The world's most in-depth and scientific reviews of outdoor gear

Merrell Terran Ari Lattice Review

This sandal will keep you comfortable and looking good for miles during your city travels.
Top Pick Award
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Price:  $80 List | $44.99 at MooseJaw
Compare prices at 2 resellers
Pros:  Comfortable, lightweight, stylish
Cons:  Limited adjustability, not suitable for rugged applications
Manufacturer:   Merrell
By Joanna Trieger ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Jun 5, 2018
  • Share this article:
65
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#10 of 13
  • Comfort - 20% 9
  • Traction - 20% 6
  • Stability - 20% 6
  • Adjustability - 20% 4
  • Style - 10% 8
  • Adaptability - 10% 7

The Skinny

With a comfortable, contoured footbed, a simple adjustment system, and a style that's appropriate for the city, we loved the Merrell Terran Ari Lattice, our Top Pick for Urban Travelers. This is one of the least technical models we tested, so if you're planning on big hikes or hitting the water in your sandals, look elsewhere. It also only has one adjustment point (and only medium width sizes), so those with very narrow or wide feet may find that these don't fit well. But if you're seeking a lightweight, good-looking travel shoe for the average foot, the Terran Ari Lattice is a great option.

Those seeking all-terrain footwear that's still comfortable and stylish should check out our Editor's Choice winner, the Bedrock Cairn Adventure.


Compare to Similar Products

Our Analysis and Test Results

Our testers loved the comfort and simplicity of the Merrell Terran Ari Lattice. This is not a technical sandal, but for the urban adventurer who throws an occasional off-road walk into the mix, this is a solid choice. Read on to see if this is the right sandal for your needs, or if you should go for something with a little more technical capability.

Performance Comparison



Comfort


This sandal is one of the most comfortable we tested. With a cushioned microfiber footbed and straps that feel good against the skin, the Terran Ari Lattice felt broken-in immediately, and we never felt any hot spots develop throughout our weeks of testing.


We took the Terran Ari Lattice on some stout hikes, with and without heavy packs. This is not an ideal hiking shoe given its thin sole and lack of adjustable straps, but if you find yourself on an impromptu trail jaunt during your travels, this sandal is cushioned enough to keep you comfortable.

On mellow hikes  the Terran Ari Lattice's cushioned sole kept us comfortable.
On mellow hikes, the Terran Ari Lattice's cushioned sole kept us comfortable.

One reason we chose the Terran Ari Lattice as our Top Pick for traveling and city use is that when it came time to hop on a plane, this is the model we reached for. The cushy footbed and roomy straps make for a comfortable cruise through the airport, even when carrying a heavy pack. Going through security, we appreciate only having to loosen one strap, and these sandals are easy to slip on and off. By contrast, while we love the Chaco Z/Cloud 2, slipping them on and off at the airport — especially if your feet have puffed up a little from flying — is a pain.

Anything that can make airport security easier is a bonus. These sandals have just one simple adjustment point  so sliding them on and off quickly is a breeze.
Anything that can make airport security easier is a bonus. These sandals have just one simple adjustment point, so sliding them on and off quickly is a breeze.


The Terran Ari Lattice is a standout for comfort, but if you're looking for comfortable options that can handle more rugged applications, there are better options. Check out our Editor's Choice, the Bedrock Cairn Adventure, our Top Pick for Distance Hikers, the Chaco Z/Cloud 2, or our Top Pick for Adventure Travel, the KEEN Clearwater.

Stability


For a stable sandal, we look for a sole that supports our feet and keeps them securely in place, even on uneven terrain. The Terran Ari Lattice is not that sandal. While its sole does have some cushioning, overall it's pretty thin, so it didn't stop us from wobbling over rocks and roots. The straps at the front of this sandal don't adjust (more on that below), so for the narrow-footed, there is a ton of room for feet to slide around up there. The Merrell is fine for strolls on city streets but isn't stable enough to perform well on rough trails.


The Chaco Z/Cloud 2 has a thicker sole than the Terran Ari Lattice and is more contoured, so those with high arches may find the Chacos more stable. If you have lower arches or are looking for a zero-drop sandal with a thick, stable sole, check out the Luna Mono Gordo 2.0.

This floppy sole is lightweight and grippy  but it doesn't lend stability while tackling rough terrain.
This floppy sole is lightweight and grippy, but it doesn't lend stability while tackling rough terrain.

Traction


Given that this is not a technical sandal, we were impressed with the Terran Ari Lattice's performance in this area.


Merrell claims that its M Select GRIP outsole delivers "highly slip-resistant stability on wet and dry ground." We agree. We took these sandals romping over dirt trails, wet granite, logs, and duff, as well as city sidewalks and urban grass. The soles provided solid traction in all of these situations. Also, the Merrell's sole is thin enough that it can contour around objects, so while this isn't always great for stability (see above), it made us feel very grippy when walking on uneven rock surfaces. In this way, the Terran Ari Lattice is similar to the Bedrock Cairn Adventure. The one downside of the Merrell's sole is its shallow tread, which makes it less than ideal in technical situations, like navigating steep scree-covered trails.

The Terran Ari Lattice isn't a water shoe  but what kind of gear testers would we be if we didn't drag these sandals through a river or two? We were impressed by the sole's traction  even over wet rock  but the footbed was slippery in all conditions.
The Terran Ari Lattice isn't a water shoe, but what kind of gear testers would we be if we didn't drag these sandals through a river or two? We were impressed by the sole's traction, even over wet rock, but the footbed was slippery in all conditions.

In contrast to its sole, the microfiber footbed of the Terran Ari Lattice provides minimal traction, so our feet tended to slide around. Especially for those with narrow feet, the unadjustable straps won't hold feet in place in the front of the sandal, so this poor footbed traction is a significant downside.

Adjustability


This shoe received one of the lowest scores in our test group in this category. The Terran Ari Lattice has only one adjustable strap, and this, more than any other factor, limits this sandal's ability to perform in technical situations. The strap that crosses from the inner arch to the outer ankle can be loosened or tightened with a simple buckle, while the heel strap and the other three straps that criss-cross the foot are fixed. Our lead tester has narrow feet and found these fixed straps to be too loose. Those with wide feet may well find them too tight.


To keep this sandal on our feet while hiking, we tried cranking down on the one adjustable strap to make it as tight as possible. Unfortunately, the buckle isn't up to the task, and it loosened significantly after just a few minutes of hiking.

On the upside, with just one strap to think about, adjusting this sandal is a cinch! There is no learning curve here: The Terran Ari Lattice can be adjusted in about a second and can easily be loosened or tightened one-handed. For less technical applications, like walking around the city, we didn't mind the lack of adjustability at all. In fact, we found the simple design refreshing.

Note how poorly the Terran Ari Lattice's front straps conform to our tester's feet. These straps aren't adjustable  so unless your foot happens to fit the fixed straps perfectly  you'll have trouble keeping up with your pup on the trails.
Note how poorly the Terran Ari Lattice's front straps conform to our tester's feet. These straps aren't adjustable, so unless your foot happens to fit the fixed straps perfectly, you'll have trouble keeping up with your pup on the trails.

In contrast to the Terran Ari Lattice, the Chaco Z/Cloud 2, has fully adjustable straps thanks to its flow-through strap system, but this system is more complicated, so adjusting the sandal takes time. If you're looking for a product that's highly adjustable but is almost as simple as the Terran Ari Lattice, check out our Editors' Choice, the Bedrock Cairn Adventure.

Adaptability


This sandal is great for around-town use and light activity, but it's not suited for burly pursuits. It scored in the middle of the pack in this category.


Around town, the Terran Ari Lattice could handle whatever we threw at it. It was best for walking on paved sidewalks, but it also kept us comfortable on casual bike rides and trips to the dog park. It works well as a casual urban shoe and doesn't feel too out of place when meeting friends at the bar. This is also one of the lightest models we tested, so it's easy to slip into a carry-on when traveling.

The Merrell Terran Ari Lattice kept our tester comfortable during a mellow 10-mile city ride at Reno's 2018 Cyclofemme event.
The Merrell Terran Ari Lattice kept our tester comfortable during a mellow 10-mile city ride at Reno's 2018 Cyclofemme event.

This shoe does not transition well to more aggressive outdoor pursuits, which is why we recommend it primarily for the urban traveler. It will get you through a hike in a pinch, but we wouldn't want to backpack in it, and it's not well-suited for use in the water. We like that the Terran Ari Lattice is burlier than your average city sandal, so you could use it for an impromptu nature walk on your urban vacation. But if you want a sandal that will serve as a legitimate hiker or water shoe and will also take you around town, look elsewhere. We loved the Luna Mono Gordo 2.0 in this category, and the Chaco Z/Cloud 2 and Bedrock Cairn Adventure are both highly adaptable as well.

The Terran Ari Lattice kept us comfortable while walking to the bar  and was stylish enough to work with an urban outfit.
The Terran Ari Lattice kept us comfortable while walking to the bar, and was stylish enough to work with an urban outfit.

Style


Warning: Mixed opinions ahead! Style is individual, and this is evident with these sandals. We gave them high marks in this category, but your assessment may be different based on the photos in this review.


The Merrell Terran Ari Lattice looks less technical than most of the sandals in our test group. Its criss-cross straps, microfiber and leather materials, and single adjustment point give it a more elegant feel, such that it could even work in a business-casual office. This model scored well when we surveyed family and friends, with several stylish ladies picking it as their favorite in the test group.

The Merrell Terran Ari Lattice (left) and the Chaco Z/Cloud 2 (right). Which do you prefer?
The Merrell Terran Ari Lattice (left) and the Chaco Z/Cloud 2 (right). Which do you prefer?

Color is a significant factor here. We tested this sandal in Aquifer, and to be blunt, we didn't like it. The bright, ice-blue hue was tough to style — it felt very 2001 and could be paired easily with Lip Smackers. It also looked filthy after our first hike. The other color options were equally garish, and the inclusion of a white option makes us feel that Merrell is not going after the hard-core backpacking set with this sandal. The brown ("Bracken") and black options are the most versatile and would be much better at hiding dirt.

Best Applications


This sandal is best-suited for urban use. It performs well on city walks, casual bike rides, and flat walking paths, and would even be appropriate for summer wear in some business-casual offices. Short hikes work when wearing the Terran Ari Lattice, but it's not ideally suited to this purpose.

It's cute  but it's not super stable.
It's cute, but it's not super stable.

Value


At $80, the Terran Ari Lattice is one of the less expensive models we tested. This isn't a super durable model, but we think it will outperform most nontechnical city sandals on the market and will last for at least a few years, so $80 seems reasonable.

These are great sandals to throw on for a lazy morning at the dog park.
These are great sandals to throw on for a lazy morning at the dog park.

Conclusion


This sandal can't compete with most of our test group on backcountry trails, but for urban pursuits, this is one of the more comfortable and stylish models we tested. It's simultaneously lightweight enough to tuck into luggage and supportive enough to keep you comfortable for miles on pavement, so for your next city vacation, consider the Merrell Terran Ari Lattice.


Joanna Trieger