Hands-on Gear Review

Reebok Sprint 2.0 - Women's Review

Top Pick Award
Price:  $110 List | $76.97 at Amazon
Pros:  Comfortable for running, breathable.
Cons:  Unsupportive for heavy lifts.
Editors' Rating:   
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Upper:  Synthetic/mesh, rubber
Weight (oz/grams):  7.1oz / 201g
Heel to toe drop (mm):  3mm
Manufacturer:   Reebok

Our Verdict

Reebok Discontinued The Sprint 2.0 in January 2017

When most CrossFitters think of CrossFit shoes from Reebok, the Nano usually comes to mind first. While lesser known, the Reebok Sprint 2.0 consistently performed well during our tests. We loved the slimmer fitting toe box and more flexible sole compared to the Nanos and we've given it our Top Pick for Running WODs award. If you are looking for a shoe that can be used for everything the whiteboard throws at you, this shoe is almost perfect. In addition to sprints and longer runs, it was a stellar performer for rope climbs and quite comfortable for box jumps and double unders. The main area this shoe didn't impress us in was heavy lifting. It has a softer sole than traditional weightlifting shoes and it was hard to keep our weight situated on the back of our heels. We wound up dumping heavier weights due to coming forward onto our toes, but we didn't mind lifting in them with lighter loads. These shoes are a great choice for intense workouts that combine light to moderate lifts with running, jumping, or gymnastics. If you need a shoe that can handle heavier weights then check out our Editors' Choice winner, the Nike Metcon 4 - Women's.


RELATED REVIEW: Best CrossFit Shoes for Women of 2018

Our Analysis and Test Results

Review by:
Audrey Hammond

Last Updated:
Friday
September 18, 2015

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The Reebok Sprint 2.0 is marketed as a "WOD-friendly trainer." It has a stretch mesh and rubber upper with a heat-wicking lining, a 3 mm heel to toe drop and weighs 7.1 ounces (201 grams).

Performance Comparison


At first glance  this does not look like an impressive shoe with its understated design. But this shoe kept surprising us over and over as a solid performer in a variety of workouts  and we've given it our Top Pick for Running WODs award.
At first glance, this does not look like an impressive shoe with its understated design. But this shoe kept surprising us over and over as a solid performer in a variety of workouts, and we've given it our Top Pick for Running WODs award.

Weightlifting


The Reebok Sprint 2.0 isn't designed to handle heavy loads; this is not the pair to wear for one rep max attempts. The 3 mm toe drop combined with a soft sole forced us to come up onto our toes during our heavier lift attempts. If you want a shoe that can definitely stand up to some heavier work then check out our Editors' Choice winner, the Nike Metcon 3. The Metcon was our clear favorite for heavy deadlifts, cleans, and snatches. However, this model is a great shoe for metabolic conditioning workouts that include light lifting in combination with running or jumping movements.

One of our favorite workouts with this shoe included high reps of light deadlifts and double unders. The Reebok Sprint gave us just enough support on the deadlifts without being overly heavy or clunky for the jump rope.
One of our favorite workouts with this shoe included high reps of light deadlifts and double unders. The Reebok Sprint gave us just enough support on the deadlifts without being overly heavy or clunky for the jump rope.

Running


This model was the only shoe to score a 10/10 for running. Because it is a versatile shoe for CrossFit, we chose the Reebok Sprint 2.0 as our Top Pick for Running WODs. One of the perks of running in this shoe over any of the Nanos, specifically the Reebok Nano 2.0 - Women's, is the narrower toe box. The wide toe box on the Nano 2.0 feels sloshy, whereas we could trust our footing more with the Sprints, allowing us to push harder on our runs.

The Nano series (left) is notorious for having a wide toe box that some people  do not like. The Sprint (right) has a narrower fit at the toes which helps make it a better fit for running workouts.
The Nano series (left) is notorious for having a wide toe box that some people do not like. The Sprint (right) has a narrower fit at the toes which helps make it a better fit for running workouts.

Sensitivity


Trying to find the right sensitivity for a CrossFit shoe is always a challenge. You want enough cushion for running, and yet you don't want an overly soft sole. Squishy soles make it hard to feel where your bodyweight is situated on your feet during lifts. This shoe does a great job of bridging that gap. However, our Best Buy winner, the Nano 2.0, was slightly better in the sensitivity category. The sole on the Nano 2.0 is firmer than this model, which allowed us to get a better set up position during lifts compared to the Sprints.

Support


This shoe lacked the support we needed for our heavy lifts. One tester described the shoes as "tippy" when working on heavy deadlifts. The tippy feeling of the shoe comes from the narrow width around the arch. During lifting movements it is important to drive your knees out while powerfully screwing your feet firmly into the ground. The narrow sole lacked the support we needed for such a movement. The Reebok Lite TR - Women's has a more supportive width than this model as well as an over-the-ankle design.

The narrow width of the Sprint (left) at the arch combined with the soft sole make the shoe unsupportive for heavy lifts. The Lite TR (right) has a much wider sole as well as a firmer platform  making it more supportive for heavy lifting.
The narrow width of the Sprint (left) at the arch combined with the soft sole make the shoe unsupportive for heavy lifts. The Lite TR (right) has a much wider sole as well as a firmer platform, making it more supportive for heavy lifting.


Protection / Durability


Another area where this shoe pleasantly surprised us was during rope climbs. At first glance, it looks too light and minimal for good protection on the rope. However, there is a band of extra grippy material running diagonally along the sides of the shoe that really helped us dig into the rope and protect our feet from friction. We were also happy that the sole and the upper of the shoe didn't suffer any damage after sliding down the rope. The Reebok Nano 7.0 - Women's was also designed to stand up to the potential damage of rope climbs with the addition of Kevlar to the uppers. While the Kevlar upper does make the shoe durable, one athlete found them to be "slick as snot" and didn't feel as though she could trust her feet on the rope.

When purchasing a pair of shoes for CrossFit style workouts, take a look at the material of both the soles and the uppers near the instep of the shoe. Rope climbs are a standard part of these workouts, and the friction they generate is particularly hard on that area. If the midsole is too soft the rope can tear chunks away, quickly ruining your shoes. Extra rubber on the upper also gives you more purchase on the rope, making the climbs a little bit easier.

Breathability


We were very pleased with the breathability of this shoe. The thin, lightweight uppers allowed for great airflow even with the narrow band of extra rubber for rope climb protection. The supposed "heat-wicking lining" really does keep you cooler than other models out there. While you want the extra protection that a rubber upper provides, too much of it impedes airflow and leaves you with hot and uncomfortable feet.

The Sprint (left) has a helpful swath of grippy rubber on the side but it doesn't detract from the shoe's breathability. Comparatively  the extra cage of grippy rubber on the Nano 4.0 (right) makes it much hotter during workouts.
The Sprint (left) has a helpful swath of grippy rubber on the side but it doesn't detract from the shoe's breathability. Comparatively, the extra cage of grippy rubber on the Nano 4.0 (right) makes it much hotter during workouts.

Comfort


This shoe was one of our highest ranking shoes according to comfort. It has enough arch support and give in the sole to be worn on your feet all day. Shoes that are good for weightlifting typically do not have flexible soles. This model has enough flexibility to be a comfortable and versatile option for a broad spectrum of movements while still performing well at light weightlifting.

Ever tried doing planks in a conventional weightlifting shoe? The sole flexibility of this model allows for a variety of movements and this shoe also works well for light to moderate weights.
Ever tried doing planks in a conventional weightlifting shoe? The sole flexibility of this model allows for a variety of movements and this shoe also works well for light to moderate weights.

Best Applications


As our Top Pick for Running WODs, the Reebok Sprint 2.0 is clearly perfect for runs. Metabolic workouts that combine runs with other high intensity movements are this shoe's forte. Even if your workout calls for some light to moderate lifts thrown into the mix, the Sprint is up to the task. If you are really searching for the one shoe that can do all this plus handle heavy loads, then our Editors' Choice winner, the Nike Metcon 3, is the way to go.

This shoe is great for workouts that combine running and plyometrics or other jumping movements such as double unders.
This shoe is great for workouts that combine running and plyometrics or other jumping movements such as double unders.

Value


Retailing for $110, the Reebok Sprint 2.0 is situated right at the middle of the price range of the shoes we tested in this review. However, taking into consideration the overall versatility of this shoe, we do feel it is a good value. If you are hoping to spend less than a hundred dollars on your next pair, check out our Best Buy winner, the Reebok Nano 2.0. It is slightly less expensive than this model and is also a versatile and high-performing shoe.

Conclusion


The Reebok Sprint 2.0 is our new Top Pick for Running WODs. With a narrower toe box than the Nanos, our feet felt more stable during sprints. While we were comfortable with light to moderate weight lifts, we did not like these shoes for heavier attempts. The softer sole caused our weight to shift forward onto our toes versus allowing us to keep our weight further back. The soft sole has its advantages in other areas though. We loved how the bottoms of our feet were cushioned during plyometrics and double unders. We also appreciated the extra grippy material up the sides of the shoes during rope climbs. A long day of coaching also proved to be no problem for these shoes — they remained comfortable all day long, which is not something we could say about many other shoes out there.

Our Top Pick for Running WODs  these shoes were also versatile for most other movements we tested. However  we did not like lifting heavy in them.
Our Top Pick for Running WODs, these shoes were also versatile for most other movements we tested. However, we did not like lifting heavy in them.
Audrey Hammond

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