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Asolo Eiger GV Review

This lightweight boot is made for mixed climbing and high-speed mountaineering.
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Price:  $620 List | $619.95 at Backcountry
Compare prices at 2 resellers
Pros:  Light, climbs mixed and rock terrain well
Cons:  Not super warm, overly complicated lacing
Manufacturer:   Asolo
By Ian McEleney ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Apr 2, 2019
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64
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#4 of 7
  • Weight - 20% 9
  • Warmth - 15% 4
  • Water Resistance - 20% 5
  • Climbing - 25% 7
  • Hiking - 10% 7
  • Lacing - 10% 5

Our Verdict

The Asolo Eiger GV is a well-built boot that's optimized to perform for mixed climbing, dry tooling, and climbing rock without crampons. Good ankle flex and a rigid sole help with this. It's quite light and hikes reasonably well. It gets the job done on steep ice, without knocking our socks off.

We found the boot closure system to be overly complicated, and it's not as warm as some of the other options that only weigh a bit more. Climbers looking for something simpler but also light should check out the Best Buy Award winning La Sportiva Trango Tower Extreme GTX.


Compare to Similar Products

Our Analysis and Test Results

The Asolo Eiger GV is an excellent boot for light and fast climbing, especially if that climbing isn't incredibly cold and involves a fair amount of rock. All of our tester boots are size 43, except for this one and the Arc'teryx Acrux AR. These boots don't come in 43 but do come in 43 1/3. The Acrux fit us in that size, but the Eiger GV was way too big. We tried again in 42.5, which worked, barely, but was still pretty big. Climbers should not expect to fit their normal size in this boot. Plan to try it on.

Performance Comparison


Casting off on lead with the Eiger GV.
Casting off on lead with the Eiger GV.

Weight


The Eiger GV checks in at a bantamweight 1 pound 13.8 ounces (845g). Our testers attribute this to its mostly fabric construction and slightly thinner sole when compared to the rest of the boots in our review.

This is one of lightest boots in our review.
This is one of lightest boots in our review.

The La Sportiva Trango Tower Extreme GTX is only 0.2 ounces (10g) lighter, so they're essentially tied for lightest boot in the test. Remember that the weight is for only one boot (1/2 of a pair).

Warmth


Our testing team had a hard time deciding which boot was less warm, the Eiger GV or the Trango Tower Extreme. Both boots are fairly thin and low cut. Ultimately we picked the Eiger GV as slightly warmer because of its cuff gaiter, lace cover, and additional tongue padding (which is not removable).

When the weather is moving in we'd rather have a warmer boot on. Time to bail.
When the weather is moving in we'd rather have a warmer boot on. Time to bail.

Less insulation means that this boot is more pleasant to wear in the summer. Though it's warm enough to perform on many winter days, mountaineers venturing out on the coldest of the cold (or those who can't keep their feet warm) will want to choose something warmer. The La Sportiva G5 and Scarpa Phantom Tech are both quite a bit warmer but only weigh a couple of ounces more per boot.

Water Resistance


The Eiger GV is about average when it comes to water resistance. The cuff gaiter does a great job of keeping snow out. The tongue cover adds a waterproof layer over the already waterproof upper of the boot. We're still not totally sure what this zippered flap of fabric is for, but it did trap moisture between it and the normal upper of the boot.

The "water line" of the Eiger GV is the top of the cuff (black leather) not the gaiter above that.
The "water line" of the Eiger GV is the top of the cuff (black leather) not the gaiter above that.

Like the Scarpa Mont Blanc Pro the "water line" of this boot sneaks up on you. Though the cuff gaiter keeps snow out just fine, it's not waterproof, so the low point where water can come in over the top is about 7 inches off the ground, at the back of the cuff.

Climbing


When it comes to climbing, dry tooling, mixed climbing, and bare rock climbing are this boot's forte. Even when laced snugly the cuff allows for a good range of motion in our ankles. We also appreciated this attribute for French technique. The sole is relatively thin and rigid, without too much rocker. It seemed to our testers that this allowed for precise placement of both frontpoints and boot rubber.

The more rock we could incorporate into our ice climbing the better this boot performed.
The more rock we could incorporate into our ice climbing the better this boot performed.

When it came to steep ice, these boots perform satisfactorily, but every boot in our review does at least that well. The Eiger GV's ho-hum ice climbing performance, combined with great work on mixed and rock terrain, add up to an above average overall score for climbing.

Lacing


Our testers were not big fans of the lacing system on the Eiger GV. The cuff gaiter has to be done up before the lacing is completed. Not a big deal, but most of our testers got the order wrong most of the time. Then there's the zippered flap that covers the laces. It seems unnecessary. One thing we did like is the big pull loop on the back of the boot. Not only does it help with getting your foot in there, but it also makes a convenient point to hang to boots to dry at home, or out of the way in a tent.

We felt this zippered flap added unnecessary weight to the boot and an unnecessary lacing step.
We felt this zippered flap added unnecessary weight to the boot and an unnecessary lacing step.

Hiking


The Eiger GV is slightly above average in hiking performance. This is mostly due to its light weight, which did not leave us feeling like we were stomping along the trail like Shrek. We also felt that the ankle flexibility didn't compromise our natural gait.

Best Applications


This boot did a good job protecting our feet from wet snow.
This boot did a good job protecting our feet from wet snow.

This boot is best for climbers interested in mixed climbing and dry tooling, who will also find themselves on the occasional ice pitch. Its moderate insulation, low weight, and hiking ability could also be appreciated by mountaineers who have light and fast outings in spring, summer, and fall in mind.

Value


At $620 MSRP this boot is a bit more than some of the other boots with similar scores. We think it's an okay, but not great, value for most climbers.

Conclusion


This boot is optimized for light and fast mixed and rock climbing. It's very light, and the uppers are built for mixed climbing performance. When it comes to colder days and steep ice, it's certainly functional, but not ideal. It's the analog to the Nepal Cube, a boot built for ice climbing that also works for mixed and rock climbing.

The Eiger GV does fine on steep ice  but move to mixed terrain to explore it's climbing potential.
The Eiger GV does fine on steep ice, but move to mixed terrain to explore it's climbing potential.


Ian McEleney