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The North Face Dryzzle Futurelight Review

Maintains a steady level of breathability regardless of activity level and nails a sweet spot of weight and durability
The North Face Dryzzle Futurelight
Credit: Backcountry
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Price:  $230 List | $171.93 at REI
Compare prices at 2 resellers
Pros:  Breathability, comfortable feeling internal fabric, stretchy material allows for good mobility, respectable weight and packed size
Cons:  Pockets pinch under a waist belt or harness, hood doesn't fit over a helmet, slightly on the more expensive side, weather resistance
Manufacturer:   The North Face
By Ian Nicholson ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  May 6, 2020
Our Editors independently research, test, and rate the best products. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Learn more
66
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#10 of 12
  • Water Resistance - 30% 6.0
  • Breathability & Venting - 25% 7.0
  • Comfort & Mobility - 18% 7.0
  • Weight - 15% 6.0
  • Durability - 5% 8.0
  • Packed Size - 7% 7.0

Our Verdict

The North Face Dryzzle FutureLight is a versatile 3-layer jacket, which uses TNF's new FutureLight air-permeable fabric. The Dryzzle strikes a nice balance of weight and toughness and is light enough for most backpackers and hikers looking for an emergency layer. It's also tough enough for folks who are hard on their gear or need it for more rugged applications. People will appreciate TNF's new FutureLight air-permeable fabric for a variety of applications, as it doesn't require heat build up inside for it to maximize breathability. It also maintains an even level of moisture movement, even if you have cooled off or are just standing around.

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Awards  Editors' Choice Award Best Buy Award Top Pick Award  
Price $171.93 at REI
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Pros Breathability, comfortable feeling internal fabric, stretchy material allows for good mobility, respectable weight and packed sizeSuper light, ultra compact, trim fit, excellent breathability, weather protection compared to others in its weight class, stuffs into a pocket, hood moves very well with its userIncredible price, Gore-Tex, solid weather protection, excellent hood design, weight and packed volumeUnmatched stretch, mobility, freedom-of-movement, good breathabilityBetter breathability than others in its price range, decent ventilation, roll away hood, nice pit zips, affordable
Cons Pockets pinch under a waist belt or harness, hood doesn't fit over a helmet, slightly on the more expensive side, weather resistanceAverage weather protection overall, no pockets, no clip in point on stuff sack, elastic wrist loops are basic, trim/athletic cut doesn't facilitate layeringWets out quicker than other Gore-Tex models, two layer design isn't as long-lasting, clammy interiorAverage weather protection, you might find the slim fit doesn't accommodate layeringNo chest pocket, not quite as breathable as models that use non-coated membrane
Bottom Line Maintains a steady level of breathability regardless of activity level and nails a sweet spot of weight and durabilityIf you participate in activities where every ounce matters and you also need excellent weather protection and breathability, few can match this model for its weightOne of the best values you can get for a piece of rain gear, this Gore-Tex model is packed full of functional featuresThe stretchiest rain jacket we have ever tested, it provides unmatched freedom of movement and great breathability, making it ideal for cool weather activitiesA great jacket that offers above-average breathability, with an excellent price tag
Rating Categories The North Face Dryz... The North Face Flig... REI Co-op XeroDry GTX Rab Kinetic 2.0 Marmot PreCip Eco
Water Resistance (30%)
6.0
7.0
8.0
6.0
7.0
Breathability & Venting (25%)
7.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
6.0
Comfort & Mobility (18%)
7.0
8.0
7.0
10.0
7.0
Weight (15%)
6.0
9.0
6.0
6.0
5.0
Durability (5%)
8.0
5.0
6.0
8.0
6.0
Packed Size (7%)
7.0
8.0
7.0
7.0
7.0
Specs The North Face Dryz... The North Face Flig... REI Co-op XeroDry GTX Rab Kinetic 2.0 Marmot PreCip Eco
Measured Weight (Medium) 12 oz 7.25 oz 12.5 oz 12 oz 13.5 oz
Waterproof Fabric Material 3-layer Futurelight 20D FutureLight 3L 2-layer GORE-TEX Paclite Proflex NanoPro
Face Fabric and Layer Construction Recycled polyester 100% recycled polyester, DWR finish Polyester 3-layer, 100% recycled polyester 100% nylon ripstop
Pockets 2 zippered hand, 1 zippered chest 1 interior 2 hand 2 hand 2 zip hand pockets
Are Lower Pockets Hipbelt Friendly? No Yes No Yes No
Pit Zips No No No No Yes
Helmet Compatible Hood (not only fits but not too tight) Yes No No Yes Yes
Stows Into Pocket? Yes Yes No Yes Yes

Our Analysis and Test Results

The Dryzzle works well for a wide range of uses, from activities where weight and packed volume are a priority, like hiking and backpacking, to adventures where a little more durability is required, such as mountaineering. It's also stylish enough for around-town use. Its air-permeable FutureLight fabric provides excellent breathability, and its 3-layer construction facilitates long-lasting storm protection. Simply put, this is a do-everything rain jacket and it has an excellent combination of weight, stormworthiness, and durability, which will satisfy he majority of outdoor enthusiasts.

Performance Comparison


The North Face Dryzzle Futurelight rain jacket - this model proved to be a solid all-arounder. it struck a nice...
This model proved to be a solid all-arounder. It struck a nice balance of weather resistance, breathability, and weight to keep most outdoor-oriented people happy while still offering enough style to wear to the farmers market on a rainy Sunday.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Water Resistance


The Dryzzle uses The North Face FutureLight fabric for its storm protection. Futurelight is a polyester-based air-permeable material that is similar in design and construction to models like the Outdoor Research Interstellar and the Rab Kinetic Plus.

The North Face Dryzzle Futurelight rain jacket - this model offered solid (though not exceptional) weather...
This model offered solid (though not exceptional) weather resistance. While we didn't get a lot of water through the fabric of the jacket, we were disappointed in how quickly its DWR wore off. Even after just a few trips, the exterior of the jacket absorbed more water than most, making us feel cold and damp. This photo was from day one, pulling it out of the plastic with water sitting on it for less than 1 minute.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

In our real-world use backpacking in Washington's Olympic National Park and during our side-by-side shower and garden hose tests, this jacket performed decently. The hood seals out the elements, and and its main front zipper offers a large internal storm flap which helped this model do well in our weather resistance tests. While not quite in our highest tier, it offered more than enough weather resistance to keep most hikers, backpackers, and mountaineers, happy and dry.

The North Face Dryzzle Futurelight rain jacket - while not helmet-compatible, this contender offered a nice deep hood...
While not helmet-compatible, this contender offered a nice deep hood which helped keep the rain off our faces.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

It wouldn't be our first choice if we knew we were going to have to do a lot of hanging around in the rain, not moving where its air permeability wouldn't allow this jacket to trap as much heat, which would leave us feeling cold.

The North Face Dryzzle Futurelight rain jacket - the dryzzle uses the north face's futurelite air-permeable fabric...
The Dryzzle uses The North Face's Futurelite air-permeable fabric, which provided above-average breathability.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Breathability & Venting


The FutureLight membrane is air permeable and similar in performance to other proprietary air permeable materials. The fact that FutureLight is air permeable means that air is always able to pass through the fabric, offering a relatively "steady" rate of breathability — regardless of the user's activity.

Most fabrics from Gore-Tex or eVent require a pressure difference created by building heat on the inside of the jacket, which in turn creates a pressure difference as it is warmer on the inside of the jacket than the air outside. Depending on how big of a temperature difference there is, these jackets can breathe better or worse than air-permeable ones.

The best part about air-permeable fabrics like FutureLight is that they continue to breathe even before you get hot or as you slow down and have already cooled off. The breathability rates presented by The North Face and other manufacturers is a little misleading, as they offer a static level of breathability and most ePTFE fabrics (like Gore-Tex) have a very dynamic level of breathability depending on air temperature, humidity, and user-created heat. Thus, just looking at numbers can be misleading. It is worth noting that the current FutureLight version of this jacket has no pit-zips like the previous Gore-Tex version.

This model icontinues to breathe, regardless of heat build up. It's an excellent option for more aerobic activities like hiking or backpacking but also for less aerobic ones such as simply walking the dog. If breathability is a priority for you, you'll want to give this jacket a second look.

The North Face Dryzzle Futurelight rain jacket - when we reached forward this model pulled back a little from our...
When we reached forward this model pulled back a little from our wrists, but its stretchy fabric helped increase mobility and freedom of movement.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Comfort & Mobility


All of our testers loved the interior Tricot lining, which coupled with its air-permeable FutureLight membrane, meant we didn't feel clammy. The mobility and freedom of movement were excellent, and a significant improvement over the previous version.

The North Face Dryzzle Futurelight rain jacket - we got more movement when we reached up. the dryzzle's hem would...
We got more movement when we reached up. The Dryzzle's hem would raise slightly more than average.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

When we lift our arms over our head, the hem hardly moves, and when we reach forward or upward, the sleeves barely pull back from our wrists. We loved the cut, with its mobility-focused design, which, when coupled with its stretchy construction, put it near the top-tier from a freedom of movement standpoint. These attributes help this jacket excel for activities where good mobility is important, but the user is unable or unwilling to give up much in the way of stormworthiness.

The North Face Dryzzle Futurelight rain jacket - we did like how well this model's hood cinched up around our heads...
We did like how well this model's hood cinched up around our heads, sealing out the elements and accommodating a large variety of headwear and head sizes.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Hood Design

The Dryzzle's hood was fantastic with a baseball cap, beanie, or only your head. It provided the wearer storm protection, sealing out the elements, and kept our testers dry in real-world uses and an array of side-by-side comparisons. This contender offers excellent features that help keep it snug around the wearer's head without limiting any peripheral vision. The only downside? The Dryzzle's hood doesn't fit over a climbing or bike helmet very well; it does technically fit, but it's much tight, and it does affect the wearer's comfort and peripheral vision.

The North Face Dryzzle Futurelight rain jacket - the dryzzle was also among the best at maintaining peripheral...
The Dryzzle was also among the best at maintaining peripheral vision. When cinched, the hood would move with our heads, allowing us look side to side without our vision becoming obstructed.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Pocket Design

The Dryzzle features two handwarmer-style pockets and one chest Napoleon style pocket. The lower pockets are a nice place to put your hands but are low enough that they get covered up by a backpack wais -belt or climbing harness, making them hard to access. Not only that, but the zippers are on the smaller side and the hefty storm flap feels bulky under a waist belt.

The North Face Dryzzle Futurelight rain jacket - the nepolean-style chest pocket was big enough to accommodate even...
The Nepolean-style chest pocket was big enough to accommodate even larger smartphones.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

If you're aiming to do a lot of backpacking or other trips where you might be carrying a pack, we'd recommend the Arc'teryx Zeta SL, REI Drypoint GTX, or Outdoor Research Interstellar — which all have more pack-friendly pockets.

The North Face Dryzzle Futurelight rain jacket - the handwarmer pockets, while cozy, are positioned low on the jacket...
The handwarmer pockets, while cozy, are positioned low on the jacket and were pretty much useless with a pack or harness on.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Weight


At 12 ounces, this jacket is in the middle of the road from a weight perspective, but it should be noted that most of the products we selected are on the lighter end of the spectrum. We were impressed by this product's weight, given how durable it is, and its balance of weight and durability make it an excellent contender as an all-around jacket. It's light enough to throw in the bottom of your pack for shorter day hikes but tough enough for a weeklong backpacking trip, even if it rains all week.

Durability


This model uses a 35D x 20D recycled polyester face fabric, which is thicker and more tear-resistant than average. It also uses a 3-layer construction, meaning, generally speaking, the internal waterproof membrane will be better protected on the inside from sweat and grim than a 2.5 layer jacket (and thus, will hold its water-resistance longer). We were impressed by the durability of the new Dryzzle Futurelight and think it's plenty tough enough for backpacking and hiking use.

The North Face Dryzzle Futurelight rain jacket - this jacket is one of the largest in our review when packed down...
This jacket is one of the largest in our review when packed down, but it still packs down small enough for most day hikes or backpacking trips. Here it is rolled up inside its hood next to a 1-liter Nalgene.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Packed Size


The Dryzzle packs down reasonably small and offers better packability than most beefy 3-layer hardshell jackets. While it is easy to buy a jacket that packs down smaller, the majority won't be as versatile. It's small enough to please most backpackers, mountaineers, and day hikers as long as they know they get a little more versatility over buying a more compressible one. The Dryzzle doesn't compress into either of its pockets, unlike several other similar models that we reviewed.

The North Face Dryzzle Futurelight rain jacket - pretty average in price among the higher-end air-permeable jackets...
Pretty average in price among the higher-end air-permeable jackets, the Dryzzle hits a sweet spot for style and outdoor function. This jacket is great for folks who need something to walk the dog in but also to occasionally use for hiking, backpacking, or downhill ski trips.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Value


Its 3-layer construction and tough 35D face fabric mean it is more long-lasting, but as a result, it only offers average weight and packed size. We do think this model strikes a nice balance of weight and durability, helping it to perform well for a wide range of applications.

The North Face Dryzzle Futurelight rain jacket - the dryzzle is a great all-arounder. while it's not necessarily the...
The Dryzzle is a great all-arounder. While it's not necessarily the absolute best at anything, this jacket does well for most things and will keep most outdoor enthusiasts happy whether out on a rainy hike or a damp visit to their local farmers market.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Conclusion


The North Face Dryzzle Futurelight is a stormworthy all-arounder. While not necessarily the absolute best at anything, it's well rounded for most outdoor enthusiasts. It's light enough to disappear in your pack on a day hike but durable, breathable, and weather-resistant enough for a soggy weeklong backpacking trip where it might rain every day. The only thing outdoor-oriented folks might not love about it is its pockets, which are nearly impossible to access with a pack or harness on. If you're looking for a rain jacket for around town, thie handwarmer pockets are ideally placed, and it will get the job done.

Ian Nicholson
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