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Best Windbreaker for Men of 2020

Catching wind above 12 000 feet in New Mexico. A windbreaker offers a lightweight  breathable alternative for all your active pursuits  and is suitable to pack as a backup layer for all but the worst weather.
Wednesday November 18, 2020
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Our team of experts has spent eight years testing over 30 of the best windbreakers. For our latest 2020 update, we bought and tested 11 of the best models on today's market for our comprehensive side-by-side analysis. From the chill of autumn to springtime gales, a windbreaker jacket is a fantastic lightweight option to help keep the chill off your bones. We breakdown each jacket: which are the lightest, the most wind- and weather-resistant, and which present the best value. So you have no excuse not to carry this essential, packable layer in your kit.

Related: Best Windbreaker Jacket For Women

Top 11 Product Ratings

Displaying 1 - 5 of 11
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Best Overall Windbreaker


Patagonia Houdini


Editors' Choice Award

$99.00
at Backcountry
See It

79
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Wind Resistance - 30% 8
  • Breathability and Venting - 30% 8
  • Weight and Packability - 20% 8
  • Fit and Functionality - 10% 7
  • Water Resistance - 10% 8
Weight: 3.9 oz (size Large) | Pockets: 1 zip (chest)
Balances wind resistance and breathability
Simple, lightweight design
Packs down super small
Good DWR coating
No feature to stow hood
Thin material can feel clammy when sweaty
Single, small chest pocket

The Houdini is an iconic windbreaker jacket and sets the standard for all other jackets in this category. It performs as a windbreaker jacket should — easily stowed away until you need to break it out to protect you from wind and light rain. The entire jacket stuffs into its chest pocket, resulting in a tiny package that is, all-in-all, about the size of a small banana. It easily clips to a belt, climbing harness, or stashes into the smallest corner of your pack. It even fits in those tiny, under-the-bike-seat (saddle) bags. The DWR coating is at the top of its class — compared to other ultralight options — and does a solid job of balancing wind resistance with breathability.

With this new makeover, the historically too-small chest pocket of the Houdini has been updated to accommodate the ever-growing size of newer smartphones. If biking, running, or skiing downhill — or in any aggressive wind — the hood catches a lot of air, with no easy way to stow it. Since pushing up the sleeves is one of the best ways to help increase ventilation, we would also like to see full-elastic wrist cuffs. These small criticisms aside, this is still our favorite windbreaker jacket. We think it is optimal for all-day mountain adventures, long trail runs or free climbs, and evening mountain bike laps.

Read review: Patagonia Houdini

Best Bang for the Buck


Billabong Wind Swell Anorak


Best Buy Award

$48.96
(30% off)
at Backcountry
See It

65
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Wind Resistance - 30% 8
  • Breathability and Venting - 30% 6
  • Weight and Packability - 20% 4
  • Fit and Functionality - 10% 6
  • Water Resistance - 10% 9
Weight: 10.4 oz. (size Medium) | Pockets: 2 kangaroo
Outstanding water resistance
Surf-wear inspired style
Affordable
No zippered pockets
Difficult to pull on and off
Bulkier than most to pack

Like other anoraks we have tested in the past, the affordable Billabong Wind Swell punches well-beyond its weight-class in certain aspects. With a streetwear-appropriate style that falls somewhere between a classic windbreaker and surfer-bro, you will undoubtedly receive compliments on this fashionable jacket. Its mini-ripstop fabric is comprised of 58% recycled polyester derived from single-use plastics, so it is environmentally-friendly in terms of construction and long-lasting durability. When it comes time to hike-up out from your secret surf spot, this jacket is surprisingly breathable, thanks to an upper back panel that combines large, open-air vents with an interior mesh layer that helps wick away moisture. We were also seriously impressed with the Wind Swell's weather-resistance, with a rating that is not quite waterproof but definitely much more than just water-resistant.

But for all of its flair, this stylish pull-over is lacking in a few critical areas. In particular, we would not highlight this as a "technical" piece of outerwear. Not only is it nearly 2.5-times the weight of the majority of windbreaker jackets in this review, but it is significantly more bulky to wear and to pack. While you can stuff the jacket into one side of its divided kangaroo-pouch pockets, the lack of any zippered pockets means that there is no efficient means of storage. The anorak style can also make it awkward and difficult to pull on and take off — not exactly a trait we look for when positioned precariously at a hanging belay. But the Wind Swell certainly lives up to its name when it comes to wind and weather resistance. So if you intend to wear this jacket to seek comfort from chilly sea-spray, we couldn't recommend it enough, especially considering the price-point.

Read review: Billabong Wind Swell Anorak

Best for Overall Function


Rab Vital Windshell


Top Pick Award

$98.95
at Amazon
See It

74
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Wind Resistance - 30% 8
  • Breathability and Venting - 30% 7
  • Weight and Packability - 20% 7
  • Fit and Functionality - 10% 9
  • Water Resistance - 10% 6
Weight: 4.7 oz (size Medium) | Pockets: 3 zip (2 hand & 1 internal)
Three large, zippered pockets
Stiffened brim on fully elastic hood
Neck snap for ventilation
Great fit adjustability
Lack of DWR
Not that breathable
Brim looks goofy

The Rab Vital Windshell is packed with pockets, loaded with features, and still costs less than many jackets in this review. While other jackets may weigh fractions of an ounce less, the Vital has an advantage when it comes to additional features. There are two big hand pockets and a large internal pocket at waist level. A neck snap lets you completely unzip the jacket but still keep it in place, which helps quickly dump heat or adjust midlayers. We're split on the hood brim — it does provide extra rain deflection, but it looks goofy and makes it harder to fit under a bike helmet.

The material — although a lightweight, ripstop-nylon — does not breathe well. In side-by-side bike climbs with other top-ranking windbreakers, we were much more swampy inside this jacket. Without a DWR finish, this jacket will help in a fog, but don't expect it to keep you dry very long, even in light rain. But, if you value features and pockets over breathability and water-repellency, then the Vital is one of the best options in this review.

Read review: Rab Vital Windshell

Best for Aerobic Performance


Patagonia Houdini Air


Top Pick Award

$169.00
at Backcountry
See It

77
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Wind Resistance - 30% 6
  • Breathability and Venting - 30% 10
  • Weight and Packability - 20% 8
  • Fit and Functionality - 10% 7
  • Water Resistance - 10% 6
Weight: 4.0 oz (size Medium) | Pockets: 1 zip (chest)
Super breathable as outer or midlayer
Next-to-skin comfort of recycled nylon
Quick to dry
Lacking wind resistance
Smaller chest pocket
Material quickly soaks

In the few ways we have to criticize the award-winning Houdini, the Patagonia Houdini Air makes up for when it comes to fast-and-light performance. Truly incredible in terms of breathability, this super lightweight shell works as a running jacket and doubles equally well as a mid-layer for ski touring. This windbreaker is built with a texturized nylon — 51% of which is post-consumer recycled material — that is soft to the touch and airy to wear. We also find that the fit is more athletically cut than the original, both more flattering to wear out on the town and more comfortable to layer underneath a harness.

With all of the benefits of the Houdini Air, there have to be a few sacrifices. Otherwise, this windbreaker would have easily taken the top spot in our review. As a trade-off for leaping improvements in breathability, a stiff wind easily cuts through the thin, single-layer nylon. Even though there are thoughtful additions to improve water resistance, like fully taped seams on the chest pocket, the DWR finish is not enough to stop anything more than a quick passing storm. An ideal choice for uphill athletes, but maybe not those climbers looking at a questionable forecast, considering the Houdini Air all comes down to what you are looking for in a windbreaker jacket.

Read review: Patagonia Houdini Air


Regardless of season  a windbreaker is a lightweight  packable alternative to always have stashed away in the bottom of your pack. We appreciate the SmartWool Merino Sport UL for its ability to breath during aerobic activity  like skinning.
Regardless of season, a windbreaker is a lightweight, packable alternative to always have stashed away in the bottom of your pack. We appreciate the SmartWool Merino Sport UL for its ability to breath during aerobic activity, like skinning.

Why You Should Trust Us


Our windbreaker jacket expert is Aaron Rice. Growing up on the Atlantic coastline, learning to ski in Vermont and Maine, and living up and down the Rocky Mountains for the past decade, he knows about all different types of wind and weather. Just ask him, and he will happily tell you that "weather is his jam" — he even holds a bachelor's degree in atmospheric and climate science. Now living in Santa Fe, NM, Aaron wears many different professional hats, dividing his work seasonally between farming and writing in the summers, and ski patrol and avalanche education in the winters. He spends much of his time outside and draws on past experience as a retail buyer to dissect and discuss the nuances of technical gear. Aaron often finds himself in some questionably windy situations, whether in the high mountains or out in the desert. If you don't quite know what we're talking about, go and visit New Mexico in the spring, and you'll understand.

A jacket definitely not meant for the harsh cold of the alpine  but we went there anyway!
Better running downhill than up  the Vital Windshell kept us warm on this chilly run but turned into a sweat-suit on extended uphills.
This jacket was particularly suited for leg-powered activities  like mountain biking. Here  we're cruising a long descent in the foothills over Santa Fe.

To effectively test these products, we identified key metrics that help define a truly great windbreaker jacket: wind resistance, breathability and venting; weight and packability; fit and functionality; and water resistance. Through research and our own personal experience, we developed a series of comprehensive and mutually exclusive tests. To test key criteria like wind resistance, we sought out windy mountaintops and coastlines to evaluate these jackets in the field. But for other metrics, like water resistance, we conducted laboratory-style tests that could be easily recreated.

Related: How We Tested Wind Jackets

Windbreakers are a nearly perfect companion for bike commuting  especially during the fall or spring shoulder seasons.
Windbreakers are a nearly perfect companion for bike commuting, especially during the fall or spring shoulder seasons.

Analysis and Test Results


The high desert of the American Southwest provides a perfect testing ground for our field research — in one day, we can easily travel from chilly alpine ridges down to sun-soaked desert landscapes. We tested these jackets through a variety of activities — mountain biking, trail running, uphill and downhill skiing, backpacking, camping, and climbing — as well as simple, everyday activities like walks in the park or trips to the store. All along the way, we continually made notes on special features and nuanced differences in fit, evaluating and re-assessing each jacket's relative strengths and weaknesses.

Related: Buying Advice for Wind Jackets

We acknowledge that some criteria are more important than others when considering windbreaker jackets. For example, we give greater weight to critical metrics like wind resistance and packability. It is also important to recognize that all of the jackets we chose to include in this review are among some of the best products available today. Since our scoring is based on direct, side-by-side comparisons, a low score doesn't mean that a jacket isn't worth your while. It simply means that it didn't perform as well relative to the competition. We also recognize that your specific needs may differ from how heavily we scored each metric. We offer various windbreakers in this review to accommodate all situations — but be sure to carefully consider your own preferences before settling on a particular jacket.

Testing side-by-side with the KUHL Parajax  the Patagonia Houdini is less expensive and performs better in every category - earning our top award.
Testing side-by-side with the KUHL Parajax, the Patagonia Houdini is less expensive and performs better in every category - earning our top award.

Value


An essential aspect of any purchase is the value it offers. While it is often true that items that cost more often correspond with higher performance, this is not always the case. We have found time and again that some more affordable items perform nearly as well as the most expensive options, and therefore present a much better value overall.


The Patagonia Houdini represents an exceptional value in this category. Not only is it our top overall scorer, but it is also relatively inexpensive and remarkably durable. This windbreaker jacket should continue to perform well for years across a variety of activities. We recognize that price is a factor affecting every gear-budget and that sometimes even a few dollars can make-or-break the bank. Our outstanding value award-winner, the Billabong Wind Swell Anorak, may not be as well suited to technical outings as the Houdini. But in considering the most important aspects of a windbreaker, it does prove itself more than worthy — and is stylish to boot.

The Wind Swell was great to take on backpacking trips  thanks to its rugged durability and surprising breathabilty.
The Wind Swell was great to take on backpacking trips, thanks to its rugged durability and surprising breathabilty.

Wind Resistance


Wind resistance is understandably one of the most important features these jackets can offer — we weighted this metric as 30 percent of a product's final score. Made of lightweight nylon or polyester, most of these jackets utilize an incredibly tight fabric-weave to muster wind resistance. The tighter the fabric is woven together, the less space between individual fibers, and the less air-permeable the fabric becomes. The Ortovox windbreaker is special in this case, utilizing a proprietary weave that incorporates Merino wool and nylon into a single layer, resulting in an exceptionally wind-resistant jacket.


Besides wearing these jackets nearly every day for months on end and noticing how we felt, we tested for wind resistance by forcing air through the fabric at close range. We used a hairdryer and our mouths. By combining these methods, we can get a pretty good idea of how easily air passed through each fabric. To back up our findings, we wore all of the jackets at the top of a 12,000-foot peak in the Sangre De Cristo Mountains on a windy day when gusts hit 35 mph, and wind chill temperatures reached zero degrees Fahrenheit. We compared our previous findings with side-by-side testing of how each jacket felt in the strong, cold winds and are confident that we can tell which jackets are the most and least wind resistant.

Just to be certain it was actually as cold and windy as it felt (...it was)  we pulled out a wind-meter at the top of a ski tour in the Sangre De Cristo Mountains of northern New Mexico.
Just to be certain it was actually as cold and windy as it felt (...it was), we pulled out a wind-meter at the top of a ski tour in the Sangre De Cristo Mountains of northern New Mexico.

In addition to the nylon fabric weave used in construction, a couple of other factors are vital in a jacket's performance to properly fight the wind. Fit is critical, and windbreakers work better when they fit close to the body. Features that help seal out the wind, like elastic on the sleeve cuffs and drawcords on the hem and hood, make a huge difference if you are battling a strong, sustained wind. These are easy entry points where the wind can circumvent your carefully-woven nylon barrier.

Some chilly  mountaintop testing of wind resistance in the less-than-ideal Patagonia Houdini Air.
Some chilly, mountaintop testing of wind resistance in the less-than-ideal Patagonia Houdini Air.

The Rab Vital Windshell, an unlined jacket, seems to have either a tighter weave than the rest or use a different type of nylon altogether — both of which lead to increased wind resistance. The Vital also employs all of the features we mentioned above and more — elastic cuffs, drawcords on the hem, zippered hand pockets, a storm flap behind the front zipper, and a full elastic hood — to bolster its wind resistance.

Zippered hand-pockets on jackets like the Rab Vital can make all the difference when you really need to warm your fingers.
Zippered hand-pockets on jackets like the Rab Vital can make all the difference when you really need to warm your fingers.

Breathability and Venting


Since these jackets are most often used as an alternative, lightweight outer layer for high-intensity activities, we chose to weight breathability and venting as 30 percent of a product's final score. After all, a jacket with no breathability would trap all of your heat and sweat inside its shell — leading to a horrible cycle of overheating, soaking, and then overcooling you. Wind resistance and breathability are often contrasting ideas in terms of fabric weave and performance. Many manufacturers choose to compensate for poor fabric breathability by including features designed to help with venting. Since these two concepts accomplish the same thing — removal of heat and moisture — we included them together in this metric.


Besides the notes we acquired from field testing, we wanted to judge each jacket side-by-side in a situation that would not incorporate the sun's heat — a major factor here in the Southwest. To analyze which jackets built up the most moisture or which helped us feel the coolest, we cranked up the heat in our gear room to 85-degrees Fahrenheit and put each jacket through a 15-minute workout.

We found that this mesh backing across your shoulders on the KUHL Parajax helped wick away perspiration and keep things a little more dry when wearing a backpack.
We found that this mesh backing across your shoulders on the KUHL Parajax helped wick away perspiration and keep things a little more dry when wearing a backpack.

All of these jackets give bias towards protecting you from the wind, so none of them breathe that well. However, some jackets performed better than the rest, but often for different reasons. Jackets like the KUHL Parajax and Billabong Wind Swell breathe well by effectively wicking moisture from sweat away from the body with a mesh liner. Others include underarm vents — this is perfected by the Smartwool Merino Sport UL, which puts the naturally moisture-wicking power of Merino wool to use by incorporating it into its large, body-mapped ventilation system. But this quality has been perfected by the Patagonia Houdini Air, which earned a nod for those uphill athletes looking for maximum breathability.

The new standard for breathability  the Houdini Air kept us completely dry long after our legs gave out on this training run.
The new standard for breathability, the Houdini Air kept us completely dry long after our legs gave out on this training run.

Weight and Packability


The lightest windbreakers weigh less than a quarter-pound. That's way less than your average, lightweight rain jacket. Every single windbreaker in our review tips the scales at less than 11 ounces. These jackets are not only exceptionally light, but they often pack down to a size smaller than your average Nalgene bottle — so you have little excuse not to throw one of these into your pack for extra weather protection. Overall, we weighted this metric as 20 percent of a product's final score.


With all of them weighing seemingly next to nothing, does it make sense to penalize the ones that are just slightly heavier — but in the grand scheme of things — still lightweight? To fairly balance out this question, we rated each product based upon its weight, but then adjusted the score slightly based on how small and easily the jacket packs up. Every jacket tested manages to stuff into one of their own pockets for easy portability. However, the size they pack down to is not equal, nor is the ease of stuffing them or transporting them afterward. A smaller stuffed size is a valuable attribute for attaching a windbreaker to a harness on a long climb or fitting in a hydration pack for a long mountain bike ride or trail run. Still, it doesn't apply to every situation.

The Arc'teryx Squamish is lightweight and packable enough that you hardly notice it stashed inside a pack  until it's time to break-out to fight off gale-force winds or a passing rain shower.
The Arc'teryx Squamish is lightweight and packable enough that you hardly notice it stashed inside a pack, until it's time to break-out to fight off gale-force winds or a passing rain shower.

The Black Diamond Distance Wind Shell is the lightest jacket in the entire review, and it stuffs down to a tiny package. The Arc'teryx Squamish, the Patagonia Houdini, and the Houdini Air are slightly heavier than the Distance, but all pack into their own chest pocket to relatively the same size. All of the jackets pack into their own pockets in one way or another — many have zippered pockets that double as stuff sacks. Additionally, these stuff sacks often include clip-in loops for easy carrying. Notably, the Columbia Flashback and Billabong Wind Swell do not have this capability and are bulky compared to the competition.

New wind jacket selections  all packed up with a standard Nalgene bottle for reference. Moving down the line from largest on the top left: Patagonia Tezzeron (previously tested)  Marmot Ether DriClime Hoody  The North Face Fanorak  The North Face Flyweight Hoody  KUHL Parajax  Patagonia Houdini  and Black Diamond Distance Shell
The crop of windbreakers from our latest update: a packed-size comparison to a Nalgene bottle  as well as our Editors' favorite Patagonia Houdini (top  middle) and outstanding value North Face Flyweight Hoodie (top  right.) Starting with the middle left: Patagonia Houdini Air  Smartwool Merino Sport UL  Rab Vital  Backcountry Canyonlands  Ortovox Merino  Columbia Flashback
Clockwise top left: Arc'teryx Squamish  Patagonia Houdini Air  Patagonia Houdini  Billabong Wind Swell; compared relative to one another and a standard Nalgene bottle.

Fit and Functionality


It is important for any outdoor garment to fit well for its intended purpose and whether all of the features work as they were intended. When it comes to fit, we checked to see if the sleeves were long enough, if the hood fits over our head well (even with wearing a helmet), and whether the jacket was too baggy or too tight compared to the same sizing in other jackets. We considered whether it was designed to be used as a single layer — in which case we expected it to fit sleeker and closer to the body for optimal performance. If it was meant to be worn more as an outer layer, we wanted to see if it could be layered underneath. We weighed this metric as 10 percent of a product's final score.


Often point deductions came from features that annoyed us: hard to manipulate zippers; hood stowing systems that don't hold; drawcords that are hard to pull or release with one hand; or elastic cuffs and hood liners that aren't tight enough to keep the weather out.

Stripes of reflective material are a thoughtful touch  especially for bike commuters. But often they are too small to catch the eye of a passing car; best to keep your blinking lights on.
Stripes of reflective material are a thoughtful touch, especially for bike commuters. But often they are too small to catch the eye of a passing car; best to keep your blinking lights on.

While we loved the fit of the Squamish Hoody and the fact that it is loaded with features, the Rab Vital Windshell earned a top choice for a combination of function and value. With a similar slew of features as the Squamish, but with more zippered pockets than any other jacket, the Vital is our choice when you don't want added features to compromise your new lightweight wind jacket.

Designed for the harsh climbing conditions of the Scottish highlands and loaded with pockets  we loved this jacket on grey days  as long as the forecast didn't call for heavy precipitation.
Designed for the harsh climbing conditions of the Scottish highlands and loaded with pockets, we loved this jacket on grey days, as long as the forecast didn't call for heavy precipitation.

Water Resistance


While all of these windbreakers purport to be water resistant, none of them are meant to be waterproof. It is a tall order to ask for a jacket that is already wind-resistant, super breathable, super light, packable, cheap, to also be waterproof. We have yet to find such a unicorn of a jacket. We only weighted this metric as 10 percent of a product's final score.


A little bit of water protection is necessary from time to time, so most of these jackets come with a durable water-resistant (DWR) coating applied to the shell. DWR coatings are chemical applications that repel water while still allowing the fabric underneath to breathe properly. But they wear off — especially if you wear a pack over the jacket — or it is subject to lots of abrasion or scuffing. Once the DWR coating is gone, these jackets will no longer be water-resistant, and you will get wet. Luckily, you can re-apply DWR coatings.

The Ortovox Merino windbreaker uses a revolutionary process to combine nylon and Merino wool into a single-layer piece of outerwear. Here  you see the all-natural fiber at work beading up water in our shower test.
The Ortovox Merino windbreaker uses a revolutionary process to combine nylon and Merino wool into a single-layer piece of outerwear. Here, you see the all-natural fiber at work beading up water in our shower test.

Living in a very dry corner of the world, we did not have the opportunity to be doused in real rainstorms very often during our testing. But we also needed to objectively test how these jackets handled the rain in comparison to each other, and so employed a garden hose or showerhead to simulate a passing rain shower. We decided to test these jackets at the end of each test period to get an idea of how well their DWR coating had held up over time. The results spanned the range from impressively good to very bad.

The Houdini has a burly DWR coating that gives it impressive water resistance despite its light weight. It performed just behind the front runners - built with significantly more material - in our hose test.
The Houdini has a burly DWR coating that gives it impressive water resistance despite its light weight. It performed just behind the front runners - built with significantly more material - in our hose test.

The thick shell of the Billabong Wind Swell is an effective means for blocking water, causing water to bead up and roll off easily. For single-layer jackets, the DWR coating applied to the Patagonia Houdini is effective against passing showers — the interwoven treatment of the Distance is not. Regardless, we wouldn't choose any of these jackets if we knew we were walking out the door on a rainy day. Water-resistance is a nice feature in a windbreaker but is certainly not what these jackets are designed for.

The Backcountry Canyonlands was a great choice for keeping us dry and protected from the elements on ski tours  but a little swampy when terrain got too steep.
The Backcountry Canyonlands was a great choice for keeping us dry and protected from the elements on ski tours, but a little swampy when terrain got too steep.

Conclusion


With the nuances of sport-specific design, choosing the perfect windbreaker jacket can be a challenge. All of the products we reviewed here certainly did a good job of protecting us from the wind. Some were better suited to water resistance, while others were much more lightweight. The trick to figuring out which jacket to buy is to figure out how you'll use it.

An inscription on the flip-side of the storage pocket of the Merino Sport UL. We couldn't sum up the need for a windbreaker jacket better ourselves...
An inscription on the flip-side of the storage pocket of the Merino Sport UL. We couldn't sum up the need for a windbreaker jacket better ourselves...

Aaron Rice & Andy Wellman