enough space, features, and comforts to rise to the top. With 62.4 sq ft of floor space, a perfectly sized vestibule, and seven pockets, this tent is worth a look for those not interested in the 6-person setups.

The Habitude 4 provided the best layout of all the 4-person models...
The Habitude 4 provided the best layout of all the 4-person models we tested.
Photo: Rob Gaedtke


Floor Plans
Be sure to review the floor plan images for a tent before committing. If you are like us, you have air mattresses and chairs that you would like to use inside, so the floor plan can help you map it out. And remember, most of these tents say they sleep six, but that is six elbow to elbow.

Weather Resistance


Getting wet, poles breaking in the wind, and roasting in the hot sun. These are all deal-breakers when it comes to camping — especially if you have children with you. So for the weather resistance category, we considered all of the following: hot day options, cold day options, rainfly coverage, aerodynamic-ness, stakes, poles, and guylines. We tested these in a mix of real-world situations and fabricated ones thanks to a sprinkler rig and backpack blower. The bottom line, we got these tents hot, cold, wet, and winded. Here is how they stood up.


We put the Marmot Limestone 4 up against the wicked hot days of the southern California desert and the windy nights of Reno, NV. Its shape held up perfectly to both, and the full-covered rainfly kept everything dry. Two extra poles on the tent's roof add just enough extra height to feel open without turning it into a flat walled sail.

Privacy meets open-air with the Limestone 4.
Privacy meets open-air with the Limestone 4.
Photo: Rob Gaedtke

The REI Base Camp 6 is the only tent in our lineup rated for 4-seasons, so, as you might imagine, this tent packs that extra girth needed for winter camping. The classic dome shape, paired with two extra poles for strength, instills confidence that, should the worst come, you are in good hands. But this tent isn't just good in cold weather — ditching the rain fly exposes adequate star gazing, and the door covers can be zipped down halfway for more airflow. That said, we wouldn't plan on taking this tent anywhere too hot.

The Base Camp 6 is a stout-looking tent that will stand firm through...
The Base Camp 6 is a stout-looking tent that will stand firm through inclement weather.
Photo: Rob Gaedtke

The Marmot Halo 6 is another classic dome shape that stays securely on the ground in the wind. The Halo comes with DAC DA17 poles, meaning they are of superb quality. It also comes with unique sliding guylines that give two points of contact on the vestibule but only one point of contact on the ground. Both are connected via a metal ring that keeps the guyline tight yet still allows movement. These features combine to make for one tank of a tent. The Halo also does a little better job than the Base Camp in warm weather as it is better equipped (aka, has a heck of a lot more mesh) for chilling out when you ditch the rain fly.

The naked look of the Halo 6 ready for summer fun.
The naked look of the Halo 6 ready for summer fun.
Photo: Rob Gaedtke

Breaking the dome shape mold but still scoring top points is the MSR Habitude 4. This tent is very capable in both hot and cold weather. And while a touch on the broad side, the included guy lines and slanted vestibule face make this tent very wind worthy when faced into the wine.

The stance of the Habitude 4 is as robust as the quality materials...
The stance of the Habitude 4 is as robust as the quality materials inside
Photo: Rob Gaedtke

Two other tents that scored among the best in the weather resistance category are the Wawona and the Tensleep Station. Both are powerful weather contenders. The Wawona lost a few points for the new rainfly that only covers the side mesh a little bit, allowing for moisture to sneak through in windy situations, but it remains a burly tent in every other way. The Tensleep Station is also excellent, but the stakes are thin, and the top ventilation could be improved.

Stake It Out
Wind resistance often comes down to how well you stake down a tent and use the guylines to keep it taught. Unless you're assured of a balmy, windless night, staking out the guylines as you set up is a good habit to get into as it will keep you from scrambling around (and likely getting soaked) if bad weather hits. For most tents, we highly recommend buying extra cord, burlier stakes, and a mallet.

Ease of Use


Setting up and tearing down camp can make or break your trip. We have all been there, rolling into camp at 11 pm, tired and ready to relax — the last thing you want is a fight with your tent or your partner about the tent. We took one for the team here and got the frustration out so you can be prepared. We also took note of whether each tent easily fit back into its bag, the total packed size, and the packed weight.


Before digging in further, we should point out that any tent you pitch enough times will get easier. However, we made it a point to judge the first pitch, as many folks only use their tent once or twice a year, and who knows what you will and won't remember after most of a year has passed. Especially if you happened to throw out the directions…

The Coleman Cabin with Instant Setup scored among the highest here. This thing went up in under 60-seconds and came down nearly as fast. But ease of use isn't just about setup and tear down — we took one point away here due to its weight being on the heavy side for a small four-person tent and the struggle required to fit the tent back in the bag. We also hope the mechanisms that make this tent so quick to set up stay as smooth and easy to use over time. If you're looking for a tent you can toss up after a few beers or in the dark, check this one out.

Relaxing after pitching the Coleman Cabin in 43-seconds. Plenty of...
Relaxing after pitching the Coleman Cabin in 43-seconds. Plenty of time left to look off at the other campers still unpacking their tent.
Photo: Rob Gaedtke

Though nothing will compare to the setup time of an instant tent, the Grand Hut 4 went up — staked, rainfly on, and fully guylined out — in under 4 minutes. This tent is about as simple as it gets and light to boot at only 13.7 lbs. REI was also kind enough to color code the clips and pole, taking 100% of the guesswork out of pitching.

Other tents worth mentioning here are the Base Camp 6 (impressive setup and tear down speed for a 6-person tent), the Limestone 4 (simple and super light at only 11.3 lbs), the Coleman Sundome Dome 4 (9.8 lbs and not much to mess up), and the Halo 6 (a 6:04 pitch time for a 6-person tent).

Additionally, the Halo 6 and the Base Camp 6 are two of the most intuitive tents we have ever put up. Both share very similar experiences with poles that snap together almost on their own and glide through the fabric supports with ease. The Halo was pitched in just over 6 minutes and the Base Camp in just over 7. These are great times for 6-person tents with vestibules you can sit in.

Setting up the Halo 6 with the color-coded snaps. Easy breezy.
Setting up the Halo 6 with the color-coded snaps. Easy breezy.
Photo: Rob Gaedtke

We would be remiss if we didn’t share two features of the Kelty Wireless 6 that speak directly to ease of use. Kelty added what they call Quick Corners to aid in solo setup. These are essentially pockets on all four corners that make the poles stand erect without needing to hold them. They also have a single side color-coded. While this seems strange, having only one color to look for versus two is a fantastic simplification that we hope other brands copy.

The Kelty Quick Corners make pitching this tent a breeze, even when...
The Kelty Quick Corners make pitching this tent a breeze, even when solo.
Photo: Rob Gaedtke

Don't Forget the Footprint
Make sure to seriously consider buying a ground cover — a.k.a. "footprint" — for your tent and laying this out first. It not only helps keep moisture and mud off the underside of your tent (thus making re-packing a much more pleasant task), it also helps your tent last longer because it protects it from abrasion. Most manufacturers sell a footprint separately (usually made of the same material as the tent) designed to fit the exact floor size of whichever model tent you have. Despite the extra cost, it's a great thing to take along. The savvy camper's alternative is a cheap plastic tarp, like something you'd throw down to paint your living room. You can often pick one of these up for a fraction of the cost of an official manufacturer's footprint, though it won't have features like rivets to accommodate your stakes.

Durability


Honesty and transparency are important here at GearLab, and that is why this category is weighted at only 15%. We can't spend months or years testing each tent (though we do use them hard), so judging their true durability over time isn't what this is all about. Here, we are looking at the materials used, the general feel of the poles and stakes, and details like how the stitching and seams are constructed. We also tap into our experience and knowledge to judge overall quality. But let's face it, when it comes to buying long-lasting gear these days, the age-old saying does tend to hold true: you get what you pay for.


Several of our tents scored well in this category. From the moment you roll the Halo 6 out, it screams quality, and it dang well better for the price you pay. It sports the thickest poles in our lineup, the smoothest and silkiest mesh surrounded by 68D polyester ripstop, and is covered with a bomber rain fly. The stakes are the weakest link here — they are still extremely nice, just better suited for a backpacking tent, not your massive car camp tent.

The Marmot Halo 6 sports quality poles, strong fabric, and...
The Marmot Halo 6 sports quality poles, strong fabric, and tight-knit mesh. All critical factors in the longevity of your tent.
Photo: Rob Gaedtke

Just a touch below the Halo is the Base Camp 6, Wawona 6, Habitude 4, and the Limestone 4. The Limestone shares many of the same durability characteristics as its bigger brother, the Halo, with slightly skinnier but still very wind-worthy poles, the same great fabric, and the same catch-free zippers.

The Limestone 4 after a rough and windy night. Everything held and...
The Limestone 4 after a rough and windy night. Everything held and no water made it through to the inside.
Photo: Rob Gaedtke

The Base Camp 6 is a step above in quality over your typical REI tent. It has a 150-denier polyester floor that is both abrasion and puncture-resistant. Thick aluminum poles, fabric, seams, and zippers all look and feel top-notch. The Wawona 6 is made by The North Face, a well-known brand for quality, and this tent is no different. The main tent is made out of 150D polyester taffeta, the floor out of 68D polyester, and the poles are DAC MX — strong and light. And, of course, all seams are seam-sealed with a tub-style floor.

The snaps on the Base Camp are extremely well engineered and very...
The snaps on the Base Camp are extremely well engineered and very easy to clip.
Photo: Rob Gaedtke

Next is the MSR Habitude 4. This tent checks every box when it comes to quality materials. From the 7000-series aluminum poles to the DWR 68D polyester taffeta on the floor — everything down to the guyline tighteners is top-notch. The only complaint you will have in the quality department is the included porch light and bag, which are minor issues.

Quality materials can be found throughout, from the floors to the...
Quality materials can be found throughout, from the floors to the poles, this tent is built to last
Photo: Rob Gaedtke

Of note: if you are looking to set up anything with feet in your tent and don't want to puncture the base, the Wagontop 6 has a 300D polyester floor and the Limestone 4, the Grand Hut 4 and the Coleman Instant all sport 150D polyester material floors.

If you are looking for a budget camping tent, the single best upgrade to your durability is swapping out the fiberglass poles and getting a set of aluminum ones. Poles and mesh are where the budget tents fail. In the budget tents we reviewed — with the exception of the impressive Kelty Wireless 6 — the mesh areas are at least twice as large as the other tents and feel significantly cheaper in quality. Get better poles and be cautious around your mesh, and a budget tent can last you years.

The string connecting the poles together snapped on our first setup...
The string connecting the poles together snapped on our first setup of the Coleman Sundome 4.
Photo: Rob Gaedtke

Consider the Long-Term Investment
Unless you're only planning on going camping once or twice a year on an idyllic beach, it's worth taking the long view when it comes to the quality — and often thus the price — of your tent. We are fans of quality gear that performs well season after season.

Family Friendliness


The final category we considered was family friendliness. This doesn't just mean actual family — it means how useful is the tent if you want to camp with more than just yourself? Can you bring two dogs and a friend or three and still be comfortable? We looked at how comfortably each tent could fit at least four people, whether it has phone/jewelry storage options, if it provides a space to clean your feet before entering, if it has multiple room options for privacy, and if it is dog/animal friendly. Among other things. Though some of these aspects do fall under other categories, we felt it was important to our readers to look at them again but with this viewpoint in mind.


This is where the NEMO Wagontop 6 shines. This thing is the largest 6-person tent we reviewed and boasts a mudroom, a small room, and a living room. Oh yeah, and it has a good-sized vestibule too! The Wagontop is also the tallest tent, at a whopping 6' 8" of headroom. This tent fits two full mattresses with some room to spare, along with plenty of dog bed space. About the only thing not ideal about the Wagontop in the family-friendly category is the storm factor. This is a fair-weather tent and didn't hold up well in our wind and rain tests thanks to windows that don't zip and a 7-foot vertical wall (a.k.a sail). That aside, if you are a beach camper looking for some room to sprawl out, you found your soulmate here.

The massive four-section interior of the Wagontop 6.
The massive four-section interior of the Wagontop 6.
Photo: Rob Gaedtke

For those looking for a different multi-room option, the REI Kingdom 6 is another good choice. Because of its longer and skinnier profile, sleeping four people is a breeze. We were able to fit two twin mattresses on one side and a full-size one on the other with some room to spare between the twin beds. You can also tack on some points for a sweet backpack-style carrying case and 22 pockets. The only bummer is the lack of space in the newly downsized vestibule.

The removable divider setup on the Kingdom 6 keeps the kids and dogs...
The removable divider setup on the Kingdom 6 keeps the kids and dogs on one side and the parents on the other.
Photo: Rob Gaedtke

The Wawona 6 checks most of the family-friendly boxes, easily sleeping a family of four with great height, storage, and covered outside space. Because of the large, tall vestibule, we were able to set up a camp shower for a quick rinse after a sweaty day of climbing. Just remember not to ask your kids to take the fly off, as the locking mechanism requires some serious force to get out.

Another notable performance for the family-friendly category is the Big Agnes Tensleep Station 6. This tent sports a large 2-chair front vestibule, great pocket/storage options, and two bonus super-sized pockets. The setup time was very smooth at just over 7 min; however, the bag that this tent comes in isn't friendly to pack, so what you gain in setup time is easily lost in the teardown.

Nighty night, Tensleep Station, you faired quite well today.
Nighty night, Tensleep Station, you faired quite well today.
Photo: Rob Gaedtke

And finally, the Kelty Wireless 6. Two adults, two kids, and two dogs fit comfortably inside this tent, and the dual vestibules allow for even more storage and organization. Add in the ease of setup, a nice carry bag, and wonderful star-gazing capabilities, and you have a solid tent. Finally, once you realize the bargain price of the Wireless 6, it's hard to pass it up.

Conclusion


When it comes to camping, a tent is the most important item you will buy, so picking the right one is key to a successful adventure. Think about the type of camping you intend to do and what you find most important in a shelter. Innovations are happening all the time, so if there's a feature you want, you'll likely be able to find it. Now, go get yourself a tent and get outside!

Panoramic views from the NEMO Wagontop 6 make for very happy campers.
Panoramic views from the NEMO Wagontop 6 make for very happy campers.
Photo: Rob Gaedtke

Rob Gaedtke