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Hilleberg Nallo 2 Review

A spacious and strong model built for high winds.
Hilleberg Nallo 2
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Price:  $750 List | $750.00 at MooseJaw
Pros:  Spacious and strong for its weight, top-of-the-line poles and fabrics, easy to set up, poles insert from outside, inner tent is attached to outer tent, great high and low ventilation, spectra guy lines with camming adjusters, inner tent is removable
Cons:  Zipper pulls are hard to grab with gloves and rattle in high winds, needs a larger area to pitch and can be more challenging to setup in rockier terrain
Manufacturer:   Hilleberg
By Ian Nicholson ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Apr 9, 2018
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69
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#14 of 19
  • Weight - 27% 8
  • Livability - 18% 6
  • Weather/Storm Resistance - 25% 5
  • Ease of Set-up - 10% 8
  • Durability - 10% 8
  • Versatility - 10% 8

The Skinny

The Hilleberg Nallo 2 is a world-class tunnel tent that falls awkwardly between the company's lighter three-season Anjan 2 and the heavier Antarctic exploring Nammatj 2. The Nallo performed well in high winds but not as well when it came to snow loading. For real mountain winter conditions, our testers reached for stronger tents like the Nammatj 2; for three-season use, we reach to contenders found in the Backpacking Tent Review or Ultralight Tent Review. The Hilleberg Nammatj 2 is a much better overall value than the Nallo, but perhaps your ideal applications align well with the Nallo's capabilities.


Compare to Similar Products

Our Analysis and Test Results

The Hilleberg Nallo 2 is the lightest double wall model in our review. While it's not as bombproof as other models, it finds a nice balance between strength and weight and is storm-worthy enough for a majority of summer-time mountaineering trips in the lower-48. The Nallo 2 has a relatively spacious interior and a decent sized vestibule. The only thing that kept our review team from liking the Nallo is that it needs a fairly big area to pitch it compared to other models. The Nallo was easy to set up on snow or in established campsites but trickier to pitch in rockier terrain. The Nallo 2 remains quite versatile, handling condensation and moisture better than all the single wall models in our review while being comparable in weight to the most versatile of those shelters.

Performance Comparison



Ease of Set-Up


The Nallo is very quick to set up. Simply peg out the ground level guy points, insert the two poles into the pole sleeves, and peg and tighten the guylines. You can use as few as four pegs to pitch it.

Weather Resistance


The Nallo uses 9 mm DAC Featherlite NSL poles, the best available, and also the same model used on the Hilleberg Anjan 2, and dozens of other tents from Hilleberg and other brands. In contrast, the Hilleberg Nammatj 2 uses much stronger 10.2 mm poles.

The Nallo is capable of handling powerful winds. We know of only a few other double wall tents that weigh a similar amount and stand up to strong winds better. Unfortunately, the same cannot be said for static strength; the Nallo performs only moderately well at resisting heavy snow loads and nearly broke during one night of testing. See the photo below. In such a storm, it's essential to attentively knock snow off the roof and vestibule, and clear it away from the sides of the tent. If it's dumping, we suggest setting an hourly alarm and going outside to remove snow from the vestibule and walls and check on the tie outs.

This picture shows 4" of heavy  wet snow on the Nallo 2. This shelter needs "maintenance" during heavy snowfall. You need to be inside or near it to knock snow off. The Nammatj is much stronger!
This picture shows 4" of heavy, wet snow on the Nallo 2. This shelter needs "maintenance" during heavy snowfall. You need to be inside or near it to knock snow off. The Nammatj is much stronger!

The Nallo has many attributes that contribute to its strength and durability. Perhaps the most important is its outer tent fabric, Kerlon 1200, which is likely the third most robust woven fabric found on any tent we've tested. It has a tear strength of 26.5 lbs., yet weighs only 1.47 oz/sq.yd. This impressive performance is because the fabric has three layers of 100% silicon. Silicon is more expensive, but also a superior product, to the polyurethane (PU) that is typically used instead.

There are additional features that help make it more resistant to weather than other tents. (1) The outer tent goes down to the ground, which blocks wind, snow, and limits most splashback from driving rain. (2) The poles sleeves can accommodate an extra set of poles, which makes the tent significantly stronger. (3) Ground straps are oriented perpendicular to the tent to take stress off the poles and keep them at the right height. They can also be used as guylines if needed. Hilleberg is the only manufacturer to include this feature. (4) The vestibule has a "door band," which keeps it in the proper shape and minimizes tension on the zippers. (5) Reinforced guy points and the adjusters are metal and not plastic. (6) Spectra guylines that don't absorb water or stretch. The Nallo's guylines also have camming adjusters.

Front to back: Hilleberg Soulo  Nammatj 3 GT  and the Nallo 2. A single wall Nemo model is pictured in far rear.
Front to back: Hilleberg Soulo, Nammatj 3 GT, and the Nallo 2. A single wall Nemo model is pictured in far rear.

Livability


The Nallo is slightly smaller than the Nammatj. The author has spent more than 40 nights in the Nallo and can attest to the fact that it is very comfortable for its weight and weather protection. But the extra 11 oz. to step up to the Nammatj 2 bring more interior volume, more space to sit up, and a vestibule that is better for cooking in. Ventilation is a key component of tent design, and the Nallo does well at managing condensation.

There's plenty of space for two inside the Nallo 2. Also note the rear vent  clothesline  and how the door unzips and stuffs into the pocket.
There's plenty of space for two inside the Nallo 2. Also note the rear vent, clothesline, and how the door unzips and stuffs into the pocket.

Unlike similar tents from other companies, the Nallo's vestibule has a continuous zipper that hits the ground in two places, making a significant arc. There are four zipper pulls that provide multiple configurations for opening the door: open from the left or the right, or pull both zippers down if you can't reach one of the two down by the floor. We appreciate these options.

Inside view of the Nallo 2 vestibule. 20L and 30L packs lie on top of two 60L packs. There's enough space for lots of gear  or for cooking and a moderate amount of gear.
Inside view of the Nallo 2 vestibule. 20L and 30L packs lie on top of two 60L packs. There's enough space for lots of gear, or for cooking and a moderate amount of gear.

Durability


The Nallo's fabrics are tougher than perhaps all other double wall tents that weigh a similar amount. But the tent is significantly less durable than the Hilleberg Nammatj 2, which uses tougher fabrics all around. If you consider durability to include pole design, then many freestanding single wall tents are more durable than the Nallo because they are less likely to collapse from snow loading.

Weight/Packed Size


Without stakes, the tent weighs 4 lb. 12 oz. and packs down reasonably small. There are lighter options in our fleet, as well as heavier.

Adaptability


You can remove the inner tent for summer backpacking.

The inner tent hangs roughly 4" below the outer one and can be removed quickly with elasticized toggles.
The inner tent hangs roughly 4" below the outer one and can be removed quickly with elasticized toggles.

This is an excellent option because even though there is no floor, the tent walls and vestibule extend to the ground and create a reasonably good seal to prevent insects from flying inside.

Remove the Nallo 2's inner tent (takes about a minute) and you have an expansive floorless tarp shelter.
Remove the Nallo 2's inner tent (takes about a minute) and you have an expansive floorless tarp shelter.

Features


Hilleberg should ditch their old clunky metal zipper pulls and replace them with two colors of reflective cord (one color on the inside, another color on the outside) and replace all the lines with a reflective cord. We've wanted them to do this for years. Most other companies do. It would make the tent much easier to use and perhaps lighter, too.

Best Applications


Although the Nallo is a spectacular tent, our testers often reach for the Hilleberg's Nammatj or Jannu more than this one. We feel the Nallo's best application is extended international bicycle touring, where you occasionally cross a high pass and windy desert where the solid nylon interior and performance in high winds can be useful. This model is unnecessarily heavy for backpacking and not burly enough for winter use in the mountains.

Value


At $750 this tent is not cheap and is certainly on the more expensive side of the shelters including in this review. With that said, it offers enough advantages that we still find it a solid value for several reasons. One of the biggest is its versatility across a wide range of climates, below average weight, and that it is among the most long-lasting models in our review.

Conclusion


The *Hilleberg Nallo 2* is a solid performing tunnel-style tent that performs fairly well across a range of conditions, though its set-up can be more cumbersome than other models in our review. It is one of the lighter tents that we tested and the lightest overall double wall four-season model. It handles condensation like a champion making it suitable for occasional three-season use but it's not incredible for harsher four-season conditions.

Video



In the video below the tent could have been pitched with considerably more lengthwise tension, which would have reduced the flapping considerably.



Ian Nicholson