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Eureka Midori 6 Review

A great tent for infrequent or new campers who want a good experience but don't want to spend a lot of money on a camping tent.
Eureka Midori 6
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Price:  $300 List
Pros:  Inexpensive, lighter and smaller for large size, simple and straightforward design and setup
Cons:  Little storage space, not designed for inside hang-out comfort, awkward to sleep all 6 campers
Manufacturer:   Eureka
By Lyra Pierotti ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Oct 1, 2016
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75
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort - 40% 7
  • Weather Resistance - 25% 8
  • Ease of Set Up - 15% 9
  • Workmanship - 15% 6
  • Packed Size - 5% 9

The Skinny

The Eureka Midori 6 is Discontinued as of Spring 2018
The Eureka Midori 6 is a simple and relatively lightweight tent for this category. This is a tent we would consider taking on a family backpacking trip if the destination is not far and the weather looks good. It didn't prove to be a high performer in any category, collecting a few issues as we assessed for each of our five criteria. However, it is very affordable and might be a great "introduction to camping" tent if your situation is just right.

Our Analysis and Test Results

Performance Comparison


Eureka Midori 6
Eureka Midori 6

Comfort


The Midori 6 stands about 6 feet tall inside, which makes it comfortable for most campers to stand up inside. However, it's dome style (two crossed poles) means it tapers quickly from the maximum height in the middle, so this tent does not provide the same quality hang out space as our award winner, the REI Kingdom 6 or the Nemo Wagontop 6.

The Eureka Midori 6 is barely tall enough for a 6 foot tall person to stand up  and if you use the detachable gear loft   you'll lose some of that head room.
The Eureka Midori 6 is barely tall enough for a 6 foot tall person to stand up, and if you use the detachable gear loft, you'll lose some of that head room.

The Midori has a relatively generous vestibule that is indeed easy to tension, as advertised by their V3 venting system designed with a vertical strut (short section of pole) at the base (or nose) of the vestibule. The second, back door also provides ease of access for all six campers sleeping inside.
The vestibule strut on the Eureka Midori 6 actually does help to tension the vestibule of the tent.
The vestibule strut on the Eureka Midori 6 actually does help to tension the vestibule of the tent.

Eureka Midori 6
Eureka Midori 6
Eureka Midori 6
Eureka Midori 6

If you are actually maxed out, with six campers sleeping in the Midori, the inner storage pockets might seem a bit small or sparse. However, the mesh gear loft provides extra space (though at the expense of head room), and also provides an area to throw a headlamp or flashlight for some tent ambiance lighting.

Minimal pockets in the Eureka Midori 6 might make it a challenge to stay organized if you have 6 people sharing the space.
Minimal pockets in the Eureka Midori 6 might make it a challenge to stay organized if you have 6 people sharing the space.
The gear loft in the Eureka Midori 6 is a great place for a headlamp to give the tent some ambiance lighting.
The gear loft in the Eureka Midori 6 is a great place for a headlamp to give the tent some ambiance lighting.

Weather Resistance


The vestibule and V3 venting design helps improve this tent's weather resistance by pulling the fly away from the tent if you stake out the corners and the walls of the fly. But overall it was not our favorite tent for the rain. The inner tent is largely constructed of mesh, great for ventilation, but in driving rain the fly will stick to the mesh and it will be difficult to keep rain or condensation from dripping inside the tent. Higher sidewalls on the inner tent (instead of mesh), or a more generously designed fly, would improve weather resistance.

The fly attaches to the tent in the middle of the side walls  and can then be staked out to encourage more air flow and help reduce condensation and rain from dripping through the mesh of the inner tent.
The fly attaches to the tent in the middle of the side walls, and can then be staked out to encourage more air flow and help reduce condensation and rain from dripping through the mesh of the inner tent.

Ease of Set Up


This is a simple, two-pole tent that is straightforward and easy to set up. The only glitch in the setup process involves clipping the tent to the poles. Most of the attachment points are simple clips that clamp easily onto the tent poles; however, the top attachment has a hook-and-loop style attachment which often demands two hands to thread it up and over the two crossing poles. This is best to do while the tent is flat on the ground, before you tension and stand the poles up.

Most of the tent is attached to the poles with easy clips  shown here on the right; however  for some reason the top of the tent  where the two poles cross  must be attached with the hook-and-loop style attachment  shown on the left  which is difficult to maneuver if you leave it to clip last. A word for the wise  hook-and-loop those crisscrossing poles before you stand the poles up.
Most of the tent is attached to the poles with easy clips, shown here on the right; however, for some reason the top of the tent, where the two poles cross, must be attached with the hook-and-loop style attachment, shown on the left, which is difficult to maneuver if you leave it to clip last. A word for the wise, hook-and-loop those crisscrossing poles before you stand the poles up.

Workmanship


The Midori 6 will be sufficient for most car camping and light backpacking uses. It is not the most rugged tent we tested, but it is simple and we had no issues with durability or product quality. For the best illustration of quality workmanship, check out the Marmot Limestone 6, perhaps the most well-crafted and long-lasting tent in the review. The difference in workmanship can be observed in the thoughtful paneling of mesh vs. solid tent fabric, the taut fly, rugged materials, and strong stitching. The cost, however, is several more pounds and a little more bulk.

Eureka Midori 6 and Marmot Limestone 6 packed up for side-by-side comparison.
Eureka Midori 6 and Marmot Limestone 6 packed up for side-by-side comparison.

Packed Size


The Midori 6 is by far the lightest tent in this review. As such, it packs into a smaller stuff sack and is easier to pack in a vehicle crammed with five of your best friends for a weekend camping getaway. It does not have a carrying strap or handle, but it is small and light enough to be carried under an arm. This is the only tent in the review that we might consider bringing on a short summer backpacking trip for a large group or family.

Camping tents all packed up for side-by-side comparison. The Optic 6 is dead center.
Camping tents all packed up for side-by-side comparison. The Optic 6 is dead center.

Best Applications


This is an excellent tent for light and infrequent use. It is easy to fit into a car jam-packed with five of your best friends, or an excellent choice for a summer family camping trip in fair weather. As our lightest tent in the review, it can even be carried in with a large group for a short backpacking trip.

Overall, this is a great starter tent that won't break the bank. If you're not sure you're going to be doing a lot of camping, and you don't want to spend a lot of money on a large family-and-friends size camping tent, this will provide plenty of fun and adequate comfort, and you can save your cash for other things that matter, like bicycles, beer, or gas money.

Value


The Midori 6 is a very affordable tent, and a great starter tent for anyone unsure if they're going to end up camping a lot. It is not the most durable or most weather resistant, but it'll suit most uses without breaking the bank.

Conclusion


The Eureka Midor 6 is a decent tent that was largely out-competed in this review. It had no major issues, but a few details in important categories forced it to fall behind the curve. It is simple and adequate, however, for most moderate-intensity uses.


Lyra Pierotti