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Gregory Denali 100 Review

This pack is optimized for alpine expeditions such as Denali’s West Buttress, as the name suggests, with high marks for comfort.
Top Pick Award
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Price:  $400 List | $399.95 at REI
Compare prices at 3 resellers
Pros:  Durable, comfortable, good features for cold expeditions
Cons:  Cumbersome ice axe attachment, heavy for volume
Manufacturer:   Gregory Packs
By Lyra Pierotti ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Jul 26, 2019
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RANKED
#10 of 11
  • Weight to Volume Ratio - 30% 4
  • Comfort - 20% 6
  • Durability - 20% 8
  • Versatility - 20% 3
  • Features - 10% 6

Our Verdict

The Gregory Denali 100 is an excellent pack for Denali, as the name suggests. This model is optimized for big climbs in the Alaska Range — it has special loops for attaching a sled, and the tapered shape makes it climb much better on the technical terrain above 14,000 feet than most packs of this size. It is surprisingly comfortable as well, primarily due to the head-shaped semi-circular cutout in the top of the frame sheet, and the slight angle the frame takes away from your head. When you're trudging along for hours and hours, days and days, it becomes quite tedious to have a backpack restricting your head and neck movements — this pack allows much more freedom of movement than most contenders of this size and nature.


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Gregory Denali 100
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Price $399.95 at REI
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Pros Durable, comfortable, good features for cold expeditionsComfortable, affordable, durable, fully featuredSimple, light, comfortable, highly modularSimple, good weight to volume ratio, durableLightweight, simple, excellent pack for steep, technical terrain
Cons Cumbersome ice axe attachment, heavy for volumeNot as lightweight as some packsDifficult to overstuff for the approach, some finicky featuresCan't remove the foam suspension pad, not best for heavy loads, requires thoughtful packingLess durable, less versatile, no side straps
Bottom Line This pack is optimized for alpine expeditions such as Denali’s West Buttress, as the name suggests, with high marks for comfort.This is an excellent pack for most mountaineering uses, excelling in comfort and versatility, and climbs very well.The Ascensionist is a master of technical ascents with its light weight, versatility, and comfort on the climb.This is a light and durable pack which is a pleasure to use, and quickly became our go-to for a wide variety of climbing adventures.The Blitz is an excellent on-route climbing pack for challenging, steep terrain in the mountains.
Rating Categories Gregory Denali 100 Osprey Mutant 38 Patagonia Ascensionist 40 Arc'teryx Alpha FL 45 Black Diamond Blitz 28L
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Specs Gregory Denali 100 Osprey Mutant 38 Patagonia... Arc'teryx Alpha FL... Black Diamond...
Measured Volume (liters) 90 37 35 34 29
Measured Weight (pounds) 6.3 2.84 1.95 1.47 1.09
Measured Weight (grams) 2860.2 1288.2 884.5 667.38 496.1
Weight-To-Volume Ratio (grams per liter) 31.78 34.82 25.27 19.63 17.11
Frame Type Integrated framesheet, removable aluminum stays Inner framesheet with aluminum stays None Rigid, formed back panel Foam pad
Fabric 210D nylon 210D nylon with 420HD nylon packcloth on bottom 210D cordura N400r-AC2 nylon 6 ripstop Dynex ripstop
Pockets 3 zippered lid, 1 zippered side, 1-2 zippered front (modular), 1 zippered hip belt, 2 side pockets; 1 side access zipper 1 zippered lid 1 zippered lid, 1 small zippered internal 1 front zippered 1 main compartment, 1 waterproof top lid, 1 internal zippered
Hip belt Yes - removable, with gear loop and pocket Yes - reverse wrap hybrid EVA foam w/ gear loops and ice clipper holsters Yes Yes - webbing hip belt Yes - removable webbing belt
Removable Suspension Padding? Yes, removable framesheet and stays; also has a removable foam pad which unfolds to double in length Removable framesheet and/or dual stays Yes No Yes
Lid? Yes - removable Yes - removable with stowable FlapJacket for lidless use Yes, attached No Yes - removable
Hydration System Compatible? Yes, internal pouch with buckled hanging loop Yes, internal pouch with buckled hanging loop No No Yes

Our Analysis and Test Results

The Gregory Denali 100 is a great expedition backpack, specially tailored to the needs of climbers on Denali's popular West Buttress route.

Nearing 17 000ft camp on Denali’s West Buttress route.
Nearing 17,000ft camp on Denali’s West Buttress route.

Performance Comparison



Weight-To-Volume Ratio


The Denali is a hefty 6.3 pounds, though it's still not as heavy as our early 2000s Arc'teryx Bora 80 liter pack! Mountaineering and backpacking backpacks have come a long way in a relatively short amount of time, with lighter materials and simpler suspension.


However, given the importance of durability in expedition packs—because you rely upon it for potentially weeks at a time—we didn't penalize this pack as heavily for being so much heavier. Plus, as you add volume, and carry more stuff, you need more robust materials and beefier suspension.

The Denali swallows a whole lot of gear  as an expedition pack should.
The Denali swallows a whole lot of gear, as an expedition pack should.

Comfort


The Gregory Denali carried comfortably in a broad range of situations, which is relevant to a climb of, say, Denali (formerly Mt. McKinley in Alaska, and a Seven Summit), where you will be hauling loads to a high camp, then carrying a relatively light and empty pack back down to your current camp. The frame above the shoulder straps curves gently away from your head, and there is a semi-circular cutout where your head typically rests. We enjoyed the drastically improved range of motion and comfort for our head and neck while carrying the Denali.


We hauled expedition sleds with this pack as well, and we were impressed by the balance and relative comfort. This is likely because Gregory designed specific pull loops which are perfectly oriented to haul a sled efficiently. We've been rigging sleds onto backpacks without them for years, but those haul loops do make it ride just a little bit better, and they don't add any notable weight, bulk, or hassle. They also make attaching a sled to the pack significantly easier, especially while wearing gloves.

Hauling a sled during a round of testing with the Denali 100.
Hauling a sled during a round of testing with the Denali 100.

The Denali has thick padding, still a mainstay feature of heavy packs (in lighter models, we much prefer thin, stiff padding), but it is relatively rigid and durable. We liked the stiffness more than the softer padding you find in some 70-liter (large) backpacking backpacks. The padding is more important than one might initially think; when you put on a big, well-padded model in the store, this soft padding feels comfy, like a cloud on your back.

In the long term, softer padding will wear out quicker, and during a several day (or weeks long) trip (or expedition), this can result in a less precise and more wobbly fit. The softer padding is mildly less secure and stable than firmer padding. This is one reason we love stiffer padding on lightweight, technical climbing packs; it allows for a more precise fit for the times when you're busting some fancy climbing moves.

And when you're jugging lines on steep, blue ice, or fighting gusts of wind on Denali's West Buttress, you'll be psyched that the stiffer foam padding on the pack is there to help ensure your every move to counter the wind. It will also keep your balance transferred directly to that monster pack on your back.

Durability


There is no doubt that durability is an important feature on any expedition pack.


The Denali is a very durable pack, and we noted no significant durability issue on expeditions with it. This pack is up to par for all we could throw at it in the Alaska Range, and on some shorter test trips in the Pacific Northwest.

We had no fear attaching sharp items to the Denali. It's a rugged pack.
We had no fear attaching sharp items to the Denali. It's a rugged pack.

The Denali features 210 denier nylon which is lighter weight than the 420 or higher denier used in some other packs. The higher denier rating should be slightly more durable than a lower number, but it does not tell the whole story, as design and seams and manufacturing can all make a big difference.

In our field tests, we could not detect any notable issue in the quality of the use of fabrics or the overall design. In general, we have found that it is getting more and more challenging to judge packs based on the denier numbers alone due to other manufacturing processes. The summary of features and design, including where the stress points are, tends to give the best sense of durability.

Versatility


Almost as a rule, an expedition pack is a terrible all-rounder. Browse the rest of this review for a smaller pack, something in the 30-50 liter range, if you're looking for a more versatile model (though that size range won't be useful on most expeditions).


To round out our testing, we took this pack out on smaller test trips, but it was not a backpack to take for a day of cragging at our favorite rock climbing areas. It was not a pack that would go off the ground with us for multi-pitch climbs, and it was also not a pack we would take backcountry skiing, ice climbing, or on mountaineering trips of less than one week. The Denali is an expedition pack. It is HUGE. As such, it carries best when it is full, or mostly full, and it is floppy, heavy, and awkward when it is empty.

We liked the large side sleeves on the Denali 100. This makes a few key layers and snacks easier to access while fighting blustery weather on the move to high camp.
We liked the large side sleeves on the Denali 100. This makes a few key layers and snacks easier to access while fighting blustery weather on the move to high camp.

Features


Expedition packs are much more feature-heavy than the average climbing pack. We usually want our climbing and mountaineering packs to be simple, but extra features are often desirable on a week-long expedition.


Often you will be hauling a lot of food and gear to a high camp, so you don't need to access the contents of the pack, but you do want it to feel secure and stay well-packed during transit. This makes intelligent features, such as pockets, sleeves, and straps, a key component to a good expedition pack.

The ice axe is secured at the top with a standard loop of velcro; however  that velcro loop is also combined with the side strap buckle  which we didn’t like. If we wanted to get to our ice axe  we risked destabilizing the pickets and poles in this photo.
The ice axe is secured at the top with a standard loop of velcro; however, that velcro loop is also combined with the side strap buckle, which we didn’t like. If we wanted to get to our ice axe, we risked destabilizing the pickets and poles in this photo.

In general, the features on the Denali felt a bit fiddle-y and less intuitive. It took a little practice to get used to how best to use this pack.One feature that felt awkward was the ice axe attachment system on the Denali. The angle didn't work for our slightly curved, alpine ice tools (which one might carry on an expedition), and the Velcro loop that secures the shaft of the ice axe serves two purposes. They secure the ice axe but also clip across the side of the pack and bind any items you've lashed to the outside.

We didn't like this feature because it meant you had to keep track of two items if you needed to grab the ice axe. For example, if you remove the ice axe in high winds, and you have something strapped to the side, you have two things to keep track of when you unclip the side strap to undo the Velcro and release the ice axe. This is picky, but when conditions get brutal in cold environments, these kinds of details add up. We prefer a more straightforward approach to features like this.

The removable foam pad in the frame of the Denali means one less thing to carry on summit day  since we tend to carry a foam pad for safety on big alpine summit pushes.
The removable foam pad in the frame of the Denali means one less thing to carry on summit day, since we tend to carry a foam pad for safety on big alpine summit pushes.

The other part of the ice axe attachment is a small metal bar threaded through the hole in the head of the ice axe. This is similar to other packs, however, Gregory did not attach this metal bar to the pack with elastic cord, so it is quite challenging to wrangle the metal bar through the hole in the ice axe, especially with gloves on. This feature needs to be able to stretch to weave the bar through the head of the axe.

On the flat trek to basecamp  it was nice to have our water bottle easily accessible.
On the flat trek to basecamp, it was nice to have our water bottle easily accessible.

The Denali does have a sleeve to slide the picks of the ice axes into; a feature the Xenith did not have, which we preferred.

Best Applications


This is an expedition specific pack — even more, it is optimized for the climbing styles used on a route like the West Buttress of Denali, the packs' namesake peak. It drags sleds at just the right angle and has a tapered bottom which is much more comfortable and maneuverable when you're feeling the lack of oxygen on the fixed lines and the West Buttress itself. This pack also allows you to enjoy the view and move your head and neck with ease with the angled back frame above the shoulder straps and the head cutout.

Value


This pack comes in just under $400 and is on par with a pack of its size and quality.

Conclusion


The Gregory Denali is a great pack for a snowy expedition. It is optimized for hauling big loads on steep snow and ice, and for dragging sleds for days on end. The features are a little wonky at times, and Gregory could shave some weight by streamlining these features, but overall it is a solid pack that will keep you climbing happily in high places.

Probing out a safe camp in the middle of the Kahiltna Glacier  Alaska Range.
Probing out a safe camp in the middle of the Kahiltna Glacier, Alaska Range.


Lyra Pierotti