Reviews You Can Rely On

Dalbello Quantum Asolo Factory Review

Lightweight touring ski boots that are worthy of your consideration for all sorts of expert-level backcountry skiing
Dalbello Quantum Asolo Factory
Photo: Backcountry
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Price:  $900 List | $899.95 at Backcountry
Pros:  Light, neutral fit, balanced uphill and downhill performance
Cons:  Questionable closures, flimsy liner
Manufacturer:   Dalbello
By Jediah Porter ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Oct 29, 2021
  • Share this article:
Our Editors independently research, test, and rate the best products. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Learn more
63
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#3 of 14
  • Uphill Performance - 20% 8
  • Weight - 20% 10
  • Downhill Performance - 35% 3
  • Comfort and Fit - 10% 7
  • Warmth - 10% 6
  • Ease of Use - 5% 6

Our Verdict

The Dalbello Quantum Asolo is among the lightest one-third of our tested boots. In that subcategory, it skis better than most. The innovative shell design and closure systems make for an efficient, if unfamiliar, package. We wish the ankle zone were closer fitting, but this is a minor complaint in the grand scheme of things. The fit is largely neutral, the range of motion is impressive, and the downhill support is conducive to all but the most high-energy, high-speed skiing. Anyone with less-than-expert level downhill skiing skills will be a little overwhelmed trying to make any of these ultralight ski boots work for them.

Compare to Similar Products

 
Awards  Editors' Choice Award Editors' Choice Award Best Buy Award Best Buy Award 
Price $900 List
$899.95 at Backcountry
$899.95 at Backcountry
Compare at 2 sellers
$798.95 at Backcountry
Compare at 2 sellers
$799.95 at Backcountry
Compare at 2 sellers
Check Price at Backcountry
Compare at 2 sellers
Overall Score Sort Icon
63
69
67
62
57
Star Rating
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Pros Light, neutral fit, balanced uphill and downhill performanceExcellent downhill performance, lightweight, proven styleLight, free-pivot cuff, appropriate stiffness and flexBalanced up and down performance, wide/high volume fitLight, high volume fit, proven buckles and closures
Cons Questionable closures, flimsy linerModerate insulation, hard to get in and out ofCold, finicky transitionsSki/walk mode prone to issues, recall to past versionsHigh volume fit, compromised downhill performance
Bottom Line Lightweight touring ski boots that are worthy of your consideration for all sorts of expert-level backcountry skiingWhether a newcomer adjusting from the resort or a seasoned expert gunning for 100+ backcountry days a season, here is a top of the line shoe contenderBalanced, all-around ski touring boots that lean in the light-and-fast direction; these are optimized, probably, for what you like about the mountainsProven ski boots with modern updates and an overall performance profile that is optimized for the majority of bc riders; if you have high volume feet, even betterRelatively inexpensive lightweight touring boots that have more than satisfactory performance and a relatively wide fit
Rating Categories Dalbello Quantum As... Tecnica Zero G Tour... Scarpa F1 LT Scarpa Maestrale RS Atomic Backland Carbon
Uphill Performance (20%)
8.0
6.0
8.0
4.0
9.0
Weight (20%)
10.0
5.0
9.0
5.0
8.0
Downhill Performance (35%)
3.0
8.0
5.0
7.0
2.0
Comfort And Fit (10%)
7.0
8.0
8.0
7.0
8.0
Warmth (10%)
6.0
7.0
5.0
8.0
5.0
Ease Of Use (5%)
6.0
7.0
5.0
9.0
5.0
Specs Dalbello Quantum As... Tecnica Zero G Tour... Scarpa F1 LT Scarpa Maestrale RS Atomic Backland Carbon
Weight Size 26.5, pair 4 lbs 3 oz 6 lbs 0 oz 4 lbs 7 oz 6 lbs 5 oz 4 lbs 12 oz
Weight of One Boot Shell 0771 g 1119 g 0809 g 1080 g 0850 g
Weight of One Stock Liner, No Footbed 188 g 204 g 214 g 252 g 227 g
Weight of One Complete Boot, No Insole 0959 g 1323 g 1023 g 1432 g 1077 g
Range of Motion; Degrees 49 55 72 60 66
Binding Compatibility? Tech Only, or Tech and DIN AT standard, or Tech, DIN AT and DIN Alpine/WTR Tech only Tech and DIN AT Tech only Tech and DIN AT Tech only
Stated Flex Index Not reported 130 95 125 110
Stated Last width 99 mm 99 mm 102 mm 101 mm 98 mm
Alpine Wrap or Tongue Tongue Wrap Tongue Tongue Tongue
Shell Material Polyamide composite carbon Grilamid Grilamid, Carbon Core Carbon Grilamid Grilamid PA, carbon

Our Analysis and Test Results

The Dalbello Quantum Asolo Factory is a "one kilo" class shoe for all-around, fast-paced human-powered backcountry skiing. We found it to work really well, up and down. Our testers took it on powder days and huge ski mountaineering endeavors alike.

Performance Comparison


Good snow, balanced technique, careful ski selection and the...
Good snow, balanced technique, careful ski selection and the Dalbello Quantum combine to enable a fast-paced, high-energy day of big mountain skiing.
Photo: Jediah Porter

Uphill Performance


The free pivoting cuff and extensive range of motion make these boots tour uphill like a dream. They are very similar to other boots in the weight class and much better than anything 200 grams or more heavier. You choose these boots for their uphill performance. And they are a wise choice. The two-part cuff seems to make the ankle range of motion more free-flowing than other products in the category. Our only touring performance complaint is a minor one. The crampon-ready toe welt of the Quantum Asolo is relatively large, forcing the toe pivot point just a touch forward of what other boots are doing. Our high-volume, experienced testers could notice this subtle difference. The minor to major measures that manufacturers are taking to move the toe pivot point back make a tiny difference that adds up with each step. It's enough of a difference that the otherwise-competitive Dalbello Quantum stands out for slight loss of touring efficiency.

The Dalbello Quantum Asolo lands in a decidedly touring oriented...
The Dalbello Quantum Asolo lands in a decidedly touring oriented position on the backcountry ski boot spectrum. Nonetheless, it skis well.
Photo: Jediah Porter

Weight


We weighed a complete pair of Quantum Asolo Factory boots, in size 26.5, at four pounds, three ounces. These days, it is more conventional to report and compare ski boots (and all backcountry ski gear, for that matter) in weight per foot and in metric units. Circa "one kilo" is a benchmark for both boots and skis. One kilogram is the weight at which uphill and downhill performance can perfectly balance out, for boots and skis both. These Dalbello boots weigh 959 grams on our scale. This is great. You'll notice the weight savings as compared to those that weigh 1200g and above. The liner of the Dalbello Quantum Asolo Factory is nothing special. We tested with it and didn't suffer too much, but we can see how you might want to swap it out. In that case, you'll be comparing boot shell weights more than the weight of the entire boot. The Dalbello Quantum shell weighs 771g in size 26.5.

Downhill Performance


For the weight, and given the touring performance, these boots go downhill quite well. On our testing team, we tried lots of different downhill experiences. We had testers on the steep and serious terrain of the Grand Teton and with 110mm+ powder skis in deep and fast conditions. And everything in between. The Dalbello Quantum Asolo Factory not only "kept up", but largely excelled. Again, qualify our downhill observations with the weight and uphill criteria. This is a well-balanced boot. Fit will inform your downhill experience in the Quantum Asolo. The heel pocket is voluminous. The pair of tester boots we passed around did not get any customized boot fitting. You can fill in some of the heel pocket space in your own boots and reap even better downhill performance.

The two-part cuff of the Dalbello Quantum is its most unique...
The two-part cuff of the Dalbello Quantum is its most unique attribute. In practice it works well. These boots are easy to get on and off and tour very well.
Photo: Jediah Porter

Comfort and Fit


The Quantum Asolo Factory largely fits very neutrally. None of our testers couldn't "make it work" and none found it to fit perfectly, out of the box. The experience is consistent with many other touring boots; most wished it were a little roomier in the toe-box and a little snugger in the heel pocket. Given the common occurrence of these complaints, boot fitters are pretty familiar with making effective adjustments for you. The Quantum Asolo Factory shell materials are not super conducive to adjustments, but they can be done with care and professional level attention.

Our minor complaints with the Dalbello Quantum are its large crampon...
Our minor complaints with the Dalbello Quantum are its large crampon ledge and the fairly simple, squishy liners.
Photo: Jediah Porter

Warmth


The roomy, neutral fit and relatively thick liner (especially around your ankle and lower leg) make for reasonably insulated boots. Our lead tester made a January ascent and ski descent of the Grand Teton in wicked-cold conditions. His feet stayed warm the entire time, with careful layering and perpetual motion. Thicker, more robust touring boots will definitely be warmer than these. As compared, though, to boots of similar weight, the Quantum Asolo is relatively insulating. Fit them correctly, and you could readily press these into high-altitude, cold-weather function.

We beat these boots up and found them to be acceptable, but not...
We beat these boots up and found them to be acceptable, but not stellar. Some innovations enhance the experience without compromising usability or simplicity.
Photo: Jediah Porter

Ease of Use


The unique and innovative construction attributes of the Dalbello Quantum Asolo make it a little quirky to use. Some of those quirks are good, and some are more questionable. First, the cuff tightens and locks with one motion. Race-class ski mountaineering boots have long integrated this feature. Touring boots dabble with it without uniform adoption. We're glad for the Dalbello's one-move transition capability. To save weight (presumably…) Dalbello equips both the lower and upper closures with cord tensioners. They both stayed intact through the entirety of a fairly robust testing season. But they are both exposed, soft, and seemingly vulnerable.

The "one move" transition enabled by the Dalbello Quantum should be...
The "one move" transition enabled by the Dalbello Quantum should be standard by now, but it isn't.
Photo: Jediah Porter

The lower cuff closes with a dial to tighten the narrow cordage. It looks sort of like the more familiar Boa brand closure but isn't the same. The dial is harder to turn than the dials on other boots, and the dial needs to be cranked both closed and opened. The soft and flexible cordage, when loose, catches and snags more frequently than the cable on other boots. The upper cuff closes with thicker cordage secured by a ridged cam lock buckle and tensioned by a rear-of-boot lever. You need to adjust and tension the front, ridged, cam-lock every time you put the boots on.

If that cam lock is not fully closed (and it is easy to fail to close it all the way), the cord will slide, under a great deal of tension, through the ridged feature. Our cord shows signs of wear from this sort of rough (but not uncommon or abusive) use. We have to assume that more incidences of such abrasion could compromise the integrity of this cord. Field repair would be possible, but it would be difficult to generate the same sort of closure force with a field repair. The large crampon toe welt is secure and versatile. We've experienced or heard of no complaints about crampon security or compatibility.

Value


They aren't the cheapest boots in this class but aren't super expensive either. If it turns out that the corded closures hold up (and we'll keep testing to be sure) better than we anticipate, these will prove to be quite robust boots. For the weight. All lightweight gear breaks down faster than its heavier counterparts. This is simple physics. When we make comparisons of value, we generally compare to products with similar performance. We think these are a good value overall.

The Dalbello Quantum Asolo in action in Western Wyoming's Tetons.
The Dalbello Quantum Asolo in action in Western Wyoming's Tetons.
Photo: Jediah Porter

Conclusion


We love that more and more offerings are emerging in the lightweight backcountry ski gear category. Dalbello's Quantum Asolo is worthy of consideration and will be workable for a broad spectrum of human-powered skiers.

Jediah Porter

Ad-free. Influence-free. Powered by Testing.

GearLab is founded on the principle of honest, objective, reviews. Our experts test thousands of products each year using thoughtful test plans that bring out key performance differences between competing products. And, to assure complete independence, we buy all the products we test ourselves. No cherry-picked units sent by manufacturers. No sponsored content. No ads. Just real, honest, side-by-side testing and comparison.

Learn More