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Salomon QST Lumen 99 Review

A very energetic ski in powder and bumps, we wished it performed better on-piste and in crud.
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Price:  $650 List | $299.97 at Backcountry
Compare prices at 3 resellers
Pros:  Lively, quick for its size, master in powder
Cons:  Not super stable, flappy tips, gets thrown in crud
Manufacturer:   Salomon
By Renee McCormack ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Oct 16, 2019
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60
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#8 of 16
  • Stability at Speed - 20% 5
  • Carving - 20% 6
  • Crud - 20% 5
  • Powder - 20% 8
  • Playfulness - 15% 6
  • Bumps - 5% 5

Our Verdict

While the Salomon QST Lumen 99 was a far superior ski to previous Salomon iterations we'd skied, it just didn't stack up against the abundance of tough competitors. It did rise towards the top of the pile in the powder metric, and if we could just ski powder all day every day (yes, please) this ski would be a winner. It has fantastic flotation, and a sprightly way of making quicker turns in the fresh snow, rather than big mountain straight lines. Unfortunately, the reality is that we will always end up skiing a variety of snow conditions, and the Salomons aren't quite up to par in other types of terrain. And while they've also got very reactive rebound and love to get airborne, making them really fun in easy conditions, the confidence we lost in tougher situations tipped the scales against them.

Product Updates

Since our last test cycle with the QST Lumen 99, it's been granted some updates. Read below for more info.

October 2019


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Overall Score Sort Icon
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Star Rating
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Pros Lively, quick for its size, master in powderIncredibly versatile, easy to ski, fun and quick, only 92mm makes it nimbleGreat float in powder, playful, decent stabilityUnparalleled stability at speed, crud-buster, lends you strengthA blast to ski, easy to turn, relatively stable, fantastic in powder
Cons Not super stable, flappy tips, gets thrown in crudNot the perfect powder partnerMore expensive, slightly lumbering in bumpsVery pricey, prefers faster straighter linesNot perfect carvers, some deflection in crud
Bottom Line A very energetic ski in powder and bumps, we wished it performed better on-piste and in crud.One of the most versatile skis on the market, this new Volkl is a Goldilocks ski - strong enough to battle in the crud, but soft enough for lighter mellower skiers to bend it.A great choice for a West Coast woman who loves getting out in the soft snow.If you like to go fast and want a one-ski quiver, this ski is absolutely worth the extra funds.Ripping skis for ripping chicks, or those on their way to becoming one, so fun and flexible.
Rating Categories Salomon QST Lumen 99 Volkl Secret 92 Rossignol Soul 7 HD W Kastle FX95 HP Elan Ripstick 94 W
Stability At Speed (20%)
10
0
5
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
10
10
0
8
Carving (20%)
10
0
6
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
7
Crud (20%)
10
0
5
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
10
10
0
8
Powder (20%)
10
0
8
10
0
9
10
0
10
10
0
9
10
0
9
Playfulness (15%)
10
0
6
10
0
10
10
0
9
10
0
7
10
0
10
Bumps (5%)
10
0
5
10
0
9
10
0
8
10
0
8
10
0
9
Specs Salomon QST Lumen 99 Volkl Secret 92 Rossignol Soul 7... Kastle FX95 HP Elan Ripstick 94 W
Intended Purpose All mountain/powder All mountain All mountain powder All mountain stability All mountain play
Ability Level All Levels All Levels All levels All levels All levels
Available Lengths 153, 159, 167, 174, 181 149, 156, 163, 170 156, 164, 172, 180 173, 181, 189 156, 163, 170, 177
Shape 136-99-118 130-92-113 136-106-126 126-95-115 135-95-110
Waist Width 99 92 106 95 95
Radius 19 17.9 18 18 16.2
Rocker Tip and tail, camber underfoot Tip and tail, camber underfoot Tip and tail, camber underfoot Tip and tail, camber underfoot Tip and tail, cambered inside edge
Weight Per Pair (Pounds) 8.07 8.16 7.7 9.62 6.725
Construction Type Full sandwich Full sidewall Sandwich Sandwich SST sidewall
Core Material Poplar Beech & Poplar, multi layer Paulownia wood silver fir, beech, Titanal, fiberglass Tubelite wood
Tested Length 174 170 172 173 170

Our Analysis and Test Results

Updates to the QST Lumen 99


These skis have been redesigned. There is an updated sidecut meant to help make turning easier, and the tip to tail laminate is comprised of a carbon and flax fiber combo that Salomon calls C/FX . The new Powerframe Ti binding reinforcement runs underfoot from edge to edge, and there is a cork damplifier to absorb vibration in the tip of the ski without adding extra weight. Compare the updated ski in the first image below to the version we tested in the second photo.


We're linking to the most recent QST Lumen 99, but be aware that our review below refers only to our adventures on the previous version.

Hands-On Review of the QST Lumen 99


If you truly only go out on powder days, and you go back inside as soon as it starts to get tracked out, these skis would be a great choice. In that case, however, you'd probably just opt for a powder specific ski instead of an all-mountain which lacks versatility. If you know you'll be skiing on soft groomers, and enjoy making quick short turns with fun rebound energy, the Salomons do that well, too.

We loved skiing the Salomons in powder - this is where the Lumens shine!
We loved skiing the Salomons in powder - this is where the Lumens shine!

Stability at Speed


The Lumen's massive rockered tips make them the perfect powder hound, but they do not aide in stability. We found that the tips were constantly flapping around when we skied at speed on hard-pack or groomers, which is always a little unnerving, even if it doesn't necessarily point to real instability. However, we also found that they would chatter and skid out when we tried to push them in the steeps. One tester said she felt that up to a certain speed, they were OK, but they had a threshold past which they were dubious. There were a number of uncomfortable moments where they just didn't have the edge-hold we desired.

They didn't give us a solid foundation on which to go as fast as we wanted.
They didn't give us a solid foundation on which to go as fast as we wanted.

Carving


While they do have a nice rebound effect at the end of the turn, thanks to a consistent flex pattern along the ski, they just don't have the edge-hold capabilities in harder snow to feel confident setting an edge and riding it. They seem to want to make a shorter turn than their 19m radius would suggest, for those who appreciate quick turns. You may need to widen your stance to carve this ski properly, since the tips are quite fat and can get in the way!

The Lumens made a much zippier turn shape when set on edge than we expected from a 19m turn radius.
The Lumens made a much zippier turn shape when set on edge than we expected from a 19m turn radius.

Powder


This is where the Lumen shines her brightest. It is incredibly floaty - you can always see the big purple spatula tips soaring our in front of you, or if it's very deep you'll still see the waves of snow created by them. These are reassuring signs that you'll be staying on the surface! They love to make a short, bouncy turn in the fluffy stuff, which many of our testers appreciated. As opposed to the typical fat-ski arc of one turn in 300ft of powder, our lead tester tends to think you get more joy out of the snow if you're turning more often! This is also a preferable turn shape for those just building confidence in fresh snow. They were very maneuverable in the trees, and in quite deep snow (we skied them in up to 18").

Bouncing their way back to the surface of deep snow is what the Salomons are best at.
Bouncing their way back to the surface of deep snow is what the Salomons are best at.

Crud


Those big ol' spatula tips that make the Salomons perfect powder-eaters are their downfall in this metric, constantly being deflected and tossing their rider off balance. They just don't feel stiff enough to plow through choppy snow.

Playfulness


The exhilarating rebound it offers, particularly in a short, poppy turn, makes it a relatively playful ski. They also feel pretty lightweight, and it seems very easy to get them into the air. It's just that when we got them back down to the snow again, we weren't convinced they'd do as they were told. But their surprising agility, given their size and turn radius, definitely gave us a second thought.

We got a bit thrown around in the crud  but their quicker turns helped us out in the bumps.
We got a bit thrown around in the crud, but their quicker turns helped us out in the bumps.

Bumps


The Lumens startled us with their capacities in the moguls as well, mostly because they look like such lumbering brutes, but they turn with lightness and grace. Despite being 99mm under foot, and supposedly having a 19m turn radius, they are quick and responsive in the bumps. They are relatively forgiving in this terrain for the uninitiated.

Value


Sitting in the middle of our group of test skis in terms of price, we think the tag is set just about right. They're fun, and great in powder, but we also think there are other skis out there at similar costs that offer greater versatility.

Conclusion


A playful ski that thrives in powder, the Salomon QST Lumen 99 is a forgiving and fun option - just don't expect too much of it in other environments.


Renee McCormack