The world's most in-depth and scientific reviews of gear

TOAKS Titanium Folding Review

A clever concept to maximize cutlery efficiency but lacking in execution
TOAKS Titanium Folding
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Price:  $11 List | $8.95 at REI
Compare prices at 2 resellers
Pros:  Durable material, packable
Cons:  Difficult to lock open, uncomfortable to eat with, high price for low performance
Manufacturer:   TOAKS
By Leslie Yedor ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  May 17, 2018
  • Share this article:
Our Editors independently research, test, and rate the best products. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Learn more
50
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#8 of 9
  • Eating - 35% 4
  • Durability - 30% 6
  • Cooking - 20% 5
  • Cleaning - 15% 5

Our Verdict

The Toaks Titanium Folding is a compact gadget that when extended is the length of a standard utensil but folds in half to tuck neatly inside your backpacking kitchen kit. It's constructed of solid titanium which provides added strength and reassurance that the material isn't going to leach chemicals into your food. In other categories, however, this model was found to be considerably lacking. It's cumbersome to eat with and after collapsing every few bites, using it became a chore. It's ok, but not our top recommendation for folding models, or otherwise.

Compare to Similar Products

Our Analysis and Test Results

Measuring the length of a standard utensil at 6.5 inches when extended, but shrinking to 3.75 inches when folded, the Toaks Titanium Folding is a clever concept aimed at reducing both the number of utensils and the occupied space of your cutlery needs. Unfortunate for this model, convenience comes at the expense of performance, and it scored poorly compared to the other models tested.

Performance Comparison


This folding model brings the convenience of collapsibility in a titanium design.
This folding model brings the convenience of collapsibility in a titanium design.

Eating


Despite having fairly standard dimensions when at its full length, this product proved to be altogether uncomfortable to eat with. Its wide bowl was a poor fit in every testers' mouth, and the clanking of metal on teeth with each bite of food is sure to make any dentist cringe.

The hollow handle makes for a strange grip when eating.
The hollow handle makes for a strange grip when eating.

While the hollow design of the handle saves on weight, it's awkward to hold. To keep this utensil at full attention, a thin metal bar is slid down the shaft pushing the sides of the handle apart and jamming the folding joint into place. In theory, it may be simple, but in practice, it takes some serious elbow grease to slide the metal locking mechanism far enough into place to prevent this model from collapsing with every bite of food. This model is too good at folding to perform well as an actual utensil.

Durability


Regarding true breakability, this model performed well in our durability testing. It didn't break or bend; it was prone to collapsing instead. When the locking mechanism is not engaged, it's also easy to separate the handle from the main body of the spork. The avid backpacker can expect to lose one half or the other eventually. Let's hope its the handle or that the rest of your meals make good finger food.

Slide the horizontal locking bar firmly into place to prevent collapsing while cooking or eating.
Slide the horizontal locking bar firmly into place to prevent collapsing while cooking or eating.

Cooking


Cooking with this product was similar to eating with it. While it got the job done, it was uncomfortable to hold, and the hollow handle made it harder to keep your fingers out of your food when stirring. Like most of the other competitors, a non-stick pan was no match for this utensil.

Cooking requires delicate hand work to keep your fingers out of the meal.
Cooking requires delicate hand work to keep your fingers out of the meal.

Cleaning


The bowl and tines of this product were easy to wipe or rinse clean, but the locking mechanism collected bits of food which were difficult to get out without the meticulous use of a sponge. Even though mustaches might be cool, but no one wants a flavor saver for a utensil.

Value


This is one of the more expensive models we tested, and it performed poorly across the board. If you're devoted to finding a folding option, try the MSR Folding for a fraction of the price.

When extended  this model is the standard 6.5 inches.
It collapses to mere 3.75 inches when folded in half.

Conclusion


While we loved the idea of a folding titanium model, the Toaks Titanium Folding comes up short in the execution of such a clever concept. Its uncomfortable bowl and handle combine with its poorly designed locking mechanism make it tough to recommend.

Leslie Yedor