The world's most in-depth and scientific reviews of outdoor gear

Bogs Urban Farmer Review

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Price:  $100 List | $74.96 at Amazon
Pros:  Decent style, good traction on smooth surfaces
Cons:  Uncomfortable around the ankles, difficult to get on, poor water protection
Manufacturer:   Bogs
By Ross Robinson ⋅ Senior Review Editor  ⋅  Dec 13, 2015
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46
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Water Resistance - 30% 3
  • Comfort - 25% 4
  • Traction - 15% 6
  • Warmth - 10% 6
  • Style - 10% 7
  • Ease of Use - 10% 5

Our Verdict

When the Bogs Urban Farmer Insulated arrived in our mailbox, we were anxious to put them on immediately and let the testing begin. This boot has a low shaft, an attractive style, and surprisingly good traction, along with a cushy EVA insole and a true-to-size fit in the heel and toebox. However, it was a fight to actually get them onto our feet, and shortly after doing so, the tight opening at the ankles made our feet feel un-"Comfortably Numb," much to our and, assumedly, Pink Floyd's chagrin. Furthermore, this boot's short height doesn't provide much water protection, which limits its versatility in varied weather conditions. Read on for an in-depth analysis of how this product fared in each metric.


Our Analysis and Test Results

The Bogs Urban Farmer Insulated, costing $100, is a short-cut rain boot that functions well for quick stints out in mild, wet weather. This relatively versatile boot isn't just for walking the dog in the rain…it also features a rigid internal steel shank that makes shoveling and other heavy-duty yard chores more comfortable. This extra feature, however, also makes it weigh more than any other short boot in this review. From the bottom of the sole to the lowest point of the shaft, it only measures 4.5 inches tall, which means it provides the least protection from rain compared to its competitors. Most importantly, this boot is not very comfortable over extended amounts of time due to its very tight fit around the ankles, which also makes it difficult to put on and take off.

Performance Comparison


The Urban Farmer scored well in the style metric  yet had significant drawbacks in several other important categories.
The Urban Farmer scored well in the style metric, yet had significant drawbacks in several other important categories.

Water Resistance


Being the shortest rain boot in this review at 4.5 inches tall, this runt scored very near the bottom of the pool in this metric. The Urban Farmer is too short to handle splashing through puddles or wading through creeks. Also, the bottom of your pants will probably get soggy in most wet conditions, because it's nearly impossible to tuck them into the boot. On a positive note, the snug opening around the ankle doesn't allow any rain, mud, or debris inside.

At four and a half inches  this model had the shortest shaft of any product in this review.
At four and a half inches, this model had the shortest shaft of any product in this review.

Comfort


This rain boot both impressed and distressed us in terms of comfort. It features a unique dual-density EVA insole that is rigid in the heel, yet cushioned in the ball and heel of the foot. This, coupled with the stiff steel shank inside the thick rubber outsole, makes for a pretty comfy footbed, even when walking on uneven surfaces like rocks and roots. However, enjoy that comfort while it lasts! The elastic opening that fits around the ankle has a very small circumference (just 11 inches). It squeezed our ankles so tight, that our reviewers' feet went numb and tingly after wearing them for only 15-20 minutes. For a supremely comfortable short boot, check out the award winning LaCrosse Hampton.

The small circumference of the opening at the top of the shaft was as tight as our first. The elastic around the top squeezed our ankles when we wore them  creating an uncomfortable experience.
The small circumference of the opening at the top of the shaft was as tight as our first. The elastic around the top squeezed our ankles when we wore them, creating an uncomfortable experience.

Traction


This model scored decently in this metric.The less aggressive tread provides lots of surface area contact with the ground, which is great in urban environments like wet pavement. Although it doesn't have deep lugs like the heavier duty Bogs Classic High - Men's or The Original Muck Boot Company Chore Mid, the wavy and textured tread fared well on the slick rocks we tested them on in creeks, as well as muddy trails.

The design of the tread of the Urban Farmer gave us pretty good purchase on a variety of surfaces. However  the rigid steel shank insert dulled the sensitivity of our feet  which made it less effective on uneven terrain.
The design of the tread of the Urban Farmer gave us pretty good purchase on a variety of surfaces. However, the rigid steel shank insert dulled the sensitivity of our feet, which made it less effective on uneven terrain.

Warmth


The Urban Farmer showed some versatility in this metric. With 4mm Neo-Tech insulation, this boot can handle cool weather fairly well. Of the ankle-cut boots in this review, it kept our toes warm the longest when submerged in ice cold water. Largely due to its short height, our reviewers also found it to be suitable on warmer days in the spring and fall. We wouldn't recommend it on hot and rainy summer days, but you will probably want another type of shoes in that situation anyhow. If you need a boot that can handle much colder temperatures, check out our champs of the chill, the Kamik Icebreaker or The Original Muck Boot Company Arctic Sport - Men's.

Ross Robinson was eager to escape the winter stream while wearing this model.
Ross Robinson was eager to escape the winter stream while wearing this model.

Style


This metric is where this rain boot scored its highest points. Its short height allows it to hide beneath the bottom of your pants, which makes it hard to notice that you're wearing a rain boot at all. The matte finish also keeps it from sticking out. Though it scored well, it didn't get as many points as the LaCrosse Hampton or the Tretorn Strala, which are both more narrow and sleek.

The Urban Farmer doesn't draw attention to itself under the cuffs of your pants for casual use around town.
The Urban Farmer doesn't draw attention to itself under the cuffs of your pants for casual use around town.

Ease of Use


This product didn't soar above the competition in this category for two reasons. First, although lightweight compared to most of the tall-shafted models, it was the heaviest of the short boots, and felt clunky underfoot in comparison. Second, its small circumference makes pulling the boots on a serious undertaking, despite the added features of the pull-on tabs. Ridges on the back of the heels makes removing the boots a decidedly easier task, however.

Don't expect to jump into this model quickly. It requires sitting down and pulling hard on the loops to enlarge the opening enough to slide your foot inside.
Don't expect to jump into this model quickly. It requires sitting down and pulling hard on the loops to enlarge the opening enough to slide your foot inside.

Fit


This is one of the only boots in this review that actually felt true-to-size. The size 11 fit great on a size 11 foot. Our heels stayed securely in its place, and our toes had just enough wiggle room in the toe box. However, keep in mind that the opening is very tight (11 inches) and has a tendency to squeeze the ankles uncomfortably.

The Urban Farmer fit our feet well  but the death grip around our ankles created by its small circumference was far from pleasant.
The Urban Farmer fit our feet well, but the death grip around our ankles created by its small circumference was far from pleasant.

Best Application


We found the best application for the Urban Farmer to be short trips out in wet weather, such as walking our pets or running to the grocery store. The stiff outsoles and decent traction makes them suitable for most chores in muddy backyards. However, we don't recommend relying on them all day, as they will quickly become uncomfortable.

Here's an example of when rain boots are NOT the most appropriate footwear: bouldering along the St. Croix River.
Here's an example of when rain boots are NOT the most appropriate footwear: bouldering along the St. Croix River.

Value


This rain boot, retailing at $100, was the fourth least expensive rain boot in this review. Yet, for the same price, the LaCrosse Hampton is a similar style of boot that offers much better performance. Therefore, we don't think the Urban Farmer is a great value.

Stylish looks weren't enough for us to find this product very valuable  especially in comparison to other models in this review.
Stylish looks weren't enough for us to find this product very valuable, especially in comparison to other models in this review.

Conclusion


Throughout our testing, we experienced several things we liked about the Bogs Urban Farmer, such as its comfortable footbed, versatility in various temperatures, and style. However, the drawbacks of being too tight around the ankles, poor water resistance, and difficulty in using them were too great to be overlooked, and therefore limit the overall utility and value of this product significantly.

For running in and out of the house on soggy days  these boots are a decent option. Here  the tread of the Urban Farmer grabs on to wet wooden steps well.
For running in and out of the house on soggy days, these boots are a decent option. Here, the tread of the Urban Farmer grabs on to wet wooden steps well.


Ross Robinson