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Petzl GriGri Review

The gold standard remains the best and most popular belay device available today.
Editors' Choice Award
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Price:  $110 List | $82.39 at REI
Compare prices at 3 resellers
Pros:  Easy catch and hold, feeds slack smoothly, smooth lowering, handles ropes down to 8.5mm
Cons:  A bit clunky, can only use one rope, takes time to master techniques
Manufacturer:   Petzl
By Andy Wellman & Jack Cramer  ⋅  Apr 24, 2019
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76
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#2 of 15
  • Catch and Bite - 30% 9
  • Lowering and Rappelling - 30% 7
  • Feeding Slack - 20% 7
  • Weight and Bulk - 10% 5
  • Auto Block - 10% 9

Our Verdict

The Petzl GriGri is an active assisted braking device that has long been the gold-standard for this genre, seen at crags and gyms all over the world. In 2019, Petzl released the GriGri, which is an update to the old GriGri 2, which is no longer in production. It remains mostly the same, although has a couple of new features, most notably the spring in the cam is a bit tighter, allowing for easier paying out of rope, especially in the standard two-handed tube-style method. It is also now safe to use on ropes as thin as 8.5mm. The GriGri remains our favorite belay device for experienced climbers, and is one of the highest scorers in our comparison rating scale. For less experienced climbers, or those unfamiliar with the GriGri, we also recommend the Petzl GriGri +, which has some added safety features that make it slightly safer and easier to use, but which may seem superfluous for one who has used a GriGri for a long time.


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Petzl GriGri
Awards Editors' Choice Award Editors' Choice Award Top Pick Award Top Pick Award  
Price $82.39 at REI
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Overall Score Sort Icon
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Pros Easy catch and hold, feeds slack smoothly, smooth lowering, handles ropes down to 8.5mmAnti-panic handle, top rope and lead modes feed smoothly, wide range of rope diameters (8.5 - 11mm)Compact, safe and ergonomic way to pay out slack, a bit less expensive than GriGriGreat for belaying seconds on multi-pitch climbs, durable, good valueLightweight, easy to unlock, great for belaying two skinny ropes
Cons A bit clunky, can only use one rope, takes time to master techniquesExpensive, switching modes can be annoying, panic handle locks up easilyMethod of clipping to harness is counter-intuitive, unlocking device under tension takes some practice, easy to lower too quicklyHeavier than the ReversoSofter aluminum seems less durable, not ideal with ropes thicker than 9.5mm
Bottom Line The gold standard remains the best and most popular belay device available today.Excellent assisted braking belay device for both beginners and experienced users.Behind the GriGri and +, this is the second best active assist braking device that we have used.The best belay device for multi pitch climbing, rappels, and double rope ascents.A match made in rock heaven for skinny ropes and climbers counting weight.
Rating Categories Petzl GriGri Petzl GriGri+ Trango Vergo Black Diamond ATC Guide Petzl Reverso
Catch And Bite (30%)
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
8
10
0
5
10
0
5
Lowering And Rappelling (30%)
10
0
7
10
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8
10
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7
10
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9
10
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9
Feeding Slack (20%)
10
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7
10
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7
10
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8
10
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9
10
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9
Weight And Bulk (10%)
10
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5
10
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4
10
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5
10
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8
10
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9
Auto Block (10%)
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
7
10
0
5
10
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3
Specs Petzl GriGri Petzl GriGri+ Trango Vergo Black Diamond ATC... Petzl Reverso
Style Active assisted braking Active assisted braking Active assisted braking Auto-block tube Auto-block tube
Recommended Rope Diameter 8.5 mm - 11 mm 8.5 mm - 11 mm 8.9 mm - 10.7 mm 7.7 mm - 11 mm 7.5 mm - 11 mm
Weight (oz) 6.3 oz. 7.1 oz. 7.1 oz. 2.8 oz. 2.2 oz.
Double Rope Rap? No No No Yes Yes
Belay off anchor? Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Assisted Braking? Yes Yes Yes No No
Warranty 3 year 3 year 1 year 1 year 3 year

Our Analysis and Test Results

Walk around any popular climbing crag and gym and the majority of the belayers you see will be using a GriGri. This is due in large part to the fact that this device basically invented the active assisted braking market, and captured most of the share long before many other alternatives entered the ring. That said, as countless spin-offs from other companies have tried to improve on the GriGri, it keeps getting better, and this newest version is no exception. It is honestly hard to detach our experiences with the GriGri from the over 20 years that we have spent using one. Each of the testers who used it shared the same experience. It has become like an extension of our bodies when belaying, and there is no thought needed to manipulate it in the correct way. This is a good thing, and a plausible argument in itself for purchasing if GriGri if you are on the fence. Because almost everyone else uses one, it is easier to find good teachers, to check each other's belays for safety, and wise to know how to use one if you or your partner forgets their belay device for the day. For all of these reasons, and because they really do function at a high level, this is the active assist braking device that we recommend before any other!

Learn How to Use Your GriGri Correctly! For instructions and video, click here .

Differences Between GriGri and Old GriGri 2
The original was called simply the GriGri. But now, the third iteration is also called the GriGri, causing confusion for some. Rest assured, this is a newly updated model of the GriGri 2. There are a few main differences. The biggest one is that it can use ropes down to 8.5mm safely, whereas the 2 was rated only down to 8.9mm ropes. The camming spring is also a bit tighter, so it is easier to feed out slack in traditional belay mode, without needing to use the thumb to block the cam all of the time. There is a minor difference in the design at the back, so the rope doesn't run over an aluminum edge, making it sharp over time as it wears. The thumb catch where one locks out the cam is slightly smaller and lower profile. There is also a spot to write your name, and a hole through the aluminum face plate, a convenient place to tie a keeper cord without needing to drill a hole (some people like to do this for self-belaying). Lastly, there is some added springy play in the lowering handle that makes it slightly easier to lower in a comfortably brisk pace, without accidentally opening the cam up all the way. In our opinion, all of these changes make for an improved GriGri.

The newest GriGri on top compared to the old GriGri 2 on the bottom (yellow). What you can see from this photo is the change in the back of the cam  where there never used to be a plate  and now there is. This point on the 2 led to wear of the faceplate where a sharp edge would form.
The newest GriGri on top compared to the old GriGri 2 on the bottom (yellow). What you can see from this photo is the change in the back of the cam, where there never used to be a plate, and now there is. This point on the 2 led to wear of the faceplate where a sharp edge would form.

Differences Between GriGri and GriGri+
There are two main differences between the GriGri and the +, and a number of smaller ones. The + has an anti-panic feature on the lowering bar, so if you pull it too far back, opening the cam too far, it clicks over and stops lowering. The + also has the toggle switch between top-rope and lead modes, which changes the tightness of the cam spring. The GriGri is always in lead mode, which still works fine for top-roping if you keep your hand on the brake. The + has a stainless steel insert where the rope runs to improve longevity in this spot that commonly wears out, while the GriGri does not. The GriGri, on the other hand, is $50 cheaper, and weighs almost one ounce less.

The GriGri on top compared to the GriGri+ on the bottom. As you can see  the cam shape and design is very similar with these two devices  and when the + is in lead mode  they feel very much the same while feeding out slack.
The GriGri on top compared to the GriGri+ on the bottom. As you can see, the cam shape and design is very similar with these two devices, and when the + is in lead mode, they feel very much the same while feeding out slack.

Performance Comparison


The Petzl GriGri is the second highest rated product in our overall testing, behind only the GriGri +.

Using a GriGri to lead belay on the classic arete climb Latest Rage at Smith Rock. The GriGri is the most popular belay device you can buy  but requires learning the proper techniques to belay safely and effectively.
Using a GriGri to lead belay on the classic arete climb Latest Rage at Smith Rock. The GriGri is the most popular belay device you can buy, but requires learning the proper techniques to belay safely and effectively.

Catch and Bite


The GriGri is one of the most reliable catchers among all belay devices. It is designed so the rope runs over a spring-loaded cam inside the device. When upward tension is placed on the rope, the friction rotates the cam that pinches the rope. Only the tiniest amount of grip on the brake hand is required to assist with the tension needed to lock up the cam, and once the rope is locked no grip strength is needed to keep the cam locked. Along with the GriGri+, this newest version is the only active assist belay device that can accommodate ropes down to 8.5mm, which may seem a little ridiculous, but just wait as they become far more popular in the next few years.


The Camp Matik is another active assist device that pinches the rope in a very similar way, and also received high scores for this function. The Trango Vergo, while pinching the rope very quickly as well, is a bit more grabby, locking up even quicker as it doesn't have a spring as part of its design.

As long as the brake hand is grasping the rope  the GriGri locks very reliably and holds the rope easily. While it is wise to keep the brake hand on the line  once locked the GriGri can easily hold the climber by itself.
As long as the brake hand is grasping the rope, the GriGri locks very reliably and holds the rope easily. While it is wise to keep the brake hand on the line, once locked the GriGri can easily hold the climber by itself.

Lowering and Rappelling


In order to lower or rappel with the GriGri, one bends back a retractable plastic handle and uses it as a lever arm to open the cam that is pinching the rope. It is critical to keep a hand on the brake end of the rope during this time, which controls the speed at which one lowers. Depending on the thickness and the newness of the rope you are using, it can be hard to find the sweet spot for the smoothest lowering. It's easy to toggle between too far open and fast, versus the cam suddenly catching the rope and halting the lowering. When it comes to rappelling, the versatility of this device is limited a bit by only being able to handle one rope.


Its design is virtually the same as that found on the Trango Vergo. It is slightly different than the previous GriGri 2 in that there is a small spring in the handle that makes the sweet spot for smooth lowering a little wider, or so it seems. However, it requires more vigilance than the safer panic mode levers found on the GriGri+, Camp Matik, and the Edelrid Eddy. Standard tube-style belay devices offer the smoothest lowering action, and are the most common for rappelling as well.

To lower with the GriGri  simply bend back the retractable handle with the left hand while gripping the brake rope with the right  as shown here. The brake rope can loop straight as it is for a less twisty rope  or you can loop it over to the right  as many people do  increasing the friction but sometimes adding twists and kinks.
To lower with the GriGri, simply bend back the retractable handle with the left hand while gripping the brake rope with the right, as shown here. The brake rope can loop straight as it is for a less twisty rope, or you can loop it over to the right, as many people do, increasing the friction but sometimes adding twists and kinks.

Feeding Slack


The GriGri is a very easy device to use, except when it comes to feeding slack. It is worth learning the tricks from a veteran climber, and especially watching the video that Petzl puts out, linked above. This newest version allows one to feed slack in the same manner as one would with a tube-style device far more easily without the cam locking up. However, when you want to feed out a lot of slack very quickly, the preferred method is to hold the brake end of the rope in the right hand, and at the same time use it to depress the cam with the thumb, pulling out an armload of slack with the left. If a climber was to fall with the cam depressed, they could conceivably fall further than desired, which is why it's important to keep the brake rope in hand at all times.


We found the method of feeding with the Trango Vergo to be a bit more intuitive, ergonomic, and safer. With this device you never need to lock open the braking cam, so there would never be the risk that more rope than desired would whizz through the device. As they are when rappelling, the tube-style devices, such as the Black Diamond ATC XP or Petzl Verso are the easiest to quickly feed slack smoothly without locking up.

The method of paying out slack quickly with a GriGri requires depressing the cam with the thumb of the brake hand  then pulling slack through with the left hand. It is important to keep the brake line  looped back here  in the palm of the brake hand  so that if the climber slips while the cam is depressed  you still have control of the brake.
The method of paying out slack quickly with a GriGri requires depressing the cam with the thumb of the brake hand, then pulling slack through with the left hand. It is important to keep the brake line, looped back here, in the palm of the brake hand, so that if the climber slips while the cam is depressed, you still have control of the brake.

Weight and Bulk


This new GriGri weighs 6.3 ounces, which is around 0.2 ounces heavier than the last version, which may simply be due to variances in the scale, and is negligible. While GriGris are pretty bulky compared to tube-style devices, they are around average or even a little smaller than most of the other active assist devices.


This version is about an ounce lighter than the +, as well as the Vergo. On the other hand, it is way lighter and smaller than either the Matik or Eddy. For a slightly lighter but more compact version that works virtually the same way, check out the Madrock Lifeguard.

The new GriGri weighs perhaps 0.2 ounces more than the old one  but remains impressively light for such a large device. It is the second lightest active assist device that we have tested.
The new GriGri weighs perhaps 0.2 ounces more than the old one, but remains impressively light for such a large device. It is the second lightest active assist device that we have tested.

Auto Block


Due to its locking action, the GriGri can be used to belay off the anchor like an auto-blocking tube-style device. However, you must redirect the brake end of the rope in order to lower someone. When pulling in slack as the second climbs, keeping a hand on the brake end is enough to ensure it will lock if a fall is taken. But when lowering, the brake rope needs to go up (as opposed to down, since the device is hanging off the anchor upside down), to provide adequate braking power. To make this less awkward, take the brake rope upward from the device and clip it to a higher carabiner on the anchor, redirecting it back down to you so you can maintain adequate braking control.


In our comparative testing, the GriGri and GriGri+ were the two best performers in terms of minimizing friction in auto-block mode. The rope runs through them the easiest, meaning it takes the least amount of muscle power to conduct a belay in this fashion. The only downside to these devices is they can only use one rope. However, the double-rope devices that use a traditional auto-block setup, like the Petzl Reverso and BD ATC Guide have much more friction built into the system.

It is possible to belay the second climber off the anchor using the GriGri in the manner shown here. The hand should always remain on the brake strand. In order to lower  you will need to re-direct the brake line upwards and loop it through a carabiner higher in the anchor to maintain enough braking control with the brake hand.
It is possible to belay the second climber off the anchor using the GriGri in the manner shown here. The hand should always remain on the brake strand. In order to lower, you will need to re-direct the brake line upwards and loop it through a carabiner higher in the anchor to maintain enough braking control with the brake hand.

Best Applications


The GriGri is ideal for use while cragging, either sport or trad, or at the gym. It is an ideal choice for projecting harder routes due to the effortless lock off, and is likewise the top choice for top-rope belaying for the same reason. Many people like carrying GriGris on multi-pitch climbs, but carrying a traditional belay device for rappelling two ropes is still needed and advised in this case.

The GriGri is the most popular sport climbing belay device in the world  perfect for clipping bolts at a place like Smith Rock. It also works great for all other styles of climbing as well.
The GriGri is the most popular sport climbing belay device in the world, perfect for clipping bolts at a place like Smith Rock. It also works great for all other styles of climbing as well.

Value


This device retails for $110, up $10 from the 2, but $50 cheaper than the +. Since we find it to be the most useful and also highest functioning of all belay devices available today, we think this presents a pretty solid value. For those who climb intermittently, it will likely last many years. For those who climb a lot in the desert or outside all of the time, there are parts of this device that will wear out relatively quick, in as short as a year depending on usage, and the + may be a more durable bet.

Conclusion


The Petzl GriGri is the best and most popular active assist braking device on the market today. If you are looking to add a little bit of security to your belaying beyond the simple tube, this is the device we would recommend before any other.

Hangdog belaying beneath the climb Latest Rage in the Dihedrals at Smith Rock. The lock off power of a GriGri  ensuring you dont have to grip the rope tight the whole time someone is hanging  is the number one reason why you would want to own a device like this one.
Hangdog belaying beneath the climb Latest Rage in the Dihedrals at Smith Rock. The lock off power of a GriGri, ensuring you dont have to grip the rope tight the whole time someone is hanging, is the number one reason why you would want to own a device like this one.


Andy Wellman & Jack Cramer