The world's most in-depth and scientific reviews of outdoor gear

La Sportiva Miura VS - Women's Review

A technical climbing powerhouse, perfect for crimpy limestone lines or long granite free climbs.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Price:  $185 List | $175.00 at Backcountry
Compare prices at 3 resellers
Pros:  Great edging shoe, precise, versatile
Cons:  Specific shape can cause discomfort for some, expensive
Manufacturer:   La Sportiva
By Jane Jackson ⋅ Senior Review Editor  ⋅  Jun 6, 2019
  • Share this article:
82
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#5 of 18
  • Comfort - 25% 8
  • Sensitivity - 25% 9
  • Edging - 15% 9
  • Cracks - 15% 6
  • Pockets - 15% 9
  • Ease of Use - 5% 6

Our Verdict

The La Sportiva Miura VS is a stiff, aggressively shaped edging powerhouse. These shoes allowed us to stand on incredibly small holds, while their aggressive shape, with a slight downturn, makes the Miura VS a master of precision. These shoes were our weapon of choice on the technical, gently overhanging limestone of Siurana. We also found the Miuras to compete with their lace-up counterparts, the Miura Lace, on vertical terrain, since the two share incredible edging power. The Velcro model is much more downturned than the lace-up version, and a bit stiffer, making it great for the steeps. These features make it more akin to the La Sportiva Kataki in terms of all-around performance.

There are a few downsides to the Miura, especially when it comes to fit. These shoes take a while to break in, and we found them to be downright painful at first. Their stiffness and aggressive shape also made for some bothersome voids beneath the tongue.


Compare to Similar Products

 
Awards  Editors' Choice Award   Top Pick Award 
Price $175.00 at Backcountry
Compare at 3 sellers
$175.00 at Backcountry
Compare at 2 sellers
$165.00 at Amazon
Compare at 3 sellers
$185.00 at REI
Compare at 3 sellers
Check Price at Amazon
Compare at 3 sellers
Overall Score Sort Icon
100
0
82
100
0
91
100
0
89
100
0
85
100
0
83
Star Rating
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Pros Great edging shoe, precise, versatileSensitive, great for edging, supportive, comfortable, versatileComfortable, high performance, sticky rubber, easy to put on, good in cracks, versatileComfortable, extremely sensitive, great for smearing and steep climbing, easy to get on and offGood for steep climbing, break in well, conforms to foot shape, comfortable, aggressive shape
Cons Specific shape can cause discomfort for some, expensiveExpensiveStretch out quickly, costly, lack supportExpensive, No-Edge technology could be an acquired tasteExpensive, lacks versatility
Bottom Line A technical climbing powerhouse, perfect for crimpy limestone lines or long granite free climbs.The Kataki wins our Editors' Choice Award for their combination of comfort, sensitivity, and edging prowess.The Skwama are impressive in many realms, combining comfort with a high performance fit.If you let them, they may revolutionize your footwork; they'll take some getting used to, but are top notch for steep climbing.The Solution gets our Top Pick for steep climbing and bouldering for their aggressive shape, precision, and comfortable design.
Rating Categories Miura VS La Sportiva Kataki - Women's La Sportiva Skwama - Women's La Sportiva Futura - Women's Solution
Comfort (25%)
10
0
8
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
8
Sensitivity (25%)
10
0
9
10
0
10
10
0
9
10
0
10
10
0
9
Edging (15%)
10
0
9
10
0
10
10
0
7
10
0
7
10
0
7
Cracks (15%)
10
0
6
10
0
7
10
0
9
10
0
5
10
0
7
Pockets (15%)
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
10
10
0
10
10
0
10
Ease Of Use (5%)
10
0
6
10
0
8
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
9
Specs Miura VS La Sportiva Kataki... La Sportiva Skwama... La Sportiva Futura... Solution
Style Velcro Lace Velcro Velcro Velcro
Weight (Per Pair, size 37) .94 lb 1.08 lb 1.00 lb .91 lb 1.06 lb
Width Options Regular Regular Regular Regular Regular
Fit High Asymmetry Asymmetrical Asymmetrical High Asymmetry Asymmetrical
Upper Leather Suede leather microfiber Leather/Microfiber Leather/ Synthetic Leather/Lorica
Lining Dentex Pacific Unlined Unlined HF (heel and toe box only)
Sole Rubber Vibram XSGrip2 Vibram XS Grip2 Vibram XS Grip2 Vibram XSGrip2 Vibram XS Grip2

Our Analysis and Test Results

With a stiff platform and an aggressive shape, the Miura VS are masters of precision, shining in the realm of technical climbing.

Performance Comparison


Jen  shown above  climbs exclusively in the Miura VS - from techy granite trad routes to steep limestone sport climbs.
Jen, shown above, climbs exclusively in the Miura VS - from techy granite trad routes to steep limestone sport climbs.

Comfort


An entirely different shape from their lace-up counterparts, the Miura VS also comes with its fair share of fit issues. The Velcro version of this shoe has a more padded tongue, which we loved. It also has a slightly wider last than the Miura, which helped our wide-footed lead tester break the Velcro model in faster. That said, the VS was painful at first, especially because we sized ours for a performance fit. Having these shoes fit snug makes them all the better when it comes to edging.

We had trouble getting the Velcro straps to lay flat on the Miura VS  which created a void on the top of our foot. Though it looked strange  this didn't affect the shoe's performance.
We had trouble getting the Velcro straps to lay flat on the Miura VS, which created a void on the top of our foot. Though it looked strange, this didn't affect the shoe's performance.

We also ran into some issues with the tongue and Velcro straps, which, when tightened, didn't sit flat across the top of our foot. We also noticed a gap on the top of our foot, on the side of the tongue. These issues with fit were probably a result of having a wide foot. Next time, we would opt for the men's version to accommodate our wide feet, as the men's has a wider last.

Sensitivity


Though they are stiff, the Miura VS is an incredibly sensitive shoe. The P3 technology, combined with the Miura VS's fairly aggressive downturn, means that all your standing power transfers to the tip of your toe. This, combined with Vibram's XS Grip2 rubber, allowed us to trust our feet and feel the texture of the rock through the soles of the Miura VS. For a softer shoe that is equally as sensitive, we'd recommend the Skwama.

The Miura VS is both stiff and sensitive  making it a precise shoe for technical climbing.
The Miura VS is both stiff and sensitive, making it a precise shoe for technical climbing.

Edging


A day spent toeing in to tiny footholds on a gently overhung wall is the Miura VS's ideal day. These shoes are made for edging; with La Sportiva's Slingshot rand and Powerhinge technology, the Miuras literally pull you into the wall by forcing your weight into the toe. Their downturn was not an issue on vertical terrain because their stiffness allows the Miura to hold shape, even when standing on a vertical wall. We found this was not the case with the very downturned but very soft Scarpa Furia, which did not do very well as an edging shoe.

The Miura VS is an edging pro  much like its lace-up counterpart.
The Miura VS is an edging pro, much like its lace-up counterpart.

Crack Climbing


If you are trying to send your technical, thin crack project, the Miura VS might do the trick. If long, red Camalot splitters are what you seek, a softer, less aggressive shoe might be a better place to look. The Miura VS can stem and edge like a boss — skills that come in handy on hard trad routes; their ability to climb straight in cracks is less than ideal. For that, look to the Five Ten Anasazi LV or another less aggressive model.

Pockets


With their downturned shape, the Miura VS toes into pockets with the best of them. Their sensitivity and edging prowess come in handy in steeper terrain, especially when paired with their aggressive shape. These shoes perform better on overhanging terrain than their lace-up counterpart, the Miura. Though the VS did well on pockets, we actually preferred a softer shoe, like the Skwama for pocket climbing, since we were able to cam our toes in. Perhaps we are just trad climbers at heart…

Toeing into a tiny limestone pocket in the Miura VS.
Toeing into a tiny limestone pocket in the Miura VS.

Ease of Use


With three Velcro straps instead of the usual two, the Miura VS is a bit more time consuming to get on and off than most of the Velcro models we reviewed. That said, these three straps make it easy to fine-tune their fit and adjust the Miura VS to the desired tightness.

Best Application


These shoes are best used for technical face climbing on vertical to gently overhung terrain. Techy limestone, granite edging, and bouldering are the best uses for the Miura. If they fit comfortably, their slightly downturned shape also translates to a good gym shoe.

Once broken in  the Miura VS are a great shoe for any terrain  especially the sweet  sweet limestone of Catalunya.
Once broken in, the Miura VS are a great shoe for any terrain, especially the sweet, sweet limestone of Catalunya.

Value


Like most of the top-level shoes in this review, the Miura VS cost a pretty penny. With a price tag of $185, these shoes are an investment. Their edging ability, sensitivity, and overall design make them a fairly versatile shoe. We know some women who climb strictly in the Miura VS; from long free climbs in Yosemite Valley, to sandstone bouldering, to European limestone. This is a testament to the Miura's ability to climb well in a wide range of disciplines.

The Miura VS is a great all-arounder  which makes them a good value in our eyes.
The Miura VS is a great all-arounder, which makes them a good value in our eyes.

Conclusion


The La Sportiva Miura VS is an all-around technical master. We recommend these shoes for any form of hard climbing — from sport climbing to bouldering — where the difference between sending and failure could be as simple as a botched foot placement. The Miuras can edge on granite razor blades and toe in on slippery limestone pockets with ease. Though they can be painful to break in, the Miura VS willl perform with the best of them.


Jane Jackson