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Marmot PreCip Eco Review

A great jacket that offers above-average breathability, with an excellent price tag
Marmot PreCip Eco
Photo: Marmot
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Price:  $100 List | $59.97 at Backcountry
Compare prices at 2 resellers
Pros:  Better breathability than others in its price range, decent ventilation, roll away hood, nice pit zips, affordable
Cons:  No chest pocket, not quite as breathable as models that use non-coated membrane
Manufacturer:   Marmot
By Ian Nicholson ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  May 5, 2020
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66
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#11 of 13
  • Water Resistance - 30% 7
  • Breathability & Venting - 25% 6
  • Comfort & Mobility - 18% 7
  • Weight - 15% 6
  • Durability - 5% 6
  • Packed Size - 7% 7

Our Verdict

The Marmot PreCip Eco Jacket is a time tested piece of weather protection that has been produced for over 20 years. It still packs quite a punch for its price tag. It's light enough to carry on extended backpacking and climbing trips, and it's sufficiently ventilated for high energy activities, especially as a price-pointed model. The hood tucks away in the event you'd like to wear a hat or if you're using your jacket around town, and the large hand pockets can hold keys, phone, and gloves with no problem. This model is a former winner of our Best Buy Award, and while it no longer has that award, it remains an excellent rain shell for the price.

Compare to Similar Products

 
Marmot PreCip Eco
This Product
Marmot PreCip Eco
Awards  Editors' Choice Award  Best Buy Award  
Price $59.97 at Backcountry
Compare at 2 sellers
Check Price at REI
Compare at 2 sellers
$159 List
Check Price at REI
Check Price at REI
Compare at 2 sellers
Check Price at REI
Compare at 3 sellers
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Star Rating
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Pros Better breathability than others in its price range, decent ventilation, roll away hood, nice pit zips, affordableTop-tier storm-worthiness, mobility and range of motion, hood design, long-lasting DWR, exceptional breathability, harness and hip-belt friendly pocketsIncredible price, Gore-Tex, solid weather protection, excellent hood design, weight and packed volumeVersatile, durable, long lasting DWR, good stormworthiness, minimal clammy feelComfortable, affordable, athletic fit, good wrist cuffs
Cons No chest pocket, not quite as breathable as models that use non-coated membraneNo ventilation options, expensive, no easy way to clip to a harnessWets out quicker than other Gore-Tex models, two layer design isn't as long-lasting, clammy interiorHeavy, average packed size, mobility, and freedom of movementBulky, warm, limited hood adjustment
Bottom Line A great jacket that offers above-average breathability, with an excellent price tagThis stormworthy and function focused model is exceptionally versatile, offering some of the best performance in our reviewOne of the best values you can get for a piece of rain gear, this Gore-Tex model is packed full of functional featuresA durable jacket with function focused design that will keep most satisfied, without putting a hole in your walletAn excellent price, but it doesn't offer nearly as many outdoor activity oriented features as other models we review
Rating Categories Marmot PreCip Eco Arc'teryx Zeta SL REI Co-op XeroDry GTX Patagonia Torrentsh... Columbia Watertight II
Water Resistance (30%)
7.0
9.0
8.0
8.0
6.0
Breathability & Venting (25%)
6.0
8.0
8.0
6.0
3.0
Comfort & Mobility (18%)
7.0
8.0
7.0
8.0
5.0
Weight (15%)
6.0
7.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
Durability (5%)
6.0
8.0
6.0
8.0
5.0
Packed Size (7%)
7.0
7.0
7.0
7.0
7.0
Specs Marmot PreCip Eco Arc'teryx Zeta SL REI Co-op XeroDry GTX Patagonia Torrentsh... Columbia Watertight II
Measured Weight (Medium) 13.5 oz 10.9 oz 12.5 oz 14 oz 13.5 oz
Waterproof Fabric Material NanoPro 2-layer Gore-Tex Paclite Plus waterproof breathable laminate 2-layer GORE-TEX Paclite 3-layer H2No Performance Standard shell 2-Layer Omni-Tech w/ Mesh Liner
Face Fabric and Layer Construction 100% nylon ripstop 40-denier ripstop (N40r) Gore-Tex Paclite Plus Polyester 350-denier 100% recycled nylon, polycarbonate PU membrane, tricot backer Nylon w/ coated waterproof breathable insert and hanging mesh protective liner
Pockets 2 zip hand pockets 2 hand pockets 2 hand 2 zippered hand pockets 2 hand pockets
Are lower pockets hipbelt friendly No Yes No No No
Pit Zips Yes Yes No Yes No
Helmet Compatible Hood (not only fits but not too tight) Yes No No No No
Stows Into Pocket? Yes No No Yes Yes

Our Analysis and Test Results

A versatile 2.5 layer shell with well-designed features and an excellent price tag make the Marmot Precip Eco one of the best values on the market. Marmot's proprietary NanoPro technology breathes respectably well for the cost. Our testing team also appreciated several of its useful features, like its stow pocket with a ready-to-clip loop, pit zips, cuffs, and hood that outperforms several more expensive jackets. While there are certainly better-performing models on the market, you have to spend more money to get more performance and few models can match this one for its performance to cost ratio. The Eco will do everything from backpacking to rainy walks in the park — without breaking the bank.

Performance Comparison


It's hard to buy a better jacket for a lower price. While you can...
It's hard to buy a better jacket for a lower price. While you can spend more money and get a higher-performing model, the Precip Eco offers plenty of functionality for the price.
Photo: Ian Nicholson

Water Resistance


Whether out walking the dog or hanging out during a damp camping trip to the coast, this jacket gets the job done, even in the pouring rain. Using Marmot's proprietary NanoPro waterproof coating, the hood seals well around the face, as do the elastic cinches found on each side of the wearer's face.

This design is more comfortable across the brow and equally stable at sealing out blowing rain. The wrist cuffs also seal nicely with adjustable Velcro tabs; a feature some folks consider mandatory in their rain jacket. The Precip Eco will keep your waist covered when reaching with your arms overhead. It beads water well, and the DWR proved durable during our months of testing. A quick wash and dry restored it nicely after a few months of testing.

The PreCip uses Marmot's proprietary NanoPro waterproof breathable...
The PreCip uses Marmot's proprietary NanoPro waterproof breathable fabric. It kept our testing team dry both in real-world and side-by-side shower comparisons, and we are impressed with its DWR.
Photo: Ian Nicholson

Breathability & Ventilation


The PreCip Eco has a sweet combination of ventilation features, which help pass moisture, keeping the wearer cool. The fabric used in the PreCip breathes better than most models in its price range. Understandably so, this jacket does not breathe as well as the higher-end models, which offer non-coated membranes and non-proprietary fabrics. Is this worth the price difference? Depends on what you'll be using it for. While this is one of the more significant downsides of the PreCip, it's still constructed of a decently breathable fabric when it comes down to it.

The main ventilation features include two large pit zips, which are relatively easy to operate with one hand. The lower primary central hand pockets are large and mesh-lined to promote airflow when left open. Mesh-lined pockets, in contrast to the waterproof pockets common to hardshell jackets, provide additional ventilation for rain jackets.

This model didn't offer anything exceptional in regards to...
This model didn't offer anything exceptional in regards to breathability but it did perform better than nearly all the other models in its price range. Larger than average pit zips help this model dump heat and moisture. The only thing we didn't love about it (which was also true with most budget models) was it felt a little clammier than higher-end models.
Photo: Ian Nicholson

In theory, folks are more likely to use rain jackets in warmer temperatures when ventilation is vital (because if it is super cold you will likely want everything to be zipped up and won't want to "dump" heat), and more likely to use hardshells in cold and snowy conditions, when waterproof pockets are ideal. Even the cuffs have enough room to ventilate adequately at the wrist. You can cinch them closed if it is raining; otherwise, leave them open and loose to promote airflow.

The PreCip offers adequate mobility and range of motion.
The PreCip offers adequate mobility and range of motion.
Photo: Ian Nicholson

Comfort & Mobility


The PreCip Eco earns a reasonably high score in this metric, thanks to its easy-to-use features and decent mobility. Even with the added bulk of pit zips and pockets, this jacket is surprisingly mobile and comfortable while on the move.

The hood rolls up and easily stows into the collar (AKA underneath, not just rolled up) for rain hat wearers or folks who want to tuck it out of the way. The elastic cord locks at the hood and the bottom hem and are simple and easy to use. Rather than have strings on tiny metal zipper pulls, this jacket uses zippers with reasonably large metal pulls. This may be the most natural jacket to operate with light gloves on, as the big, metal pulls are easy to grab.

The primary reason this model didn't score better in our mobility...
The primary reason this model didn't score better in our mobility tests is it tends to pull back from our wrists while reaching further than other products we tested. This is hardly a dealbreaker, but should certainly be a consideration for folks with longer arms.
Photo: Ian Nicholson

The PreCip moves well during active use. Marmot calls its arm and shoulder design "Angel-Wing Movement." This jacket stays put at the waist and torso, even as you do your thing overhead with your arms. The hood mobility is good, and it's another comfortable rain jacket that can be worn with a baseball cap.

This jacket weighs about 13 ounces and is more than light enough for...
This jacket weighs about 13 ounces and is more than light enough for most hiking, backpacking, or mountaineering trips.
Photo: Ian Nicholson

Weight


This rain jacket weighed in at right around 13.5 ounces, which is pretty average amongst our fleet. While not nearly as light as the Outdoor Research Helium Rain (6.5 oz), roughly half the weight and half the packed size of the PreCip, this model is hardly heavy and is still light enough for the majority of outdoor enthusiasts to be happy with.

The PreCip offers average durability but is plenty tough enough for...
The PreCip offers average durability but is plenty tough enough for backpacking, hiking, or even occasional downhill skiing use.
Photo: Ian Nicholson

Durability


Marmot upgraded the external fabric (commonly called face fabric) that they used in this jacket for 2019. It now uses recycled ripstop nylon for the face fabric, which is subtlely tougher than the previous model. Its zippers and Velcro closures are high quality and in line with other similarly priced models as far as longevity and tear resistance. For folks who feel they are hard on their gear but still don't want to break the bank, we found the Patagonia Torrentshell held up slightly better during more abrasive activities.

The PreCip stows away into one of its handwarmer pockets and...
The PreCip stows away into one of its handwarmer pockets and compresses down smaller than many similarly priced jackets.
Photo: Ian Nicholson

Packed Size


This model compresses fairly well and stuffs into its left-hand pocket for easy packing. It nearly disappears in the bottom of a daypack, should you want to be prepared for unexpected afternoon thunderstorms. When stuffed, a securely sewn-in webbing carabiner clip loop gives you carrying options.

The hood cinches down relatively well to help keep the water out...
The hood cinches down relatively well to help keep the water out, but it wasn't the best at maintaining excellent peripheral vision.
Photo: Ian Nicholson

Features


The hood on this rain jacket has two elastic cord adjustments around the face, with the cord locks located on the inside (next to your face). This design is more difficult to adjust when the collar is zipped up completely but is more waterproof.

The hood tucks into a collar rather than just rolling up. For folks...
The hood tucks into a collar rather than just rolling up. For folks interested in a roll-away hood, the Precip Eco's boasts the nicest in the sub 150 arena.
Photo: Ian Nicholson

A Velcro tab on the back of the hood provides adjustment to raise or lower the hood's brim on your brow; this Velcro tab performs double duty and secures the hood so it can roll away into the collar. If you like to wear a rain hat, tucking the hood away is a nice feature, and it's helpful that the hood doesn't just roll away - it tucks into a sleeve in the collar.

The Precip Eco uses two Velcro closures on its wrists, which help...
The Precip Eco uses two Velcro closures on its wrists, which help minimize bulk and the amount of water that might find its way into your jacket.
Photo: Ian Nicholson

This jacket has pit zips with traditional zippers, which are protected by an exterior fabric rain flap; fabric storm flaps protect two mesh-lined hand pockets with traditional zippers. The zipper pulls are at the top when closed, allowing some access to the pocket, even when partially blocked by the waist belt of your backpack. The pockets are mesh pouches, and the jacket stuffs into one, which has a clip-in loop. The wrist cuffs have a Velcro tab adjustment and the elastic hem cinch, and with one cord lock located on the right side, it is easy to adjust.

This model didn't cinch around our heads as well as others. Instead...
This model didn't cinch around our heads as well as others. Instead of a drawcord to pull the sides of the hood together from the back, it uses a small piece of Velcro. It does offer two drawcords in the front, but we didn't find this design to work quite as well as others.
Photo: Ian Nicholson

Value


The Precip Eco packs in a lot of performance for the price and has won our Best Buy Award many times over the years. It remains a powerful contender and nearly took it home again. Compared to our Best Buy Award Winner, the Patagonia Torrentshell 3L, the Precip Eco is less expensive, but the Torrentshell proved more durable, offered better mobility, was more stormworthy, and offered longer lasting weather resistance.

The Marmot PreCip proved to be the most breathable model in our...
The Marmot PreCip proved to be the most breathable model in our review making it perfect for backpacking, hiking, or any other more aerobic activity that you still need rain protection at a reasonable price.
Photo: Ian Nicholson

Conclusion


This affordable and well-featured jacket is an easy choice if you want a do-it-all jacket at a great price. It will keep you dry around town or on a backpacking trip, and its NanoPro coating technology breathes quite well, especially when its wallet-friendly price tag is taken into account.

The PreCip's pockets are a pleasant place to put your hands when...
The PreCip's pockets are a pleasant place to put your hands when it's cold, as the low-profile zippers are much more comfortable than several other options which featured larger zippers. However, your hands may become pinched under a backpack's waist belt or a climbing harness.
Photo: Ian Nicholson

Ian Nicholson