The world's most in-depth and scientific reviews of gear

Best Bike Saddle of 2021

The Scoop Pro is an ultra-lightweight road racing saddle.
Photo: Nick Bruckbauer
Monday December 14, 2020
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Our team of cycling specialists spent the last seven years testing nearly 30 of the best bike saddles and recently purchased 12 of this year's top models for our latest round of head-to-head comparisons. From casual fitness rides to urban bike commutes to grueling mountain ascents, our crew faced many of the same riding scenarios you might encounter. After many months in the saddle, we rated each model across five performance metrics to help you identify the features most important to you. Whether you're seeking a lightweight racing model with a sleek and slim profile, an anatomic design with maximum pressure relief, or an all-around balance of comfort and performance, we've got you covered.

Top 12 Product Ratings

Displaying 6 - 10 of 12
 
Awards   Best Buy Award   
Price $160 List$118.03 at Amazon$39.95 at Backcountry$45 List$119.00 at REI
Compare at 3 sellers
Overall Score Sort Icon
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Pros Comfortable, great performance, valueDurable, lightweight, longer than averageCompetitive price, versatile design, comfortable, durableComfortable, highly cushioned, pressure relief channelDurable, comfortable, classic style
Cons Not versatileSynthetic suede Microtex running down center of saddleHeavy, not as stiff as racing saddlesHeavy, bulky, low performanceMaintenance intensive, long break-in time, heavy
Bottom Line Aggressive yet comfy road rides are in store with this model, plus a few sideways glances due to its unique lookA lightweight racing saddle for the most aggressive ridersA comfortable balance of stiffness and cushioning, at a price that can't be beatA highly-cushioned saddle with a soft and flexible shell that is ideal for cruisingGo old school with this durable leather saddle, but know it comes with maintenance duties
Rating Categories Specialized Power Expert Fizik Arione WTB Speed Serfas Dorado Brooks England B-17
Comfort (30%)
8
8
8
8
6
Performance (30%)
9
8
7
4
5
Versatility (20%)
5
6
9
5
5
Durability (10%)
7
8
8
6
8
Weight (10%)
8
8
4
4
2
Specs Specialized Power... Fizik Arione WTB Speed Serfas Dorado Brooks England B-17
Dimensions L 240 mm, W 155 mm L 300 mm, W 130 mm L 270 mm, W 145 mm L 280 mm, W 165 mm L 280 mm, W 174 mm
Weight (grams) 238 g 241 g 379 g 382 g 537 g
Target Use (mountain, road, etc.) Road, Triathalon Road, Mountain, Cyclocross Mountain, Road, Cyclocross Road Road, Commuting, Touring
Rail Material Titanium Kium Alloy Steel Chromoly Steel
Seat Cover Material Synthetic Microtex Synthetic Soft Feel Microfiber Leather
Shell Material Carbon Nylon, Carbon Plastic Dual Density Foam None, Tensioned Leather
Anatomical Cut Out or Channel Yes, full cut out No Yes, groove Yes, full cut out No

Best Overall Road Bike Saddle


Fabric Scoop


Fabric Scoop
Editors' Choice Award

$134.73
(25% off)
at REI
See It

86
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort - 30% 9
  • Performance - 30% 9
  • Versatility - 20% 7
  • Durability - 10% 8
  • Weight - 10% 10
Dimensions: L 282 mm x W 142 mm | Weight: 195 g
Super lightweight
Comfortable padding
Carbon rails
No pressure relief cut-out

With its simple low profile design, lightweight carbon fiber rails, and comfortable dense padding, the Fabric Scoop Pro is earns our top overall ranking. The Scoop Pro scores well across the board in nearly every rating metric and does so with one of the lightest weights in our lineup, thanks to its minimalist design and carbon fiber rails. Its lightweight performance doesn't mean sacrificing comfort, though, as its flexible base and soft foam padding make a comfortable combination. While the Flat profile model we tested is intended for a more aggressive riding position, Fabric also makes the same model in Shallow and Radius profiles for neutral or more upright riding positions. Most of Fabric's saddles are available in all three shapes to suit your individual riding style.

While our testers thought the Scoop Pro is a comfortable saddle, it does not have a full cut-out or pressure relief channel like what is found on other models, like the Selle SMP Pro. While it does have a small relief channel at the tail of the saddle that is useful when you're riding in an aggressive position, riders looking for more anatomic relief will likely find better options elsewhere. The Scoop should be on your list for riders looking for a lightweight, high-performance saddle for racing or aggressive riding.

Read review: Fabric Scoop

Excellent Value Short-Nose Design


Prologo Dimension


Prologo Dimension
Best Buy Award

$111.98
at Amazon
See It

80
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort - 30% 9
  • Performance - 30% 8
  • Versatility - 20% 5
  • Durability - 10% 9
  • Weight - 10% 10
Dimensions: L 245 mm, W 143 mm | Weight: 191 g
Very lightweight
Comfortable
Anatomic relief channel
Unique design not as versatile

The Prologo Dimension provides excellent value with its comfortable and unique short-nose design and one of the most reasonable prices for an ultralight performance saddle. With just the right amount of padding in just the right places, a generous anatomic relief cutout, and a unique shape that encourages an aggressive riding position, this saddle makes a great option for road racers or fast riders. It is one of the lightest saddles we've ever tested and has a simple design and high-quality construction.

This saddle is a lightweight racing machine, and so it may not be as versatile across other riding disciplines. Its performance-oriented shape is not as comfortable in more upright or casual riding positions, and its stiff shell material and thin, dense padding are not as forgiving on offroad pursuits. But for aggressive riders looking for an ultralight option without breaking the bank, the Prologo Dimension is hard to beat.

Read review: Prologo Dimension

Best Bang for the Buck


WTB Speed


WTB Speed
Best Buy Award

$39.95
at Backcountry
See It

75
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort - 30% 8
  • Performance - 30% 7
  • Versatility - 20% 9
  • Durability - 10% 8
  • Weight - 10% 4
Dimensions: L 270 mm, W 145 mm | Weight: 379 g
Comfortable padding
Moderate pressure relief
Very low price
Heavier than average weight
Has some exposed stitches

The WTB Speed saddle features an ideal blend of supportive yet comfortable padding, middle-of-the-road dimensions that fit most riders, and an amazingly low price in the Steel rail version that we tested. Offering a classic shape with a slight rise at the tail and an anatomical pressure relief groove, the Speed has a versatile design that would be equally capable on road bikes, mountain bikes, cruisers, or a hybrid version of these styles. The synthetic cover is durable, and a tough rubberized scuff guard at the rear of the saddle further enhances its potential longevity.

While it may not win over the weight weenies with a measured weight of 379 grams, you would be hard-pressed to find a better saddle in this price range. Riders looking to save approximately 35 grams can opt for the lighter Cromoly rail version at an additional cost. Many other inexpensive saddles lack durability and quality construction or are overly cushy without providing much support or responsiveness, but the WTB Speed bucks those trends. If you're looking to replace a worn-out saddle or replace your stock seat with something more comfortable, this is an excellent, affordable option.

Read review: WTB Speed

Best for Anatomic Relief


Selle SMP Pro


Selle SMP Pro
Top Pick Award

$249.00
(8% off)
at Amazon
See It

78
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort - 30% 7
  • Performance - 30% 9
  • Versatility - 20% 8
  • Durability - 10% 9
  • Weight - 10% 5
Dimensions: L 278 mm, W 144 mm | Weight: 344 g
Huge anatomic relief cut-out
Comfortable in a variety of positions
High-end materials
Expensive
Maybe not suitable for all bodies

The Selle SMP Pro is one of the boldest and most uniquely designed saddles in our bunch and earns high accolades for its distinctive full-length cut-out. Riders typically suffering from soft tissue pain or numbness will certainly appreciate one of the most aggressive cut-out designs on the market, with a firm elastomer foam padding and a carbon-reinforced nylon shell that support the sit bones. The design took a bit of adjustment and tinkering before getting used to it, but after getting it dialed in with a few rides, it was hard to go back to a standard design. This seat also features a downturned nose that mitigates the risk of surprise bottom-bashing and serves as a nice platform for adjusting your riding position or sliding fore or aft with changing terrain.

While this model provides tremendous anatomic relief, it may not be for everyone. The revolutionary cut-out design means that the bulk of your weight is supported over a smaller surface area, potentially leading to uncomfortable pressure points, especially if your anatomy doesn't perfectly align with the saddle's size and shape. Our testers also found it challenging to correctly adjust and position it for a comfortable riding position with its heavily sloped fore to aft profile. Once we did, we appreciated the versatility to comfortably move around to a variety of seated positions. This also isn't the lightest saddle in our lineup with its high-end materials, but still manages to weigh in at a respectable 344 grams and is certainly worth checking out for riders looking for the ultimate in pressure relief.

Read review: Selle SMP Pro

Best for Cruising


Fizik Aliante Gamma Kium


Fizik Aliante Gamma Kium
Top Pick Award

$109.32
(16% off)
at Amazon
See It

82
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort - 30% 8
  • Performance - 30% 8
  • Versatility - 20% 9
  • Durability - 10% 9
  • Weight - 10% 7
Dimensions: L 265 mm, W 142 mm | Weight: 257 g
Supportive
Reasonably affordable
Comfortable padding
Rounded profile less suitable for racing

The Fizik Aliante Gamma Kium is our go-to saddle for more casual riding and mid-distance slogs. The rounded shape of the midsection is intended to better suit riders with less flexibility who tend to have more pelvic rotation during riding. It also has a central sweet spot with just the right density padding and a flexible carbon layer along the center of the nylon shell that nicely cushions and dampens the ride. It is not uncommon to find this saddle as the original stock equipment on some highly-regarded road bikes.

While our testers certainly appreciated this saddle's comfortable design, some riders looking for a pressure relief channel will likely need to look elsewhere. This model's rounded shape can buildup pressure or pain on the soft tissues, especially on longer rides. Likewise, racers or faster riders looking for a flatter platform for a more aggressive riding position may prefer the Fabric Scoop Pro Flat. For a general workhouse saddle that can meet the full range of road pursuits for most riders at a pretty accessible price, the Aliante Gamma Kium is a solid choice.

Read review: Fizik Aliante Gamma Kium

Left to right: Fizik Aliante Gamma Kium, Prologo Dimension, Serfas...
Left to right: Fizik Aliante Gamma Kium, Prologo Dimension, Serfas Dorado, Fabric Scoop Pro Flat, Selle SMP Pro, Brooks Cambium C15 Carved, WTB Speed Comp (old version)
Photo: Nick Bruckbauer


Why You Should Trust Us


Our lineup of bike saddles was put through the wringer by the rear ends of our gear testers Nick Bruckbauer and Ryan Baham. Both all-around athletes and avid outdoorsmen, Nick likes to spend his evenings and weekends grinding away in the hills above Santa Barbara, CA, and Ryan enjoys all manners of road cycling from causal after work pedals, quad busting climbs, and the occasional century ride.

After spending hours researching the top-performing products on the market, our testers put together a solid lineup of saddles and hit the road for some intense head to head testing. From short commutes to fast fitness rides, long cruises to grueling climbs, and blazing fast descents, we put these saddles through the wringer in all sorts of riding conditions.

Related: How We Tested Road Bike Saddles

Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge

Analysis and Test Results


After dusting off the bike tools in our home workshop, we began tinkering with our bikes and the group of saddles to get ready for the miles ahead. Each model was mounted on different bikes, adjusted for optimum setup, and tested by multiple riders with different body types and riding styles to gain multiple opinions and perspectives. We also analyzed these products' structure and design to better understand their design, materials, and construction. Below, we evaluate each saddle through our five rating metrics, including comfort, performance, and versatility through a range of speeds, terrains, and riding positions, and finally, weight and durability.

Related: Buying Advice for Road Bike Saddles

Value


We realize that cycling can be an expensive sport. While some riders are looking for the best possible products, no matter the cost, other riders are looking for a reasonable balance of solid performance and a fair price. Options we've presented range in list price from below $50 to over $250, so there's likely a good choice out there for any budget. The WTB Speed Steel stands out with very respectable scores across the board at an amazingly low price, leading the charge for WTB with their impressive range of reasonably priced saddles. Other solid options are the Fizik Aliante Gamma Kium or the Fabric Scoop Pro, both very high-end models with middle of the road price tags.


Comfort


Let's face it; comfort is perhaps the most important attribute for any rider spending any decent amount of time in the saddle. Without at least a reasonable level of comfort, a saddle's weight, durability, and other attributes almost become irrelevant and can force you back home to the recliner before you know it. We also must recognize that every rider, their anatomy, and their riding style are all individually unique, and this can give different riders vastly different opinions of the same seat. We sought out to find a consensus in opinions among our differently shaped testers because of this subjectivity. We looked to identify which saddle shapes, sizes, and design features favor or oppose certain riding styles or rider preferences.


One of the most comfortable saddles we tested is the Fabric Scoop Pro Flat. Its simple design with a flat seating platform, nicely rounded corners (viewed from the top), and comfortable plush padding make it ideal for racers or faster riders frequently in more aggressive riding positions. More casual riders with neutral or more upright riding positions who appreciate the sleek design and lightweight comfort of the Scoop Pro may be good candidates for the slightly more rounded Shallow or Radius profiles of this saddle. Likewise, riders with neutral or upright riding positions will likely also appreciate the rounded profile and Twin Flex technology that combines multiple carbon layers in the Fizik Aliante Gamma Kium.

The wide, flat rear seating platform of the Scoop provides a nice...
The wide, flat rear seating platform of the Scoop provides a nice supportive base, especially when in a more aggressive riding position.
Photo: Nick Bruckbauer

Another model that stands out uniquely is the Selle SMP Pro, with its full-length anatomic cut-out, providing tremendous pressure relief to the delicate parts of your undercarriage. Riders looking for relief from numbness, tingling, or painful pressure in their vital areas will appreciate this design. The potential drawback with the aggressive cut-out is that it leaves a smaller, very firmly padded surface area for your sit bones to rest on, potentially leading to uncomfortable pressure points. On their website, Selle recommends this saddle for riders with pants sizes L to XXL (USA sizes 34-39), and our testers found that smaller riders can experience discomfort if their anatomy doesn't correctly align with the smaller seating platforms.

The downturned nose and extreme sloping shape of the SMP Pro...
The downturned nose and extreme sloping shape of the SMP Pro compared to a more traditionally shaped saddle.
Photo: Nick Bruckbauer

While some of our comfort-oriented bike saddles with thicker padding were certainly quite comfortable on shorter cruises, we began to notice the lack of stiffness and support on longer or faster rides, which ultimately made the ride feel imbalanced and a little uncomfortable. A thickly-padded seat like the Serfas Dorado would make be an excellent option for your beach or neighborhood cruiser, but most likely isn't going to go on your road bike for faster training or racing. Striking a nice balance of comfortable plush padding and an anatomic relief cut-out without feeling too squishy or being too heavy, both the Specialized Power Expert and the Prologo Dimension would be good options for all-around riding.

The thick cushioning of the Dorado (rear) is much heavier and...
The thick cushioning of the Dorado (rear) is much heavier and bulkier than on other high-performance saddles.
Photo: Nick Bruckbauer

The Brooks England B-17 surprised us with its high level of comfort, achieved using tensioned leather and no padding - it's no wonder Brooks has been in the bike saddle business since 1882. The Brooks surprise goes to show that the answer to a sore bottom isn't always more padding - sometimes the answer is just more time in the saddle, particularly if you're new to riding or it's early in the season. Our testers found that the rubbery shell material found on the Brooks Cambium C15 and the Cambium C15 Carved All-Weather don't quite stack up to the comfort of the more traditional B-17. Despite the Brooks models' classic style and historic success, we found that our testers preferred the modern shapes and high-performance materials used in most newer styles.

The Brooks Cambium C15 Carved (left) and B-17.
The Brooks Cambium C15 Carved (left) and B-17.
Photo: Nick Bruckbauer

Performance


The level of performance offered by a bike saddle is largely dependent on its shape, padding, and shell stiffness. A road bike saddle must provide a stable platform from which the rider can achieve and maintain an optimal body position to transfer power to the pedals. The right balance of padding and stiffness is necessary to optimize power transfer without wasting energy or compromising efficiency. Having too much padding and too little stiffness means that energy can be absorbed and wasted with each pedal stroke. Having too little padding and too much stiffness can compromise comfort and accelerate the onset of fatigue.


The shape of the saddle also impacts performance. Traditional thinking is such that a relatively flat saddle with a long nose, such as the Fabric Scoop Pro Flat, offers the best power transfer. However, some newer saddles such as the Specialized Power Expert and Prologo Dimension diverge from that trend with a short chopped nose, wider tail, and deep cut-out, and still manage to perform quite well. A more traditionally shaped saddle like the Fizik Aliante Gamma Kium with its rounded shape also manages to rank well in this category thanks to its Twin Flex technology that optimizes stiffness.

The Prologo dimension with its short nose, wide tail, and generous...
The Prologo dimension with its short nose, wide tail, and generous anatomic relief channel.
Photo: Nick Bruckbauer

One of the biggest surprises in this category was the Selle SMP Pro, with its unique shape and downturned nose that helped power transfer in various riding positions. Its rigid carbon shell and curved front to back profile allow for versatile body positioning and provide a solid anchor to direct power into the pedals with minimal energy loss. Its wide rear platform also provides a steady base for those long grinding efforts, while the narrow nose is ideal for more aggressive pushes.

The SMP Pro provides a solid platform for efficient power transfer...
The SMP Pro provides a solid platform for efficient power transfer in a variety of riding positions.
Photo: Nick Bruckbauer

Versatility


While many high-level cyclists own multiple bikes and participate in several cycling disciplines, most amateur riders likely have one bike they use across any road riding pursuits. In our versatility testing, we focused on the major road pursuits: cruising (the seasonal century ride and long, slow training miles), sprinting (crits and single-day road races), climbing (grinding out categorized climbs), and touring (we're talking panniers, sabbaticals, Gofundme campaigns). The more versatile a saddle is, the more likely you will be happy using it for multiple disciplines.


We found the Fizik Aliante Gamma Kium to be one of the most versatile models in our lineup, scoring alongside the Selle SMP Pro. Both offer excellent power transfer and comfort while tearing it up out on the flats, making grinding hilly ascents, or blazing down some hair-raising descents. Their narrow noses allow you to aggressively kick from down in the drops, and they have just enough padding not to overwhelm you while sitting in a group in cruise mode. Our testers also loved the Terry Fly Ti for more intense efforts, with its long, narrow nose that allows the rider to get small down in the drops and its supple padding that comfortably facilitates those non-epic efforts.

The ideal density foam with Twin Flex shell technology of the Gamma...
The ideal density foam with Twin Flex shell technology of the Gamma Kium provides a nice blend of comfort and performance across a wide variety of riding conditions.
Photo: Nick Bruckbauer

Another good option in this category is the WTB Speed Steel with its classic shape, an ideal blend of plush comfort and stiffness, and a lightweight price tag. This seat is comfortable enough to go on a beach cruiser, stiff enough to go on your road bike, and affordable enough to grab more than one.

Durability


Our testers certainly put these saddles through the wringer - riding through dirt, mud, rain, snow, and sunshine - and easily survived the abuse of our testing period. The differences we've identified are primarily related to the product materials, design, or construction, and how they impact each product's perceived durability. When we put these saddles through the elements, baking in the sun on the roofs of our cars, or making accidental contact with the pavement a few times, we didn't manage to break any rails or tear any shells on any models.


While most of the saddles in our lineup are high-quality products, there are certainly a few models that stand out positively for their high-end materials and quality construction. The Fizik Aliante Gamma Kium receives high marks with its Microtex cover material, while the Selle SMP Pro stands out with its leather cover and quality construction. The Fabric Scoop Pro has simple, clean construction and high-end carbon fiber rails. The Terry Fly Ti comes in just a bit behind the others because its cover was bound to the shell with a simple glue and came apart after the smallest bit of half-hearted picking.

The Terry Fly's cover is secured to the shell with glue, which means...
The Terry Fly's cover is secured to the shell with glue, which means it can more easily separate.
Photo: Ryan Baham

Weight


Overall bike weight is significant for bike racers, where a few hundred grams on a long climb can mean the difference between first and second place. For the rest of us mere mortals, the overall weight can affect the handling, as well as our motivation at the end of a long day in the saddle. At OutdoorGearLab, we weigh all of our test products ourselves and compare them to the manufacturer claimed weight. Some saddles came in above or below the claimed weight, but all were within a few percent, without any glaring inaccuracies.


Highlighting our group are the Fabric Scoop Pro and the svelte Prologo Dimension, both clocking in under 200 grams. The Scoop achieves its impressively low weight in part by using carbon rails and cutting out a lot of the extra padding. In contrast, the Dimension achieves a featherweight stature with its smaller overall dimensions. As a rule of thumb, as a saddle's weight goes down, the price goes up. An exception to this is the Selle SMP Pro, which is on the pricier side and the heavier side, thanks to its unique design. However, even the SMP Pro comes in a carbon rail version that will drop another 50 grams if you're willing to fork over about $2 for each excised gram.

The solid construction and carbon rails make the Scoop a durable...
The solid construction and carbon rails make the Scoop a durable option and one of the lightest we've ever tested.
Photo: Nick Bruckbauer

Not surprisingly, the Brooks saddles are among the heavier models in our lineup with their robust materials and construction, as are the Serfas models with their thick and luxurious padding. Keep in mind that the intended use of these saddles is not just racing. Brooks saddles have a classic style with long-lasting materials and construction, while the Serfas saddles are designed for comfort for shorter, non-aggressive rides. Each rider must balance the importance of weight with comfort, cost, and intended use.

The Brooks saddles are among the heaviest in our lineup with their...
The Brooks saddles are among the heaviest in our lineup with their thick, durable materials and burly construction.
Photo: Nick Bruckbauer

Conclusion


Selecting the right saddle for your bicycle can be a daunting process and perhaps painful if you end up spending too much time with the wrong product. The range of saddle styles, shapes, and intended uses is vast, and researching their design details, and marketing jargon can be utterly confusing. We've cut through a lot of the noise to bring you our straightforward assessment, carefully pointing out any flaws while highlighting the qualities that will be useful for most riders. We've analyzed 12 of the best, most popular models on the market and put them through the wringer to guide you to the perfect new saddle that's right for you.

Happy riding!
Happy riding!
Photo: Nick Bruckbauer

Nick Bruckbauer & Ryan Baham