The world's most in-depth and scientific reviews of outdoor gear

Petzl Pur'Anneau Sling Review

A top-notch sling at a top-shelf price
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Price:  $13 List | $12.85 at Amazon
Compare prices at 2 resellers
Pros:  Very light, low bulk, easy to manipulate, very small bar tack
Cons:  High price, harder than some to untie knots
Manufacturer:   Petzl
By Andy Wellman ⋅ Senior Review Editor  ⋅  Apr 11, 2019
  • Share this article:
82
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#2 of 12
  • Handle - 25% 8
  • Knot Test - 25% 6
  • Alpine Quickdraw Test - 20% 9
  • Weight - 15% 10
  • Bulk - 15% 9

Our Verdict

The Petzl Pur'Anneau Sling is a very light, supple, and high performing sling made out of "high-modulus polyethylene" (basically the same as Dyneema). While it isn't quite as thin as our Editors' Choice award winning Mammut Contact Sling, we think it compares very favorably in almost every way, including weight, measuring a mere 19g. In fact, we love pretty much everything about this sling except for the price — it unfortunately costs roughly $4 more than its competition if paying retail — making it somewhat of a tough sell. If you are in the market for the most supple and high performing sling you can find, then you are in the right place, but be warned that similar high quality can be found for less money.


Compare to Similar Products

 
Awards  Editors' Choice Award    
Price $12.85 at Amazon
Compare at 2 sellers
$6.95 at Backcountry
Compare at 3 sellers
$6.95 at REI
Compare at 3 sellers
$10.95 at Backcountry
Compare at 2 sellers
$8.50 at REI
Compare at 2 sellers
Overall Score Sort Icon
100
0
82
100
0
85
100
0
78
100
0
77
100
0
75
Star Rating
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Pros Very light, low bulk, easy to manipulate, very small bar tackLow weight, very thin, handles great, affordableLight weight, low bulk, knots untie relatively easily, affordableCovered sewn bar tack, thin and lightLow price, light weight despite width, small bar tack
Cons High price, harder than some to untie knotsWeighted knots harder to untie than thicker slingsNot as soft a handle as other top scorersExpensive, rubberized covering adds weight and feels weird sliding through handsAbrasive edges, wide for the weight
Bottom Line A top-notch sling at a top-shelf priceThe best climbing sling due to its great handle and low weight and width.A fantastic lightweight flat sling that is also affordableA great sling that costs more than it seems like it shouldA solid sling at a fantastic price
Rating Categories Petzl Pur'Anneau Sling Mammut Contact Dyneema Black Diamond Dynex Runner Sterling Dyneema Sling Trango Low Bulk 11mm Sling
Handle (25%)
10
0
8
10
0
9
10
0
7
10
0
7
10
0
7
Knot Test (25%)
10
0
6
10
0
5
10
0
7
10
0
7
10
0
7
Alpine Quickdraw Test (20%)
10
0
9
10
0
10
10
0
8
10
0
9
10
0
8
Weight (15%)
10
0
10
10
0
10
10
0
9
10
0
8
10
0
9
Bulk (15%)
10
0
9
10
0
10
10
0
9
10
0
8
10
0
7
Specs Petzl Pur'Anneau... Mammut Contact... Black Diamond... Sterling Dyneema... Trango Low Bulk...
Type of Fiber High-Modulus Polyethalene Dyneema Dynex Dyneema Dyneema
Measured weight 19g 19g 20g 22g 20g
Width Tested 10mm 8mm 10mm 10mm 11mm
Length Tested 60cm 60cm 60cm 60cm 60cm
Strength 22Kn 22Kn 22Kn 22Kn 22Kn
Widths Available 10mm 8mm 10mm 10mm; 12mm 11mm
Lengths Available 60cm; 120cm; 180cm 60cm; 120cm 30cm; 60cm; 120cm; 240cm 10"; 24"; 30"; 48" 30cm; 60cm; 120cm

Our Analysis and Test Results

The Petzl Pur'Anneau Sling compares very favorably to our Editors' Choice award winning Mammut Contact Sling, weighing in at the exact same 19g, the lightest in the review, despite the fact that it is 2mm thicker. The sling is made of a flat piece of webbing instead of tubular like the Contact Sling, and is very soft and supple in the hands and easy to manipulate. We also love how small the bar tack is compared to the rest of the slings we tested, certainly begging the question, "why can't they all be this small?" The one area where this sling performs a bit lower than others is in our knot test: we find that the soft, flat webbing does a better job cinching down tight into a figure-eight knot than some of the thicker and stiffer slings, such as the Camp USA 11mm Express Dyneema Runner, which unfortunately means that knots are harder to untie after being weighted. Our largest (and only) complaint about this sling is the price, as it is the most costly sling in this review.

Performance Comparison


Leading the first finger crack pitch of the Naked Edge in Eldorado Canyon. In order to climb faster (and with a lot of insider knowledge)  we combined the five pitch route into two long pitches with a bit of simul-climbing. A large selection of slings was key to make this work.
Leading the first finger crack pitch of the Naked Edge in Eldorado Canyon. In order to climb faster (and with a lot of insider knowledge), we combined the five pitch route into two long pitches with a bit of simul-climbing. A large selection of slings was key to make this work.

Handle


This sling is made out of what Petzl calls "high-modulus polyethylene," which is essentially the same compound as Dyneema, but without a stated brand name. It is extremely smooth and supple to the touch, without any hint of stiffness. Like all Dyneema slings, it has a small amount of Nylon fibers on the edges, although as far as we can tell nowhere near the same amount as the Metolius Open Loop Sling, which is also stiffer. We love how the bar tack on this sling is significantly smaller than on all the other slings, and because it has to be rated to the same 22kN strength rating, it makes us wonder why all of the slings can't be sewn with a small bar tack. Despite that, it still has tabs on either end that can hang up on biners occasionally.

This sling is 10mm wide and made entirely of an unbranded Dyneema-like fiber  and is super soft and supple. It is easily one of the friendliest slings against the skin  and also has one of the smallest bar tacks.
This sling is 10mm wide and made entirely of an unbranded Dyneema-like fiber, and is super soft and supple. It is easily one of the friendliest slings against the skin, and also has one of the smallest bar tacks.

Knot Test


Our results in the knot test are pretty much the only knock, with the exception of price, that we have against this sling. We find it easy to tie knots due to its supple nature, although like most slings it is easy to incorporate twists into the knots. However, it is this same flexible suppleness that enables a figure-eight knot to become tighter welded than similar width slings, such as the Black Diamond Dynex Runner or the Sterling Dyneema Sling. After weighting, we find this sling a bit harder to untie than those other two, and so rated it a hair lower. While we tested the 60cm version, it also comes in 120cm and 240cm versions, which would be good lengths for equalizing pieces at an anchor, but this sling will work better for those purposes if you avoid tying figure-eight knots.

Tying knots in this supple sling in a cinch  although its thin nature also means that they tend to cinch down pretty tight. Like all slings  however  the clove hitch is easy to loosen  even after weighting.
Tying knots in this supple sling in a cinch, although its thin nature also means that they tend to cinch down pretty tight. Like all slings, however, the clove hitch is easy to loosen, even after weighting.

Flat slings in particular are prone to twist working their way into a knot  as this one here is showing. These twists don't compromise the safety of the knot  although they can make them harder to untie. This supple sling tended to be harder than most to untie a figure eight knot once it had been weighted.
Flat slings in particular are prone to twist working their way into a knot, as this one here is showing. These twists don't compromise the safety of the knot, although they can make them harder to untie. This supple sling tended to be harder than most to untie a figure eight knot once it had been weighted.

Alpine Quickdraw Test


With a skinny 10mm width and thin shape, there is less friction with this sling between itself or a carabiner when making an alpine quickdraw. This allows for easy equalizing of the tripled up loops in short mode, and also allows for very simple and easy extending into long mode. After many tests, one time we did experience the bar tack, with its tabs hanging off the two ends, hanging up on the carabiner as we extended it, but this affront was minor. In general, we think it is one of the best at this task, on par with the Sterling Dyneema Sewn Runner, which has a rubberized plastic sheath covering its bar tack.

Only 10mm wide and with a small bar tack  the Petzl Pur'Anneau is one of the best slings for easily tripling up into an alpine quickdraw.
Only 10mm wide and with a small bar tack, the Petzl Pur'Anneau is one of the best slings for easily tripling up into an alpine quickdraw.

Weight


Despite the extra two millimeters of width difference between the Pur'Anneau Sling and the Mammut Contact Sling, the two tie for the lowest weight at a mere 19g. This is a hair lighter (probably literally!) than the Trango Low Bulk 11 Sling, which is 11mm wide. It is also a tad lighter than the similarly 10mm wide Black Diamond Dynex Sewn Runner. If weight is a concern for your selection, then the Per'Anneau should be a top choice.

At the low weight of 19g  this is tied for the lightest sling we tested.
At the low weight of 19g, this is tied for the lightest sling we tested.

Bulk


At only 10mm wide and as flat as can be, this sling is easily one of the least bulky that you can buy, ensuring that it racks very nicely on the harness without taking up too much space. It is the same width as the BD Dynex Runner, although that one bulges in the middle and tapers towards the edges, while this one is simply perfectly flat. While bulk may not be the most important metric for choosing a sling, we think there is no reason to not choose a less bulky one if that is available, making this sling a great option.

The narrowest and least bulky slings  laid out for comparison. From the top: The 8mm Mammut Contact  10mm Petzl Pur'Anneau (white)  10mm Black Diamond Dynex (yellow)  10mm Sterling Dyneema (yellow)  and for comparison on the bottom  the 17mm Sterling Nylon.
The narrowest and least bulky slings, laid out for comparison. From the top: The 8mm Mammut Contact, 10mm Petzl Pur'Anneau (white), 10mm Black Diamond Dynex (yellow), 10mm Sterling Dyneema (yellow), and for comparison on the bottom, the 17mm Sterling Nylon.

Best Applications


The Petzl Pur'Anneau Sling is an ideal choice for extending pieces of protection while on lead to reduce rope drag. In particular it is a great choice for long routes or in the alpine where weight and bulk are larger considerations. It comes in 4x and 8x lengths for use equalizing anchors, but if you intend to use it for this purpose, be warned that it can be hard to easily untie welded figure-eight knots.

The Petzl Pur'Anneau Sling tied with a slip knot around a large chicken head high on the Resolution Arete on Mt. Wilson  Red Rocks. By slinging a horn such as this one  a sling goes from simply extending the protection to providing the protection.
The Petzl Pur'Anneau Sling tied with a slip knot around a large chicken head high on the Resolution Arete on Mt. Wilson, Red Rocks. By slinging a horn such as this one, a sling goes from simply extending the protection to providing the protection.

Value


This sling retails for about $13, making it far and away the most expensive sling in this review. That still isn't a whole lot of money, and we think that you are getting an excellent product, and a good value. However, almost any other sling in this review will provide adequate performance for less money, so this isn't a very economical choice.

Most long traditional climbs tend to wander quite a lot as they follow the natural weaknesses  a good reason to have plenty of slings to extend your gear placements. Here on a sidewalk traverse high on Resolution Arete  Red Rocks.
Most long traditional climbs tend to wander quite a lot as they follow the natural weaknesses, a good reason to have plenty of slings to extend your gear placements. Here on a sidewalk traverse high on Resolution Arete, Red Rocks.

Conclusion


The Petzl Pur'Anneau Sling is one of the highest rated slings in our comparative performance testing, and is particularly noteworthy for its low weight and bulk, as well as its soft, supple handle. It would easily be one of our top recommendations if it wasn't considerably more expensive than any other sling in this review.


Andy Wellman