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The Best Women's Ski Boots of 2019

You don't have sacrifice heat over performance; the Rossignol Pure Pro Heat skis top to bottom of the mountain.
Friday March 1, 2019
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Looking for the best women's ski boots you can buy in 2019? We've done the dirty work, researching over 50 models and narrowing it down the 6 most likely to succeed. Then we put in the actual work — the cold days, the good, the bad and the ugly snow conditions — to vet every boot we could get on our feet. We rated each on how well they carved groomers and handled choppy conditions. We also paid attention to how our feet felt to rate comfort and warmth.


Top 6 Product Ratings

Displaying 1 - 5 of 6
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Awards Editors' Choice Award Top Pick Award Best Buy Award   
Price $599.95 at REI
Compare at 3 sellers
$359.96 at Backcountry
Compare at 2 sellers
$499.99 at Amazon$359.96 at Amazon
Compare at 2 sellers
$700 List
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Pros All mountain performance, adjustable flex, integrated heatingAdjustable flex, comfortable, very responsiveVery responsive, energetic, comfortableCustomizable fit, loves carvingUser-friendly tech, programmable heat settings
Cons Lacks user guide for tech, charging cable is shortOverrated flex, not sturdy enough for +150L skiersWimpy power strap, overrated flexWimpy power strap, too stiff in some conditionsUncomfortable, difficult to get on
Bottom Line The "go anywhere, ski anything" boot that suits a wide range of abilities while keeping your toes toasty warm.A race-inspired design in a comfortable and easy to ski boot, the RX 110 LV is the perfect all-rounder suited for all mountain snow Goddesses.This boot is a great fit for anyone who wants to ski the entire mountain with finesse instead of speed.Aptly named, the Mach1 loves skiing at the speed of sound, or at least your version of it.This heated boot will have you happily shooshing around groomed terrain without ever thinking of cold feet again.
Rating Categories Pure Pro Heat Lange RX 110 LV - Women's Speedmachine 105 Mach1 105 LV X Pro 90W Custom Heat Connect
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Specs Pure Pro Heat Lange RX 110 LV -... Speedmachine 105 Mach1 105 LV X Pro 90W Custom...
Skier level recommended Intermediate to Advanced Intermediate to Advanced Intermediate Advanced to Expert Intermediate
Last Width (mm) 100 LV, 102 MV 97 LV, 100 MV 100 98 LV, 100 MV 100
Available Flexes 70, 100 80,100,110,120 85, 95, 105, 115 105 MV, 105 & 115 LV 80, 90
Weight (Per Pair, size 24.5) 8 lbs 12 oz 8 lbs 11.7 oz 8 lbs 8 lbs 6.4 oz 8 lbs 8oz
Shell Material Polyurethane Polyether Polyurethane Polyether Polyurethane
Number of Buckles 4 4 4 4 4
Buckles Microadjustable? Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Liner Material Merino wool + Thermic System Thinsulate Dual 3D Pro 3D Cork Fit Primaloft Women's C.A.S. UltraFit with Lambswool and Celliant Thermoformable foam
Liner Thermo-moldable? Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Binding Compatibility Alpine Alpine Alpine Alpine Alpine
Walk Mode? No No No No No
Size Range 22 - 27.5 22.5 - 26.5 22.5 - 27.5 22.5 - 27.5 23.5 - 26.5

1

Editors Choice


Rossignol Pure Pro Heat - Women's


Editors' Choice Award

$599.95
(20% off)
at REI
See It

93
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Performance - 40% 10
  • Comfort - 30% 9
  • Features - 10% 8
  • Durability - 10% 8
  • Warmth - 10% 10
Level: Intermediate, Advanced, Expert | Widths: 100 LV, 102 MV
All-mountain performance
Very comfortable
Adjustable heat
Adjustable flex
No quick start-up guide
Short charging cable

The unicorn of ski boots, the Rossignol Pure Pro Heat is the boot you always wanted to exist but thought was a thing of fairy tales. The integrated heating system was enough to get our attention, but it has much more to offer. It's a quick responsive boot with a very smooth, progressive flex. It will ski anything you ask it to and would like to do so at speed. At the same time, it is subtle enough to perform for finesse skiers. For that reason, this boot can work for anyone from a confident intermediate skier to an advanced or even expert level ripper. You can adjust this boot's flex. And, in its highest settings, it feels much stiffer than its advertise 100 flex.

It's not immediately obvious how to charge the batteries for the boot's heating system, but once you figure it out, it's pretty amazing. The price tag may initially induce sticker shock, but considering the cost of aftermarket boot heaters, it's actually quite reasonable. If you're a hard charger and suffer from chronically cold feet or ski in conditions when mere mortals hide in the warmth of a ski lodge; this is your boot! Toasty toes with no-holds-barred performance, this boot is a game changer.

Read review:Rossignol Pure Pro Heat

2

Best Buy


Nordica Speedmachine 105 - Women's


Best Buy Award

$499.99
at Amazon
See It

85
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Performance - 40% 9
  • Comfort - 30% 9
  • Features - 10% 7
  • Durability - 10% 7
  • Warmth - 10% 8
Level: Intermediate | Width: 100mm
Very responsive
Energetic
Comfortable
Wimpy power strap
Overrated flex

Have you ever experienced that moment of zen on the mountain? That time the stars aligned, your feet were warm, you chose the perfect goggle lens, the perfect pair of skis for the day, and you can perfectly envision your line spooling away from you down the fall line? We felt like this every run in the Nordica Speedmachine 105. This easy to flex boot provides a quick transfer of power from the front of the boot to the front of the ski. We found this boot to be quite lively and energetic. They are so responsive that, at times, we almost felt at one with our skis. The 110 flex felt softer than both the Tecnica Mach 1 105 and the Rossignol Pure Pro Heat so if you're looking for something burlier check those out. However, this boot performs excellently and fits like a glove out of the box (with a footbed of course).

This boot is built for the intermediate Goddess, or for chill advanced skiers. Our heavier and more aggressive testers found this model to be a little soft in steeps and rough terrain. However, when we reined in our bull in a china shop mentality and came back to zen, the SpeedMachine had our backs. The Speedmachine is for the woman who likes to take a read of her terrain and line choices and then proceed with precision over urgency.

Read review: Nordica Speedmachine 105

3

Best Intermediate All-Rounder


Lange RX 110 LV - Women's


Top Pick Award

$359.96
(40% off)
at Backcountry
See It

85
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Performance - 40% 9
  • Comfort - 30% 9
  • Features - 10% 7
  • Durability - 10% 8
  • Warmth - 10% 7
Level: Intermediate, Advanced | Widths: 97 LV, 100 MV
Very responsive
Adjustable flex
Comfortable
Not great for heavier frames
Overrated flex

All our testers agree, the new Lange RX 110 LV boots are fantastic at making snappy turns and love going fast! With the RX 110 LV, Lange upholds their reputation for high performing, ultra sensitive, and responsive ski boots. This year's updates include a new molding process that utilizes two different plastics. They are strategically placed to provide stiffness and torsional rigidity when you need it and leverage and flexible plastic when you have to get into the boot. We also love the smooth, plush liner that contours nicely to our ankles and heels. An asymmetrical tongue facilitates excellent power transfer from our shins to our skis. This updated boot is a much friendlier, more comfortable version. This is a great boot and is ready to accommodate a wide range of skiers.

The 110 flex feels softer than expected. But, using the adjustable flex screws, it's possible to tailor the cuff pressure to your ability. This very much felt like a twin sister to the Nordica Speedmachine 105 with one exception, this model has a shorter cuff, making it a more natural fit for smaller framed skiers.

Read review: Lange RX 110 LV

4

Most Race Inspired


Tecnica Mach1 105 LV - Women's



$359.96
(40% off)
at Amazon
See It

74
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Performance - 40% 8
  • Comfort - 30% 7
  • Features - 10% 7
  • Durability - 10% 7
  • Warmth - 10% 7
Level: Advanced, Expert | Widths: 98 LV, 100 MV
Easy fit
Customizable shell and liner
Loves to carve
Wimpy power strap
Too stiff in some conditions

This burly boot from Tecnica has always been a top scorer in our reviews. If you're the type to ski a boot that feels like driving a race car, this could be the boot for you. It strongly favors groomers, skis with a high-performance feel, and begs to be pushed further and faster on the corduroy. It's smooth and fast, and oddly enough, comfortable. Tecnica has found a very balanced blend of performance and comfort, and we're not complaining. We shredded the gnar and spent days sending it hard, concluding that this is a boot that wants to be pushed. Attention hard chargers who like to stay on-piste, this may be your new best friend.

If you're not accustomed to a stiff boot, this 105 may be a little spicy. It's not the best in choppy, bumpy or off-piste conditions, where it can buck you around. But it's earned its place among the best in an advanced to expert boot category.

Read review: Tecnica Mach1 105 LV

5

Best Tech


Salomon X Pro 90W Custom Heat Connect



$700 List
List Price
See It

63
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Performance - 40% 7
  • Comfort - 30% 3
  • Features - 10% 9
  • Durability - 10% 7
  • Warmth - 10% 10
Level: Intermediate | Width: 100mm
User-friendly tech
Programmable heat
Uncomfortable
Difficult to get on

We hope heated boots are the way of the future. Salomon's on board with the X Pro 90 Custom Heat Connect. Bluetooth technology makes programming warm feet from your phone unbelievably simple. We skied this boot everywhere in cold temperatures and are happy to report warm feet all day! This makes it easy to enjoy this boot's solid on-piste performance. It loves heading down wide open groomers with a head of steam.

Some of our testers had trouble with fit, even at room temperature, this was the most challenging boot to get on our feet. And it offers a rough ride when you head off-piste or into bumps. There seems to be a little confusion over whether this is an "all mountain boot" or an "on piste" boot. After putting it through extensive testing, we've concluded that Salomon designed it for the well-rounded intermediate skier who prefers groomed runs. If this sounds like you, read more to get the nitty-gritty details.

Read review: Salomon X Pro 90 Custom Heat Connect

6

Take A Pass


Apex HP-L Women's



$667.81
(5% off)
at Amazon
See It

40
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Performance - 40% 2
  • Comfort - 30% 4
  • Features - 10% 8
  • Durability - 10% 5
  • Warmth - 10% 7
Level: Intermediate | Width: 101mm
Innovative design
Clunky and bulky
Lacks ski performance
Expensive

We were all super excited to give this boot a try. Some of our testers are ski instructors and felt like this could be a good option for beginners or students who lacked mobility through their ankles. We were intrigued by the concept and design. Unfortunately, the boot fell short on its promises of comfort and performance.

Apex touts the comfort of this boot, but we actually found it to be less comfortable than most, even after having it custom heat molded. The soft boot is pretty easy to put on, but getting it into the hard plastic exoskeleton is like fighting an octopus. After such a struggle, it was disappointing that it performed so poorly on skis. We say, kudos to the innovation, but this boot gets a thumbs down.

Read review: Apex HP-L

Choosing a boot for your ability  skiing style  and foot shape can be a daunting and time-consuming process. Our field tests in the cold  the storms  and sunshine are meant to de-mystify some of this riddle.
Choosing a boot for your ability, skiing style, and foot shape can be a daunting and time-consuming process. Our field tests in the cold, the storms, and sunshine are meant to de-mystify some of this riddle.

Why You Should Trust Us


Our Expert Panel of reviewers consists of internationally recognized ski coach Meagan Jones and outdoor educator and guide Jessica Haist. Meagan holds both a Level III certification through the Canadian Ski Instructors Alliance and a certification through the Canadian Ski Coaches Federation. Additionally, she achieved her Level III Examiner's status with the Professional Ski Instructors of America after moving to the United States. Jessica holds a Master's Degree in Adventure Education from Prescott College in Arizona. Also with a Canadian background, she moved to the US from her native Toronto and now resides in Mammoth Lakes, CA, where she can be found climbing, backpacking, and mountain biking, in addition to skiing.

The first step in testing these boots was deciding what to look for. Three criteria were identified as essential to properly judge a ski boot - fit, ease of use, and performance. Next, it came down to extensive use on the mountain. We went to a lot of effort to examine how well each boot met the requirements of its stated purpose. For example, all mountain boots were skied on every type of terrain the mountain could offer up, while intermediate boots were skied on intermediate runs, but also advanced and beginner runs to look for where their limitations are.

Related: How We Tested Ski Boots for Women

The charging cables for both the Rossignol and Salomon heated boots are so short that we ended up charging them with the super accessible plugs on our kitchen counter.
Not quite as burly as her predecessor  the Lange RX 110 can still do it all. She's a little softer than the earlier version but makes zero apologies for being much warmer and comfortable.
Helpful hint: We found it useful to buckle these boots a little tighter on cold days a little looser on warmer ones. It should always feel like a firm handshake  not like your foot is in a vice.

How to Choose Women's Ski Boots


Choosing the right ski boot can be frustrating and time-consuming, but it's well worth the work. This process is vital because a boot is the foundation of everything that happens in skiing. Finding the balance between comfort and performance is paramount. Some of the first steps to determine what type of boot you want is to be realistic about your abilities and to figure out what features are essential to you.

Know what you want and stick to it. If you end up in a ski shop, finding someone you trust to help is critical. Do they know what they're talking about, or are they just trying to sell you what's left in inventory? Unfortunately, this is a particular problem for us ladies. Some ski shops have seasonal employees who think they know more than they actually do, and they can be pushy. Be prepared to have your own back.

Don't underestimate your knowledge and understanding of your own body, skiing style, and preferences. Sometimes we assume that a stranger who works in the industry knows more about what we want than we do. Arm yourself with the how to knowledge and trust your instincts, there's the perfect boot out there for everybody.

In this article, we will empower you with specifics to help know what to look for when shopping for a ski boot. We're going to dispel myths and make buying a new boot straightforward and simple. We'll also help you sort through the flashy marketing slogans to find the essential features that will make a difference for you. Read on to get you started on your epic boot buying journey.


Value


When we tested these boots on the hill, we didn't pay attention to price, just performance. Their scores reflect this. But we know that price matters, a lot. That's why we point out good values when we see them, awarding a Best Buy Award to the boot that provides the best performance to cost ratio. The Nordica Speedmachine 105 ran away with this prize, offering an outstanding value.

Remember to account for the features that are most important to you. If you really want a heated boot, for example, the Rossignol Pure Pro Heat offers boots with much better performance than the Salomon X Pro 90W Custom Heat Connect. The higher quality experience is worth a price difference of less than 10%.

From left to right  the Lange RX 110  the Rossignol Pure Pro Heat  and the Nordica Speedmachine 105. Winning our "Best" awards this year.
From left to right, the Lange RX 110, the Rossignol Pure Pro Heat, and the Nordica Speedmachine 105. Winning our "Best" awards this year.

How to find YOUR boot


Trust us — no major ski brand makes a bad boot. What's more important is which company makes a boot that fits your foot and best suits your skiing ability. If you can, demo boots before you buy one. Pick your top three choices and try them all in the same weekend.

If you don't have the time or geography to demo, try to get your feet in a pair. Your fit is a top priority! Ski boots should not feel like a comfortable pair of slippers. If they do, the boot is most likely too big. What feels good right now will likely pack out after a few ski trips and your feet will be swimming around inside those once wonderful new boots. A good fit should feel like a tight hug from your mum.

The right size ski boot should be comfortable  and snug enough to easily convey your body's actions to your skis  without cutting off circulation.
The right size ski boot should be comfortable, and snug enough to easily convey your body's actions to your skis, without cutting off circulation.

Sizing


Mondo Point System

Ski boot sizing is measured on the mondo point scale. You mondo point number is the length of your foot in centimeters. If your foot is 24.5 cms long, your mondo size is probably 24.5. Shops and boot fitters use a Brannock device to measure your feet accurately. At home, you can also trace your foot on a piece of cardboard, keeping the pen vertical against your foot to leave a slight border. Then, measure the length from the heel to the longest part of your foot and round off to the nearest half centimeter.

If you find the boot of your ski dreams, keep it fitting perfectly. Make a habit of closing your buckles to where you usually wear them and do the power strap up, so the velcro doesn't catch on anything other than itself. Practicing this habit ensures the plastic in your boot maintains the memory of your perfect fit.

If you are an advanced to expert skier, you may want to size down for a snug, performance fit. Most manufacturers make their boots available in half sizes like 27.5 and 28.5. If you fall in between these sizes, remember that it is much easier to make your boot bigger than smaller. It sounds weird, but it is easier to hollow out your liner to accommodate your foot than it is to pack it well enough to hold your foot. Your liner will also pack out over time regardless, so rounding down is recommended.

Be sure you invest in an actual ski sock. They are smooth to help your foot slide into the boot and are very thin to keep from packing out your boots any faster than you have to.

The Mondo Point system used in ski boots measures your feet in centimeters. This chart converts these centimeter measurements into American shoe sizes. This is just a guide. You or a boot fitter can take exact measurements.
The Mondo Point system used in ski boots measures your feet in centimeters. This chart converts these centimeter measurements into American shoe sizes. This is just a guide. You or a boot fitter can take exact measurements.

Last Width

Last width refers to the widest part of the ski boot at your forefoot. Ski boots come in low (93-98mm), medium (100-102mm), and wide volume lasts (102-106mm).


This number is not arbitrary, but it is a generalization. Manufacturers do not quantify the volume of their boots. They use the last width as a general guide. But the best thing to do if you're not sure about the volume of a boot is to try it on. Some boots are available in multiple volumes, denoted by LV (low volume), MV (medium volume), and HV (high volume). So if you're interested in a boot that seems too wide or narrow, see if the manufacturer makes another version.

Advanced  aggressive skiers who want to tackle the whole mountain in a range of conditions will want a boot with a stiffer  more supportive flex.
Advanced, aggressive skiers who want to tackle the whole mountain in a range of conditions will want a boot with a stiffer, more supportive flex.

Boot Stiffness


Now is the time to realistically assess your skiing ability and style. The flex rating of a boot indicates how hard it is to push the front of the boot forward, and the flex you need or want usually correlates to how advanced or aggressive you are. Height and weight can also affect the flex you choose. Heavier and taller skiers will flex a boot faster than those who are lighter and smaller-framed.

Flex ratings range anywhere from 30 to 130. Unfortunately, these numbers are NOT standardized across the industry. This is frustrating because a 90 flex in one brand may feel like 70 in a second boot and 110 in a third.

If you're still learning and stick to beginner trails  get a softer boot to ease you into the practice of flexing your boot beneath you.
If you're still learning and stick to beginner trails, get a softer boot to ease you into the practice of flexing your boot beneath you.

Beginners should choose a softer flex boot that will be more conducive to learning a new movement pattern. Learning how to articulate your ankle and pressure the ski from the front of the boot takes time and practice. Even most expert skiers could use training in this area. Beginner boots' flex ratings range from 60 to 70 and below, but again this is a generalization. If you are a little heavier, you may find yourself needing something with a higher flex rating.

The boots included in this review will suit a wide range of intermediate through expert skiers. Although many of these models come in softer and stiffer flexes, we tested mid-range models that are appropriate for the broadest range of women we can help.

Pro-Tip for Finding the Right Flex


The best way to find what flex you need? Put a boot on in a warm room or ski shop. Buckle the boot and the power strap. Now, press the tongue of the boot toward your toes. (This is very important as it pulls your heel back into the heel pocket). If you feel like the boot is flexing as if there are hinges at your ankles, then it's probably a good flex for you. A boot is too stiff when you have trouble pushing the tongue toward your toes and too soft if you feel like it collapses forward rather than letting you press it forward.

For the best fit  the power strap should be the tightest fitting part of your boot. You want the tongue of your boot to HUG your shin. This is the best way to ensure quick power transfer AND avoid the dreaded "shin bang".
For the best fit, the power strap should be the tightest fitting part of your boot. You want the tongue of your boot to HUG your shin. This is the best way to ensure quick power transfer AND avoid the dreaded "shin bang".

The Mighty Power-strap


The power strap. What is this?! It's the most under-appreciated performance enhancing part of the ski boot. I often see folks walking around and (gasp) even skiing with their power strap loose or even undone. This is a critical missing piece of finding your ski boot nirvana. The power strap should hold the tongue of your boot firmly against your shin. This gives you an instant transfer of power from the moment you flex your ankle forward into the front of the boot and prevents you from banging your shin on the front of your boot.

If you want a little extra comfort and performance (or suffer from chronic shin bang), adding an aftermarket Booster Strap to your boot is an excellent idea. This wonderful addition comes in various models, from beginner through expert. They are very easy to install, and most ski shops will do it for you if you don't feel like using a screwdriver.

The right boot should comfortably hug your foot. You can spend a day skiing without giving the right boot a second thought.
The right boot should comfortably hug your foot. You can spend a day skiing without giving the right boot a second thought.

10 Steps to Get the Perfect Fit


This advice comes directly from boot fitters and ski instructors — people who have likely put more boots on more people than any other humans on the planet. Ski boots used to be hard to put on, but this just isn't true in modern skiing. If you struggle to put a boot on (providing it hasn't been in the deep freeze of your car overnight), it isn't the boot for you. Try again.

A note on Ambient Temperatures
A warm boot is a soft boot. If it's hard to flex a boot forward in the ski shop, it's likely too stiff for you. It's unlikely that you will be skiing anywhere with temperatures matching that of a cozy retail store.
  • Step 1: Open all the buckles.
  • Step 2: Grab the tongue of the boot and pull it OUTSIDE the shell, or at least the side the buckles are on. This opens up the boot, and you should be able to see whether or not there's a footbed inside.

Pull the tongue to the outside of the boot so it helps separate the plastic folds  allowing more space for your foot.
Pull the tongue to the outside of the boot so it helps separate the plastic folds, allowing more space for your foot.
  • Step 3: Remove the manufacturer's footbed because it's probably garbage, and put in your own. They're available at most ski shops. They don't have to be custom made, but it's nice if you want to splurge.
  • Step 4: Point your toes like a ballerina, and slide your foot into the boot while holding the tongue out of the way as described above. P.S. this is much easier to do standing up.

Holding the boot open with the tongue still pulled to the outside  point your toes and slide your foot into the boot. This is sometimes easier standing up. Be sure to invest in a proper ski sock - they're smooth and tend to slide into the liner easier than a cotton athletic sock.
Holding the boot open with the tongue still pulled to the outside, point your toes and slide your foot into the boot. This is sometimes easier standing up. Be sure to invest in a proper ski sock - they're smooth and tend to slide into the liner easier than a cotton athletic sock.
  • Step 5: Adjust the tongue so that it fits around your shin and isn't all jacked up on the plastic.
  • Step 6: Starting at the top, close both buckles to the loosest position. Your leg should not feel like it's in a vice.
  • Step 7: Grab the power strap and snug the tongue of your boot to your shin so you can't see any room between your sock and the padding.

With the top two buckles secured just enough to close the boot  grab your power strap and snug the tongue of the boot onto your shin. This should feel like a firm handshake  there should be no space between your sock and the padding on the tongue. This is meant to be the tightest fitting part of your boot.
With the top two buckles secured just enough to close the boot, grab your power strap and snug the tongue of the boot onto your shin. This should feel like a firm handshake, there should be no space between your sock and the padding on the tongue. This is meant to be the tightest fitting part of your boot.
  • Step 8: Now your top two buckles will feel loose, tighten them, but they should still be finger tight (meaning that you're not wrenching on them).
  • Step 9: Stand up. (No we didn't forget about the other two buckles, we'll get to those.) Now press the tongue of the boot toward your toes. This pulls your heel back and makes room in your toe box.
  • Step 10: Close the two buckles on top of your foot.

After tightening the top two buckles  and BEFORE securing the last two on the foot use your shin and ankle to press the tongue of the boot toward your toes. This will push your heel back into its "pocket" and make more room for your toes.
After tightening the top two buckles, and BEFORE securing the last two on the foot use your shin and ankle to press the tongue of the boot toward your toes. This will push your heel back into its "pocket" and make more room for your toes.

You're done! Remember, always tighten your boot top to bottom. You should get the power-strap tighter than any other part of the boot. If this is not the case, this boot probably doesn't fit you. Consider trying on boot with a different last, or widest point.

The better the fit  the better the ski day. Getting your liner custom molded is worth the time and money spent. You get the side benefit of getting to know your local experts as well.
The better the fit, the better the ski day. Getting your liner custom molded is worth the time and money spent. You get the side benefit of getting to know your local experts as well.

Customizing Your Boots


Enlist the help of a professional boot fitter. They're geniuses, and we don't know where we'd be without them. All the boot liners in this review (minus the ones wired with heating systems) are meant to be baked in a special oven and heat-formed to your foot.

Find a boot fitter at your favorite or most often visited ski town. If there is a problem with fit, it's going to become apparent when you're skiing, and that's when you'll want it remedied. Stick with the same boot fitter as long as they're good. They already know what work they've done, and what has or hasn't worked in the past.

Professional boot-fitters have been known to work magic. They know all the customizable features of your boot and liner, including canting and micro-adjusting buckles, inside out and can make your boot fit like a glove.

P.S. Consider adding an aftermarket footbed to EVERY ski boot. Most companies assume the consumer will do this and they supply a flimsy, useless piece of foam that gives you zero support.

Time to get your boots and head to the hills!
Time to get your boots and head to the hills!

Conclusion


Buying new ski boots can be an expensive, time consuming and confusing process. Trust your instincts and own up to what you like and where you want to ski. If you don't love skiing bumps or off-piste, take that into consideration. If you do, make sure you get a boot that does too. After all, maybe you're not looking for an all-mountain boot. Maybe you want on on-piste machine that's great at groomers. Regardless, there IS a boot out there that will suit you perfectly. And we want to help you find it.


Meagan Jones and Jessica Haist