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DMM Rhino Review

The simplest and most versatile anti-crossloading locking carabiner
Top Pick Award
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Price:  $17 List | $11.96 at Amazon
Compare prices at 2 resellers
Pros:  Simple design, very versatile, affordable
Cons:  Doesn’t prevent rotation with an ATC style belay device, a bit heavy, can be awkward on a gear loop
Manufacturer:   DMM
By Andy Wellman ⋅ Senior Review Editor  ⋅  Aug 15, 2019
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70
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#6 of 14
  • Overall Utility - 25% 8
  • Ease of Unlocking and Locking - 25% 7
  • Compactness and Weight - 20% 6
  • Gate Security - 20% 6
  • Gate Clearance - 10% 8

Our Verdict

The DMM Rhino is our favorite carabiner to belay with, especially when belaying with an active assisted braking device such as a Petzl GriGri or Trango Vergo, which is why we recognize it as a Top Pick. Cross-loading of a carabiner occurs when the force is not oriented along the spine, which is engineered to be the strongest orientation, and there are seemingly countless designs that attempt to prevent this from happening. Especially when belaying, we find that the action of taking in and feeding out rope to a leader can easily allow the locker to shift, opening it up to a potential cross-loading situation. DMM's solution to this is adding a small "horn" to the outside of the spine, hence the name Rhino, that prevents belay devices from moving off of the basket and onto the spine. This solution is so simple and effective, it is impossible for us not to tout the merits of great engineering.


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DMM Rhino
Awards Top Pick Award Editors' Choice Award Top Pick Award Top Pick Award  
Price $11.96 at Amazon
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Pros Simple design, very versatile, affordableVersatile, lightweight, relatively affordable, lots of gate clearance, gate security stripe.Light, auto-locking, versatileLight, small, least amount of revolutions needed for screwgate to lock or unlockVery quick and easy to unlock, auto-locks, very light and compact
Cons Doesn’t prevent rotation with an ATC style belay device, a bit heavy, can be awkward on a gear loopScrewgate can get stuck closed, aluminum I-beam construction wears out quicker than some.Can freeze shut, hard to open at times, locks shut on gear loopsExpensive compared to alternatives, the least amount of gate clearanceLocking mechanism not as secure as others, locking slider can block closure of gate
Bottom Line The simplest and most versatile anti-crossloading locking carabinerThe best and most versatile locker at a reasonable price.Worthy of our Top Pick as the best auto-locking carabiner you can buy.Our favorite personal locker is great for building anchorsA unique tool for greater peace of mind while leading
Rating Categories DMM Rhino Petzl Attache Vaporlock Magnetron DMM Phantom Edelrid Pure Slider
Overall Utility (25%)
10
0
8
10
0
10
10
0
8
10
0
7
10
0
7
Ease Of Unlocking And Locking (25%)
10
0
7
10
0
7
10
0
5
10
0
8
10
0
9
Compactness And Weight (20%)
10
0
6
10
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8
10
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8
10
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10
10
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9
Gate Security (20%)
10
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6
10
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7
10
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9
10
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6
10
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4
Gate Clearance (10%)
10
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8
10
0
10
10
0
8
10
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3
10
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5
Specs DMM Rhino Petzl Attache Vaporlock Magnetron DMM Phantom Edelrid Pure Slider
Weight 73 g 57 g 56 g 41 g 43 g
Gate Closed Strength (KN) 27 22 24 24 23
Sideways Strength (KN) 9 7 7 9 8
Gate Open Strength (KN) 7 6 7 9 8
Gate Clearance 2.2 cm 2.6 cm 2.2 cm 1.6 cm 1.8 cm
Visual Locking Indicator? No Yes Autolocking No Autolocking
Carabiner Shape Offset D/HMS Pear/HMS Pear/HMS Offset-D Offset-D
Lock Closure Type Triple action, double-action, or Screwgate Screw-lock Magnetron Autolocking Screwgate Autolocking Slider

Our Analysis and Test Results

The DMM Rhino looks just like almost any other standard HMS or pear style locking carabiner, such as the Petzl Attache, but has the small little "horn" added to the outside of the spine that effectively blocks devices such as GriGris from rotating around onto the spine. Combined with a wide and flat crotch that allows the thick, flat webbing of a belay loop to sit properly, and the Rhino provides the simplest anti-crossloading solution. Since it is shaped exactly like an HMS carabiner, and doesn't have wonky features such as dual gates, or gates with strange blocking hooks, or even internal spring bars — all designed to keep the locker oriented correctly — it is more versatile for multi-pitch anchors than other belay specific carabiners. We tested a screwgate style gate, but it also comes with either a double-action auto-locking gate, or a triple-action auto-locking gate.

Of course, it is worth noting that unlike the design concepts that hold the carabiner in place on a belay loop to prevent it from cross-loading, the Rhino can still float freely. For this reason, it is less likely to prevent a cross-loaded situation when belaying with a tube-style belay device such as a Black Diamond ATC. It still works great for this purpose, but merely acts like any regular locking pear-shaped carabiner.

Performance Comparison


The Rhino is our Top Pick for belaying with a GriGri because of its simple and elegant solution to prevent cross-loading while belaying. The horn on the outside of the spine blocks the device from rotating around into a less desirable position  as you can see here. The screw gate mechanism functions the same way on the other side. This small feature is effective while also ensuring that it is very versatile for uses in other situations.
The Rhino is our Top Pick for belaying with a GriGri because of its simple and elegant solution to prevent cross-loading while belaying. The horn on the outside of the spine blocks the device from rotating around into a less desirable position, as you can see here. The screw gate mechanism functions the same way on the other side. This small feature is effective while also ensuring that it is very versatile for uses in other situations.

Overall Utility


We love the way this carabiner works. It is designed to prevent any device with a small hole to be able to slide around onto the spine, where it can potentially cross-load. We have pointed out that the "horn" works to accomplish this on the spine, but when it comes to the gate, we also found that the locking mechanism, in our case a screw lock, also accomplishes the same feat, so a GriGri or similar device cannot slide off of the basket in either direction. GriGri's are not the only device this works with, as we noticed that our Trango Vergo belay device is also held in place, as are some devices commonly used for top-rope soloing, such as the Petzl MicroTraxion and the CAMP USA Lift Ascender. These lockers also work great to attach to regular big wall ascenders.


Due to the horn preventing a GriGri from rotating around the locker  it can only hang in one way on a harnesses gear loop  as shown. When removing it  be careful not to accidentally dump the device off the nose as you rotate the 'biner. This is one of the few minor downsides with this excellent carabiner.
Due to the horn preventing a GriGri from rotating around the locker, it can only hang in one way on a harnesses gear loop, as shown. When removing it, be careful not to accidentally dump the device off the nose as you rotate the 'biner. This is one of the few minor downsides with this excellent carabiner.

We found the rest of this locker's features to function at a high level as well. The gate action is very smooth and snappy, as is the screw locking gate that we tested. The basket is made of thick round stock that makes it an ideal choice for rappelling or belaying with a tube-style device, and will allow for greater longevity compared to I-beam lockers. One slight complaint we discovered is that since a GriGri can only live on the basket of the device, if we try to hang it on a gear loop of our harness, the 'biner cannot spin. When removing the locker and GriGri from this belay loop, there is therefore a slightly greater risk that the device could accidentally slip off the nose and be dropped, so slightly more attention is required.

Our testing revealed that the Rhino works just like any other locker when belaying or rapelling with an ATC-style device  and due to the flat crotch where the belay loop rests  does not frequently rotate out of position. However  the horn that blocks GriGris and other similar devices from rotating out of position does not stop this from happening with a standard belay device.
Our testing revealed that the Rhino works just like any other locker when belaying or rapelling with an ATC-style device, and due to the flat crotch where the belay loop rests, does not frequently rotate out of position. However, the horn that blocks GriGris and other similar devices from rotating out of position does not stop this from happening with a standard belay device.

Ease of Unlocking and Locking


We tested a screw gate version of the Rhino, but as we mentioned you can also buy double or triple action auto-locking versions. The screw gate is easy to manipulate, with friction ridges that aid your grip, especially if using gloves. If you are ice or winter climbing and have gloves on, screw gate lockers are certainly the best choice for this reason.


To go from completely locked to completely open, or vice versa, requires six half turns, or three full revolutions of the locking mechanism. This is relatively few, although not quite as quick as the only two full turns of the very similar gate found on the DMM Phantom Screwgate. That said, it is among the quickest and easiest screw gates to quickly open or closed, and having a locker that does not automatically lock is far more convenient when taking it off of the harness.

This screw gate is very smooth and easy to twist; we measured 3.5 full revolutions to go from fully locked to fully unlocked and vise versa.
This screw gate is very smooth and easy to twist; we measured 3.5 full revolutions to go from fully locked to fully unlocked and vise versa.

Compactness and Weight


This carabiner weighed 73g on our independent scale, which is not the heaviest locker in our review, but also roughly 20g heavier than very similarly shaped HMS style lockers.


It does not use the same I-beam construction that some other pear shaped lockers use to trim weight, which should actually mean that it will withstand more abrasive abuse without prematurely wearing through. As an HMS shaped locker, it is necessarily on the larger side, due to the fact that it needs to be able to hold a Munter-hitch, and is thus quite a bit larger than the most compact lockers we tested.

At 73g  this locker is fairly light for a belay specific carabiner  but is quite a bit heavier than similarly shaped pear lockers. Much of this is due to the fat rounded stock used in the basket  which is an ideal surface for a rope under tension to run over.
At 73g, this locker is fairly light for a belay specific carabiner, but is quite a bit heavier than similarly shaped pear lockers. Much of this is due to the fat rounded stock used in the basket, which is an ideal surface for a rope under tension to run over.

Gate Security


Compared to auto-locking carabiners, screw gates such as the one that we tested are not the most secure. The main concern when using a screw gate is that you remember to lock it in the first place. Anyone who has climbed their fair share of long multi-pitch routes knows that it is not that uncommon to forget to screw closed a gate once or twice during a long day. Additionally, screw gates sometimes have a propensity to become unlocked on their own over time due to repetitive micro-vibrations and gravity conspiring to allow the gate mechanism to slowly unscrew itself.


One feature that can aid in the security of a screw gate is a visual indicator, usually in the form of a red stripe, that lets you quickly ascertain that the gate is indeed locked closed. If the screw mechanism is closed, it will cover the red stripe. On the other hand, if the gate is unlocked, the red stripe will be visible, so you can quickly see whether the gate is locked, without needing to check by squeezing it. While the Mad Rock Gemini and the Petzl Attache have indicators like this, unfortunately the Rhino does not, meaning among lockers, it does not have the most secure gate you can buy.

We tested a screw gate locker  which has no visual indicator  meaning the best way to be sure that you have remembered to lock it is to squeeze the gate to be sure it doesn't open. For those who want added security  you can also buy a double-action or triple-action locking gate in the same design.
We tested a screw gate locker, which has no visual indicator, meaning the best way to be sure that you have remembered to lock it is to squeeze the gate to be sure it doesn't open. For those who want added security, you can also buy a double-action or triple-action locking gate in the same design.

Gate Clearance


We measured the gate clearance for this locker at 2.2cm, ranking it up there near the top of the pile with those other carabiners with the largest openings.


This is significant because lockers are designed to be used to securely attach items to other items, often ropes using knots. The larger the opening, the easier it is to slide on the multiple loops of a Munter or clove hitch without hindrance. It also makes belaying or rappelling with two ropes far easier, and in general allows for more streamlined use of the carabiner. Often times this quality of a locker is not noticeable unless the gate opening is too small, in which case it becomes immediately noticeable, for the wrong reasons. With such a large opening, the Rhino is versatile enough for use in any situation you may choose to use a locker, which is one reason we love it so much.

We measured the amount of gate clearance at 2.2 cm  making it one of the widest opening carabiners we tested. It also has a deep  rounded basket  and the combination of these features makes it very easy to use  especially when tying knots with thick ropes.
We measured the amount of gate clearance at 2.2 cm, making it one of the widest opening carabiners we tested. It also has a deep, rounded basket, and the combination of these features makes it very easy to use, especially when tying knots with thick ropes.

Value


While it isn't the single most inexpensive locker you can buy, compared to other anti-crossloading lockers, the Rhino presents excellent value. It is less expensive than the DMM Belay Master 2, another device that accomplishes nearly the same purpose, and is less than half the price of the Petzl Freino or the Edelrid HMS Bulletproof Triple FG. If you are looking for a solid belay specific carabiner, this presents one of the best values you can find!

Conclusion


The DMM Rhino presents perhaps the most elegant solution to the problem of belay devices cross-loading when catching a fall, and is also one of the most affordable options for that purpose. We also like it because it lacks gadgets that can get in the way of performing other routine locking carabiner tasks, such as tying off at a multi-pitch anchor. It is very versatile, well made, and all-around a great choice for any climber.


Andy Wellman