The 12 Best Softshell Jackets for Men

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Softshell jackets have become one of the most popular garments in many outdoor enthusiasts' wardrobes, and it can be tough to decide which one is the best since there are so many on the market. We chose 12 of the top performing softshell jackets to test in our review from the many available and took them on rigorous outdoor adventures for real-world testing to see how they compared with one another. Our testers hiked, biked, climbed and skied in these jackets for months to research their merits and their shortcomings so that you can pick the right one for your needs. We are confident that our comprehensive review determines which of the 11 rose to the top and which did not.

Read the full review below >

Test Results and Ratings

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Analysis and Award Winners


Review by:
Ryan Huetter
Review Editor
OutdoorGearLab

Last Updated:
Friday
March 23, 2018

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Updated March 2018
Softshell jackets are now one of the most popular layers in the closet of an outdoor recreationist. They provide a blend of weather protection and breathability that hardshell jackets do not, but there are so many on the market now that it can be tough to figure out which one is best. For this updated review we added models from Arcteryx and Rab, which took home top awards for their alpine climbing prowess, as well as from Outdoor Research which garnered high scores for price and performance.

Best Overall


Arc'teryx Psiphon FL Hoody


Editors' Choice Award


Mobile, stretchy fabric
Excellent all-weather shield
Quality, detailed construction
Pricier than others
Minimalist features
The Editors Choice Award was given to the Arcteryx Psiphon FL, a durable and stretchy layer that our testers fell in love with. Part of the Arcteryx "Fast and Light" series, this jacket is a lightweight 4 season softshell that provides weather protection and a trimmed down set of features that will appeal to alpine climbers or those who seek out a highly breathable, well-tailored coat for active use.

Read review: Arcteryx Psiphon FL

Best Bang for the Buck


Outdoor Research Ferrosi


Best Buy Award

$49.47
at Backcountry
See It

Breathes very well
Low weight
Does not restrict movement
Hand pockets not accessible when wearing a harness
Below-average wet weather protection
The Outdoor Research Ferrosi Jacket is a hoodless softshell jacket that allows the user to move unrestricted during athletic movement. While the Hooded Ferrosi jacket has been a previous award winner, we chose the Ferrosi jacket as is bridged the gap between windshirt and softshell, creating a perfect blend of weather resistance and mobility. This was our lead reviewer's most worn jacket when mountain biking, XC skiing, and trail running. The light fabric keeps the wind and light drizzle at bay, and the thumb loops keep the cuffs from exposing the arms. At $99, this is not only one of the least expensive jackets we tested, but it is also a top performer.

Read review: Outdoor Research Ferrosi

Top Pick Award for Climbing


Rab Torque


Top Pick Award

$199.95
at MooseJaw
See It

Combines exceptional breathability with water resistance
Abrasion resistant patches
Harness-friendly Napolean pocket layout
Helmet-compatible hood
Average weight
Specialized for alpine use
The Rab Torque is a trim-fitting softshell jacket that is ready to tackle rock or alpine routes where getting scrappy is part of the program. With durable Matrix SWS fabric on the shoulders and elbows, areas that climbers tend to find themselves scraping against the rock, the Torque has longevity in harsh environments. The rest of the body is made up of Matrix DWS, a more stretchy fabric that is tailored well and provides an excellent athletic fit. For being so light, this jacket also has features that make it stand out from the rest, such as a 2-way zipper and a well-designed hood with a brim.

Read review: Rab Torque

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Score Product Price Our Take
89
$239
Editors' Choice Award
Whatever the season, the Psiphon FL is a useful, versatile softshell jacket that is incredibly light while still protecting you from the elements.
77
$200
Top Pick Award
With a trim fit and intentional features with climbers, mountaineers and skiers in mind, the Torque jacket was our Top Pick for Climbing.
75
$250
One of the most comfortable jackets in our review with a soft fleece interior, this is a great piece for layering or wearing alone on chilly days.
74
$99
Best Buy Award
While not the most weather proof jacket, the Ferrosi is a wind resistant softshell that allows for ultimate mobility for climbers and adventurers on a budget.
72
$225
Heavy and fleece backed, the Dragon is a great option for those needing extra weather protection and mobility on their cold weather adventures.
71
$190
A do-it-all softshell jacket, the ROM is a great choice for those seeking a simple jacket that does well in a range of conditions.
71
$299
With stylish looks and adventure inspired features, the Gamma MX is a decent option for those not needing a hood.
69
$230
The Kinetic Plus is a durable softshell hybrid that is perfect for high output alpine activities.
68
$199
With a good combination of weather protection and breathability, this is a great all-mountain option.
59
$199
With proven softshell fabrics and a stylish look, the Adze Hoody is a decent jacket for cold and windy days around town.
57
$115
This affordable, comfortable layer offers durability, warmth and wind resistance and offers clean, casual styling.
51
$149
A relaxed fit jacket that provides ample weather protection for casual trips, the Apex Bionic 2 is for non-technical outings.

Analysis and Test Results


For two months, our expert testers wore these jackets across a range of outdoor recreation. We trekked and climbed, hiked and biked, ran and skied in the mountains that we live and work on. We defined how and why these jackets performed the way they did and experienced their shortcomings. We also used standardized tests such as the water submersion and cuff slip test to see how they compared side-by-side. Above you can see how each model stacked up overall, and you can continue reading on below to learn what metrics we used and how each one is defined.

Our lead tester while out on a fast-paced jaunt  testing breathability.
Our lead tester while out on a fast-paced jaunt, testing breathability.

Weather Protection


In this metric, we evaluate how well these jackets keep you comfortable in windy and wet conditions. During our testing period, we used these softshells on windy alpine ridges, stuck our arms out the window while going 60mpg, and endured soaking waterfalls to test the water resistance of the jackets. Some of our test jackets, such as the Outdoor Research Ascendant Hoody are lightly insulated, though we did not factor warmth into our scoring since most softshell jackets are meant to be worn on top of base layers in colder climates.


Although we tested these jackets to the limit of water resistance, these jackets are by no means waterproof and are not suited for conditions that demand that attribute. If liquid water is falling on you, it's a matter of time before these jackets go from being comfy and cozy to being heavy, waterlogged messes that are neither warm nor comfortable. The weather resistance of the softshells we tested varies…some models are almost fully waterproof while others are barely wind resistant.

The Terretex and Fortius fabrics do a great job of repelling water and snow  without soaking the fabric at all.
The Terretex and Fortius fabrics do a great job of repelling water and snow, without soaking the fabric at all.

Over the years, we've tested weather resistance in a myriad of conditions, from mountaineering in Alaska to ice and alpine climbing in Maine and New Hampshire. In our most recent update, we wore our test jackets in the high alpine, late-season conditions, climbing rock and ice routes in the High Sierra, and skiing during the sold beginnings of winter.

For those seeking a jacket for above-treeline adventures, we strongly recommend a hood. While some of the jackets we reviewed are excellent choices for aerobic activities during fair weather where a hood might be cumbersome or unneeded, these hoodless models did not inspire confidence in inclement conditions. Luckily, several of our reviewed jackets, such as the Arc'teryx Gamma MX are available with hoods as well.

Heavier duty jackets like the Dragon are better for days with wetter conditions.
Heavier duty jackets like the Dragon are better for days with wetter conditions.

While some hybrid softshells employ taped seams and waterproof membranes, these jackets tend to be very specialized and expensive. In this year's review we mostly feature jackets which use typical, DWR treated stretch softshell materials, with the exception of the Rab Kinetic Plus which does use a hybrid material and taped seams. Some jackets, like the Mountain Hardwear Dragon, excelled at keeping even heavy precipitation at bay, while the Adze fell behind as water leaked through the untaped seams. Keep in mind, however, that neither of these jackets breathes very well. On the other end of the spectrum, the Outdoor Research Ascendent and the Outdoor Research Ferrosi Jacket defended against the torrent poorly; however, both of these jackets are very breathable, and therefore allowed us to dry out quickly. These pieces are best for winter running, cross-country skiing, and spring/summer alpine, rock climbing.

When the storm clouds start building  you want to make sure that your softshell can handle light snow and rain.
When the storm clouds start building, you want to make sure that your softshell can handle light snow and rain.

Breathability


Breathability is the calling card of a softshell jacket and one of the most important benefits of a softshell jacket. In fact, we think that that breathability is the main reason to choose this type of layer over a waterproof jacket. The term breathability describes the ability of a material to transport moisture. Even if a waterproof jacket helps you stay dry from the rain, during high activity our bodies can perspire two liters per hour! If you sweat that much while wearing a hardshell rain jacket, you probably feel wet and clammy. If you sweat that much in a lightweight softshell, you feel much drier and much happier. When being active in marginal conditions, you often need to choose whether you want to be wet on the inside or wet on the outside.



Staying dry is also one of the biggest keys to staying comfortable and warm in cold climates since water transmits heat much faster than air. This fact is of critical importance in cold climates. You might be surprised that most cases of hypothermia occur in temperatures above freezing. When temperatures are lower, water freezes and it becomes harder for us to get wet and subsequently chilled. One great way to get chilled in the snow, however, is to get soaked in sweat by wearing too many clothes or clothes that aren't breathable enough. Once your cardio output declines, you will chill rapidly.

Light enough to breathe well but with moderate wind protection  we liked the Ferrosi for cool fall morning rides
Light enough to breathe well but with moderate wind protection, we liked the Ferrosi for cool fall morning rides

As you increase your output (i.e., your level of aerobic activity), having an outer layer that can breathe well becomes more and more necessary. For example, cross-country skiing and backcountry ski touring demand highly breathable jackets, but activities like moderate hiking and downhill skiing do not. Breathability is primarily determined by the presence or absence of a laminated membrane and/or a fleece liner, both of which decrease breathability compared to jackets that don't have layers or liners. Additionally, the thickness and weave of the fabric influence breathability; thin loose knit fabrics are the most breathable and thicker fleece insulated jackets are less breathable.

During aerobic activity  our softshell layer needs to be able to adequately breathe. Shown here is the lead tester making the rounds through the models.
During aerobic activity, our softshell layer needs to be able to adequately breathe. Shown here is the lead tester making the rounds through the models.

After every outing, we gathered breathability feedback from each tester. These scores are subjective and reflect our testers' personal opinions about the level of breathability of each jacket. The Outdoor Research Ferrosi Jacket received a score of 10 and is the most breathable jacket that we tested. It also, however, earned a weather resistance rating of 3. The Rab Torque received a score of 9 but did much better at providing some protection from the wind and falling snow. The Mountain Hardwear Dragon and Patagonia Adze were much less breathable, but in turn, offer more weather protection.

Wearing light layers lets this jacket breathe well while climbing quickly on alpine routes.
Wearing light layers lets this jacket breathe well while climbing quickly on alpine routes.

The right shell for you largely depends on the amount of sweat you generate while playing in the mountains. Our bodies vary, which means that some of us need more breathable jackets than others. If you sweat a lot or frequently engage in highly aerobic activities, you'll love the excellent breathability of a jacket like the OR Ferrosi or Rab Torque. If you're not planning to wear your shell during high output activities, then consider a more weather resistant shell like The North Face Apex Bionic 2 Jacket.

Day hikes like this one can handle a heavier weave with less breathability.
Day hikes like this one can handle a heavier weave with less breathability.

Mobility & Fit


If you enjoy the restrictive feeling of wearing formal clothing, disregard our comments on mobility. But if you're like most people, then mobility is a key factor to consider when buying technical clothing. Most outdoor apparel is moderately mobile and is comfortable if you're walking around. However, many outdoor sports involve things like stretching your arms above your head to reach an out-of-reach climbing hold, twisting your hips into a joyous powder turn, or looking up with a hood on to see a magnificent mountain peak. Because we are searching for the highest performing gear for outdoor activities, we rank mobility as a high priority for our needs.


Our mobility metric assesses each product's overall comfort during aerobic activities. We took into consideration whether it rode up when lifting our arms if the shoulders allow for full rotation and whether we could layer underneath it without feeling restricted. During our testing, we not only studied the design of each product's arms and shoulders but also how they performed during all our day-to-day outdoor activities.

Jackets designed for technical pursuits should stretch with the wearer. The Dragon  pictured here  scored a 7 out of 10.
Jackets designed for technical pursuits should stretch with the wearer. The Dragon, pictured here, scored a 7 out of 10.

Some jackets were mobile enough in the body for activities like skiing, but when we took them ice climbing, the jackets either pulled out of our harnesses when reaching up, or our cuff fell below our gloves exposing our wrists to the cold and snow. Longer wrists and underarm gussets are both designed to help counter this problem.

The articulated elbows of the Torque feature a durable Matrix SWS fabric that resists abrasion but are still very mobile.
The articulated elbows of the Torque feature a durable Matrix SWS fabric that resists abrasion but are still very mobile.

If a jacket fits you perfectly, the wrist cuffs should not fall when you reach up, and the hem should stay below your waist.

Another factor that has a significant influence on mobility is stretch. Stretch allows a model to fit snugly without impairing mobility. A great example is the Arcteryx Gamma MX which fit nearly as snug as the Columbia Ascender but was far more mobile because of the exceptional stretch. Another benefit to stretch materials is that they are less noisy than windproof fabrics.

Overall, the Outdoor Research Ferrosi was the most mobile contender. It was the only model that allowed full mobility without the cuffs falling or hem rising. Surprisingly, it even beat out models made with stretchier materials. The Marmot ROM, Outdoor Research Ascendant, and Arc'teryx Gamma MX all performed admirably as well. The North Face Apex Bionic 2 scored lowest in this category.

Often, product manufacturers will describe the intended fit of the garment in question, labeling it with descriptors such as "standard", "trim" or "athletic". This can help you in selecting the right product, since an athletic fitting jacket is probably going to be form-fitting, and not allow for lots of layering underneath if that is what you are looking for.

Weight


Weight and packed size can be essential attributes especially on long trips or anytime you have to put the jacket in your pack. We don't place as much of an emphasis on the weight of these products as we do on many other types of outdoor gear. The reason for this is that these products are designed to be breathable enough that they can be worn all day without having to throw them into your pack.


Fast and Light alpine pursuits require clothing that will not slow you down. The Psiphon FL is our Editors' Choice for overall outstanding softshell jacket.
Fast and Light alpine pursuits require clothing that will not slow you down. The Psiphon FL is our Editors' Choice for overall outstanding softshell jacket.

Weight carried on your body isn't as noticeable as weight in a backpack. For this reason, we do not think that weight and packed sizes are the most important factors when choosing a softshell jacket.

The Ferrosi is lightweight and packable  making it an easy choice to bring along just in case. Here it is  stuffed into its own hand pocket  but it can compress to about half this size in your pack.
The Ferrosi is lightweight and packable, making it an easy choice to bring along just in case. Here it is, stuffed into its own hand pocket, but it can compress to about half this size in your pack.

Our scores range from one to ten and reflect the full range of the lightest jacket tested, the Rab Kinetic Plus and the heaviest jacket tested, the Mountain Hardwear Dragon. The two ends of this spectrum are almost a full pound in difference.

When traveling deep into the backcountry  weight will be more of a concern to you than if you were only using your jacket for hikes close to a trailhead.
When traveling deep into the backcountry, weight will be more of a concern to you than if you were only using your jacket for hikes close to a trailhead.

Features


Here we assessed the quality and quantity of each jacket's features as they contribute to its specific end use. We looked at the design of hand warmer pockets, chest pockets, zippers, zipper pulls, pit zips, interior pockets, hoods, thumb loops, and adjustment cords. Well-designed features are critical for overall comfort, ease of use, and storage. Whether you're hoping to stash an entire day's worth of energy bars into your chest pocket or tote around your wallet and keys, great features can make your life easier. To rate each product in this metric, we included the feedback from the dozen or so people that contributed to testing.


Hoods are one of our favorite things, especially on softshells. If you're strolling about in the hills and it starts to snow, you are going to need something on your head to keep you from getting soaked. If you don't have a hood on your softshell, you're going to need some other layer to cover your head be it an insulated jacket, rain jacket, or helmet.

The Torque's hood snugly fits around a climbing helmet and kept the cold out.
The Torque's hood snugly fits around a climbing helmet and kept the cold out.

Hoodless softshells are less versatile but still work well in many instances. If you are carrying a rain jacket (which will have a hood) to put on over your softshell, you might be entirely comfortable without a hood. The Arcteryx Gamma MX is a fantastic hoodless option. For cross-country skiing, we rarely put on our hood and instead prefer a toque or balaclava. Finally, if you're only cruising around town, we think that hoodless models are more stylish.

The two-way zipper allows the Dragon to be used as a belay jacket  without having to tuck in under the harness.
The two-way zipper allows the Dragon to be used as a belay jacket, without having to tuck in under the harness.

Pocket design is also essential. For climbing and backpacking, Napolean style chest pockets are best, like the Rab Torque, since they won't get in the way of your harness or hip belt. Meanwhile, hand warmer pockets are best for around town and general use, like found on the sweatshirt styled pockets of the Patagonia Adze. Fleece-lined pockets can add extra comfort and coziness for your hands, but can also add unnecessary weight and warmth. All of the pockets in this review have zippered closures; without this, snow and water can enter the pocket and make you wet. If you plan on using your jacket with big gloves on, you'll want to look for big zipper pulls that can be easily manipulated.

The Mountain Hardwear Dragon earned the highest scores in this category because nearly every component is designed with the utmost attention to detail and balances function with ergonomics and style. With its super easy to use drawcords, this jacket was also easy to adjust.

The easy to use thumb loops are a great improvement in this year's model of the OR Ferrosi.
The easy to use thumb loops are a great improvement in this year's model of the OR Ferrosi.

Style


We feel that it's important that you look good in a jacket you spend a lot of money on, especially one that works so well around town. Therefore we scored each jacket based on our testers' perception of its aesthetic appeal. We recognize that our assessment is subjective and, consequently, we make it a mere five percent of each jacket's total score.


In our opinion, simple exteriors look better than complex multi-color patterns. For around town, our testers prefer basic, handsome jackets like the Arcteryx Gamma MX and The North Face Apex Bionic 2 over models like the Rab Torque or Mountain Hardwear Dragon, which have offset colored zippers and duo color fabric designs. It's also important here to consider the fit of your jacket.

Subtle styling and simple pocket layout make the Ascender a jacket for casual occasions.
Subtle styling and simple pocket layout make the Ascender a jacket for casual occasions.

If good looks and around town use are a top priority, consider the Arcteryx Gamma MX or another classic non-hooded model that offers high technical performance as well.

The tailored fit and stretchy panels allowed this shell to move effortlessly on a hidden Yosemite scramble
The tailored fit and stretchy panels allowed this shell to move effortlessly on a hidden Yosemite scramble

Accessories


Softshells, especially uninsulated models, are great to pair with other layers, such as a fleece, to increase the warmth. Most softshells pair well with our fleece jacket Top Pick Award winner, the Patagonia R1 Hoody. As we've mentioned multiple times in our review, we recommend purchasing a hardshell or rain jacket and an insulated jacket before you invest in a softshell.

Best for Specific Applications


Cross-country skiing: Arcteryx Gamma MX
Around town: Patagonia Adze
Summer alpine climbing: Rab Torque and Rab Kinetic Plus
Winter alpine climbing: Mountain Hardwear Dragon
Ice climbing: Rab Torque
Resort skiing: Black Diamond Dawn Patrol
Backcountry skiing: Black Diamond Dawn Patrol
Backpacking: Arcteryx Psiphon FL
Most versatile: Outdoor Research Ferrosi

Conclusion


Here's a perfect day for a softshell: cold temps  a cool breeze  and lots of activity.
Here's a perfect day for a softshell: cold temps, a cool breeze, and lots of activity.

Softshell jackets have become a staple in the closet of most outdoor enthusiasts, for the reason that they can repel wind and light precipitation while still allowing you to move freely and expel perspiration, something the average hardshell jacket is not designed to do. For active pursuits in cold weather, consider a softshell with additional lining for warmth, while warmer weather or in dryer conditions an unlined softshell will work better. The sheer number of jackets available may be daunting, but we hope this review sets you up to choose the right one for your needs.
Ryan Huetter

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