Hands-on Gear Review

Le Chameau Vierzon Review

Price:  $190 List | $178.75 at Amazon
Pros:  Tall Shaft, gusseted, good traction
Cons:  Loose fit, not insulated, poor comfort
Editors' Rating:   
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Shaft Height (from bottom of sole to lowest point at top of shaft):  16.75 in
Sizing info:  1/2 size order down
Weight of pair (sizes varying):  4lbs 11.3oz (size 11)
Manufacturer:   Le Chameau

Our Verdict

The Le Chameau Vierzon is a tall rain boot that offers great protection from precipitous weather. The tread has great traction and the rubber shaft is very supple, which means it bends and twists with your foot as you move. The thin liner lacks the ability to retain a significant amount of heat on cold days, which may be a plus for consumers who live in milder climates. However, our testers thought that this was one of the least fashionable boots we tested. If you need a warm rain boot with a tall shaft, check out the The Original Muck Boot Company Arctic Sport - Men's.]


RELATED REVIEW: The 10 Best Rain Boots for Men

Our Analysis and Test Results

Review by:
Ross Robinson & Jared Dean

Last Updated:
Sunday
December 13, 2015

Share:
The Le Chameau Vierzon is a rain boot with a very tall shaft and great traction, but lacks a good insulating liner (which may be a plus for you if you live in a warmer climate). Additionally, it fits very loosely and looks a little goofy as well.

Performance Comparison


The tall shaft of the Vierzon again prevails when wading into streams. Our feet are dry!
The tall shaft of the Vierzon again prevails when wading into streams. Our feet are dry!

Water Resistance


Of all the products we tested, this one has the second tallest shaft, measuring 16.75 inches from the bottom of the sole to the top of the shaft. This product has plenty of room between the shaft and the leg, which can be taken out by cinching down the buckles on the outside of the shaft for a perfect fit. Unfortunately, we discovered that the buckle easily loosens, causing the shaft to fully open as you're wearing it. The low quality plastic buckle also felt vulnerable to damage under hard knocks, which wasn't very impressive, especially considering this product's high price tag. If you want a tall product that offers great protection from the weather, check out the Arctic Sport. Another competitor, the Icebreaker, has a lace that cinches up the opening of the shaft, making it a great alternative to the Vierzon if you're worried about getting debris in your boot.

Reviewer Ross Robinson definitely did not enjoy testing this model in icy Minnesotan streams (although the tall shaft does provide plenty of water resistance). However  this lack of insulation does make them better suited for warmer weather conditions.
Reviewer Ross Robinson definitely did not enjoy testing this model in icy Minnesotan streams (although the tall shaft does provide plenty of water resistance). However, this lack of insulation does make them better suited for warmer weather conditions.

Comfort


This rain boot has a cushy insole that provides a decent amount of support, even though it lacks a supportive shank like the one on the The Original Muck Boot Company Chore Mid. Despite the soft and comfortable feeling on the bottoms of our testers' feet, this model fit fairly wide, leaving enough room that it felt as though our feet were sloshing about. We tried filling in the dead space with thicker socks and multiple layers of socks, to no avail. Our heels felt loose in the footbed and slid around enough that it felt as though we were wearing flip-flops, rather than a rain boot. The insole is also non-removable, which didn't seem like a big deal until we flooded the boot and found that the insole took a significant amount of time to fully dry.

For a more snug and comfortable fit, check out the Editors' Choice winning Kamik Icebreaker.

Traction


The tread of this rain boot has large and deep grooves that are aggressive enough to dig into soft surfaces like mud, sand, or loose dirt. Our testers even found that the tread has pretty good surface contact, making it work well on hard and slick surfaces like rock or pavement. In fact, it features one of the more versatile treads we tested. However, its looseness means that it's a little difficult to maintain a good footing, despite the aggressiveness of the tread. If you need a footbed with a snug fit and an aggressive yet versatile tread, check out the Icebreaker.

The tread is aggressive enough to tackle any situation in which you may find yourself. Although the boots work fine on hard surfaces  they really shine on rough off-road conditions.
The tread is aggressive enough to tackle any situation in which you may find yourself. Although the boots work fine on hard surfaces, they really shine on rough off-road conditions.

Warmth


This product has a Tartan anti-microbial lining that provides minimal warmth. When tested in a cold, Minnesotan winter stream, our feet became cold in under 30 seconds. Likewise, it didn't survive over 45 seconds in our ice water bath test. However, if you're active while wearing these rain boots, they will retain heat better than non-insulated, shorter boots. We believe they would be great through the fall, spring, and milder summer days, but dubious for winter time use.

Brrrr! The Vierzon let our feet get cold in just 26 seconds in the icy water of a Minneapolis stream.
Brrrr! The Vierzon let our feet get cold in just 26 seconds in the icy water of a Minneapolis stream.

Style


This model has the sleek look of an all-rubber rain boot and doesn't have the bulky appearance of a neoprene upper. However, it is more suited for practical use in rugged outdoor settings and isn't ideal if you are concerned about fashion. If you want a more stylish model, check out the Hunter Original Short, which is a mid-cut boot.

Side view of the Vierzon. This product scored poorly in our style metric. It kind of reminded us of the flimsy floppy rubber of an old school yellow kitchen glove.
Side view of the Vierzon. This product scored poorly in our style metric. It kind of reminded us of the flimsy floppy rubber of an old school yellow kitchen glove.

Ease of Use


At 4 pounds and 11 ounces, this product is among the heaviest in this review. Additionally, our testers found these boots a little difficult to get on and off. We believe this is due in part to the height of the shaft and the malleable rubber which fights you every way when trying to remove the boot. It also lacks any tabs to help assist getting the boot on. If you need a model that is easy to get on and off, check out the Bogs Ultra Mid Rain Boot, which has large handles punched out of the neoprene upper.

The height of the shaft is 17.5 inches  one of the tallest boots we tested  which added to the difficulty of putting it on and taking it off.
The height of the shaft is 17.5 inches, one of the tallest boots we tested, which added to the difficulty of putting it on and taking it off.

Fit


The Vierzon is one of the loosest fitting boots we tested. We tested a pair of size 11 boots on our size 11 feet. The main problem wasn't the fit from front to back, but that there was extra room on the sides and above the feet. Without half sizes being available, we didn't think our feet would be comfortable front to back in a whole size down. As a result, our testers found their feet swimming inside because of the dead space between the top of our feet and the boot, as well as along the sides. Thick socks would help take up the extra space, but there is still enough room that the boot just feels too loose. Additionally, the supple rubber twists and turns with every step, making it a little awkward when we tried wading through streams with rocky bottoms. It's not the best fitting model, and we think that it's a little more trouble than it's worth mostly because of its loose fit. If you want a product that fits more snugly, check out the Bogs Classic High - Men's or LaCrosse Hampton.

This boot has adjustable gussets to help customize the fit.
This boot has adjustable gussets to help customize the fit.

Best Applications


We think this model would be a great choice if you need a tall boot to wade through thick vegetation or streams. However, we think it is pricey and not very stylish if you need a simple rain boot to get you across town with dry feet. If you're looking for a simple, uninsulated rain boot at a much lower price, consider the Helly Hansen Midsund 2. Although lower performing than the Vierzon, it's also over $100 cheaper. The Vierzon could be used in hunting season if proper layering is observed, but otherwise it lacks significant insulation, meaning it's best used from mid-spring through mid-autumn.

This boot has a very thin liner  which means it doesn't retain heat too well. Though some may think this is a drawback  it makes the boots an ideal choice for warm weather use.
This boot has a very thin liner, which means it doesn't retain heat too well. Though some may think this is a drawback, it makes the boots an ideal choice for warm weather use.

Value


At $190, this is the most expensive product we tested. Our testers think it does a great job at keeping our feet dry and has one of the more versatile treads of all the boots we tested. Sadly, this piece is too loose and not warm enough that it could be worn year-round. As a result, we're not too sure it's worth the steep cost of $190.

Conclusion


The Le Chameau Vierzon offers great protection from the elements and has one of the most versatile treads of all the rain boots we tested. However, its very loose fit, lack of significant insulation, its weight, and mediocre comfort were detrimental to its overall score. Not to mention that it costs a whopping $190. In terms of height, the Arctic Sport is the most comparable to the Vierzon (though the Arctic Sport is far warmer), and it provides much more performance across the board.

This tall  uninsulated rain boot is a fine choice for mild weather.
This tall, uninsulated rain boot is a fine choice for mild weather.

Other Versions


Le Chameau Vierzonord Plus
Le Chameau Men's Vierzon Nord Plus Rubber Boot
  • Cold-weather version
  • 5-mm neoprene lining comfortable to -13 F degrees
  • Double layer of neoprene under sole of foot
  • $290
Ross Robinson & Jared Dean

You Might Also Like

OutdoorGearLab Member Reviews


Most recent review: December 13, 2015
Summary of All Ratings

OutdoorGearLab Editors' Rating:  
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 (3.0)
Average Customer Rating:  
 (0.0)
Rating Distribution
1 Total Ratings
5 star: 0%  (0)
4 star: 0%  (0)
3 star: 100%  (1)
2 star: 0%  (0)
1 star: 0%  (0)


Have you used this product?
Don't hold back. Share your viewpoint by posting a review with your thoughts...