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Beal Dynamic Sling Review

A dynamic piece of climbing rope that is sewn into a sling and is ideal for reducing risk while clipping in direct to belay or rappel anchors.
Top Pick Award
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Price:  $13 List | $12.95 at REI
Compare prices at 2 resellers
Pros:  Has same dynamic elongation as a climbing rope, minimizes fall forces, core protected from UV and abrasion by the sheath
Cons:  Heavy, bulky, doesn’t carry well in an alpine quickdraw
Manufacturer:   Beal
By Andy Wellman ⋅ Senior Review Editor  ⋅  Aug 19, 2019
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51
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#12 of 12
  • Handle - 25% 6
  • Knot Test - 25% 8
  • Alpine Quickdraw Test - 20% 4
  • Weight - 15% 1
  • Bulk - 15% 4

Our Verdict

The Beal Dynamic Sling is a 8.3mm in diameter piece of climbing rope sewn into a sling. While it is heavy and bulky compared to the super thin and light Dyneema slings featured in this review, we chose to recognize it with a Top Pick award for clipping into a Belay or Anchor. The Dynamic Sling has a far better ability to dynamically stretch when suddenly weighted. This is invaluable for safety reasons if clipping yourself directly in with a sling. Beal has tested it to >20 factor 1 falls before failure, and >8 factor 2 falls as well, compared to one and zero of the same type of falls held by a Dyneema sling before breaking! Not convinced? Watch this informative testing video made by DMM. When at a belay or rappel station where you choose to clip in directly with a sling, having a dynamic option, such as the Beal Dynamic Sling, is far and away the safest choice.


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Beal Dynamic Sling
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Price $12.95 at REI
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Pros Has same dynamic elongation as a climbing rope, minimizes fall forces, core protected from UV and abrasion by the sheathLow weight, very thin, handles great, affordableVery light, low bulk, easy to manipulate, very small bar tackLight weight, low bulk, knots untie relatively easily, affordableLow price, light weight despite width, small bar tack
Cons Heavy, bulky, doesn’t carry well in an alpine quickdrawWeighted knots harder to untie than thicker slingsHigh price, harder than some to untie knotsNot as soft a handle as other top scorersAbrasive edges, wide for the weight
Bottom Line A dynamic piece of climbing rope that is sewn into a sling and is ideal for reducing risk while clipping in direct to belay or rappel anchors.The best climbing sling due to its great handle and low weight and width.A top-notch sling at a top-shelf priceA fantastic lightweight flat sling that is also affordableA solid sling at a fantastic price
Rating Categories Beal Dynamic Sling Mammut Contact Dyneema Petzl Pur'Anneau Sling Black Diamond Dynex Runner Trango Low Bulk 11mm Sling
Handle (25%)
10
0
6
10
0
9
10
0
8
10
0
7
10
0
7
Knot Test (25%)
10
0
8
10
0
5
10
0
6
10
0
7
10
0
7
Alpine Quickdraw Test (20%)
10
0
4
10
0
10
10
0
9
10
0
8
10
0
8
Weight (15%)
10
0
1
10
0
10
10
0
10
10
0
9
10
0
9
Bulk (15%)
10
0
4
10
0
10
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
7
Specs Beal Dynamic Sling Mammut Contact... Petzl Pur'Anneau... Black Diamond... Trango Low Bulk...
Type of Fiber Dynamic Rope Dyneema High-Modulus Polyethalene Dynex Dyneema
Measured weight 78g 19g 19g 20g 20g
Width Tested 8.3mm 8mm 10mm 10mm 11mm
Length Tested 60cm 60cm 60cm 60cm 60cm
Strength 22kN 22Kn 22Kn 22Kn 22Kn
Widths Available 8.3mm 8mm 10mm 10mm 11mm
Lengths Available 60cm; 120cm; 150cm 60cm; 120cm 60cm; 120cm; 180cm 30cm; 60cm; 120cm; 240cm 30cm; 60cm; 120cm

Our Analysis and Test Results

The Beal Dynamic Sling, as it is most often named in the US, or also known as the Dynaloop, as listed on Beal's website, is made out of a sewn 8.3mm loop of climbing rope. It comes in lengths of 60cm (double length), 120cm (quadruple length), and 150cm. We tested the double-length 60cm version and found that it was perfect for girth hitching through our belay loop and clipping into an anchor point with a locking carabiner. As the video linked in Our Verdict shows, it is only appropriate to use Dyneema slings in a static manner, or with part of the climbing rope involved in the anchor, or you risk breaking the sling in even a very short fall. If you were to clip in direct to an anchor using a sling, as most climbers do while rappelling, or at a multi-pitch anchor, and then somehow take a fall onto this sling (stranger things have happened), you quite literally risk breaking that sling unless it has the ability to dynamically stretch, a very sobering thought. Tying directly into the master point of an anchor with the rope is an easy way to alleviate this concern, but if for any number of reasons this isn't possible, clipping in with a dynamic sling, or PAS(Personal Anchor System), such as the Beal Dynamic Sling, is highly recommended.

The 60cm sling that we tested landed at the bottom of our comparative scoring because it is the heaviest and bulkiest sling in the review, and also doesn't allow for tripling up into alpine quickdraws. This shouldn't dissuade one from buying one, however, as its intended purpose is invaluable. The double-length version is versatile enough to be used as a runner while on lead as well, you have to carry it over the shoulder when not in use. The longer versions are designed for building equalized anchors with dynamic properties, but we surmise that the bulk of the 8.3mm cord compared to other options will be a bit prohibitive. Using a thinner and less bulky cordalette, or a sling made of dyneema, for building an anchor is probably a more efficient option.

Performance Comparison


The bright yellow Beal Dynamic sling is attached to the belay loop here with a girth hitch  and is used to clip the climber into rappel anchors as he descends. The 60cm version of this sling  while slightly bulky  is the perfect length for this use.
The bright yellow Beal Dynamic sling is attached to the belay loop here with a girth hitch, and is used to clip the climber into rappel anchors as he descends. The 60cm version of this sling, while slightly bulky, is the perfect length for this use.

Handle


The Dynamic Sling feels a lot like a piece of climbing rope, and is not nearly as smooth or soft, or supple, as most of the other slings in this review. While it is far more flexible and supple than the Edelrid Aramid Cord Sling, that isn't saying much, because the Aramid Cord is designed on purpose to be very stiff. Compared to a climbing rope, this sling is not soft and squishy, but rather firm and tight.


The sheath is tightly woven like all ropes, and has the notable advantage of providing an extra layer of protection to the core, which is where the true weight bearing fibers are found. For this reason, this sling is likely far more durable than much thinner slings, and makes a good choice for using as protection around horns or flakes. Overall, it is a bit more unwieldy than we expect of a normal climbing sling, and so we rated it low compared to the competition when assessing for its handle.

The bright yellow Beal Dynamic Loop sling is designed for  and is also ideal for  tethering oneself into a belay or rappel anchor  as we are doing here. The 60cm version is the perfect length to use as a lanyard like this  and is far more secure and safer than doing the same thing with a Dyneema sling that lacks dynamic properties.
The bright yellow Beal Dynamic Loop sling is designed for, and is also ideal for, tethering oneself into a belay or rappel anchor, as we are doing here. The 60cm version is the perfect length to use as a lanyard like this, and is far more secure and safer than doing the same thing with a Dyneema sling that lacks dynamic properties.

On the top is a Sterling 9.5mm climbing rope  and on the bottom is the 8.3mm Beal Dynamic sling. As you can see  this sling is basically just a sewn loop of climbing rope  and thus feels and behaves much like one in the hand.
On the top is a Sterling 9.5mm climbing rope, and on the bottom is the 8.3mm Beal Dynamic sling. As you can see, this sling is basically just a sewn loop of climbing rope, and thus feels and behaves much like one in the hand.

Knot Test


When tying knots in this cord, expect it to feel pretty much exactly like a stiff rope. To tie and untie a clove hitch is not problem, but when tying a figure-eight on a bight, we found the cord to be a bit stiff, ensuring that it didn't want to automatically cinch down super tight. Tying this knot also uses up a large percentage of the cord, drastically shortening its length.


When attempting to untie the weighted knots, we found that in general they didn't tighten down as much as the small diameter sling material did, and so were easier to untie. However, for whatever reason, we found the smaller 6mm cord of the Edelrid Aramid Cord Sling to be even easier to untie.

When tying a figure eight on a bight  the dynamic sling behaved very similarly to a rope  as you would expect. It doesn't cinch down as tightly as a flat sling  so it is easier to untie after weighting.
When tying a figure eight on a bight, the dynamic sling behaved very similarly to a rope, as you would expect. It doesn't cinch down as tightly as a flat sling, so it is easier to untie after weighting.

The dynamic sling can easily be tied in a clove hitch to an anchor piece  and is also a cinch to untie.
The dynamic sling can easily be tied in a clove hitch to an anchor piece, and is also a cinch to untie.

Alpine Quickdraw Test


We shouldn't claim that this sling cannot be tripled up into an alpine quickdraw, because our testing shows that it can. However, it is problematic enough as to be completely ineffective, and so we don't recommend even trying. The cord is too thick to force through small carabiners, and when tripled up, it simply doesn't sit well and loops all over the place. We wouldn't want to clip the rope into a draw tripled up like this.


A better way to carry it is simply over the shoulder as you climb. If you have no intention of using it while on lead, and want to carry it on the harness, simply tying a figure eight knot in the middle and clipping both ends to a carabiner hanging from the harness will allow it to be short enough that it won't dangle in the way.

While it is technically possible to turn this sling into an alpine quickdraw  you can see here that it isn't a pretty sight. To to the general twistiness and mess of how this turned out  we wouldn't use it or clip the rope to it in this manner.
While it is technically possible to turn this sling into an alpine quickdraw, you can see here that it isn't a pretty sight. To to the general twistiness and mess of how this turned out, we wouldn't use it or clip the rope to it in this manner.

Weight


We weighed our 60cm sling at 78g, which is nearly twice as heavy as the next closest competitor.


At 8.3mm thick, this should come as no surprise. While you can use this as pro or for extending pro while on lead, the real use is clipping into anchors, so the heavy weight should not dissuade you from owning and carrying one.

Weighing in at 78 grams  this sling is almost double the weight of the next heaviest  and close to four times the weight of the lightest Dyneema slings. We think it is worth the benefits to carry one of these with you on mulit-pitch climbs  despite the weight.
Weighing in at 78 grams, this sling is almost double the weight of the next heaviest, and close to four times the weight of the lightest Dyneema slings. We think it is worth the benefits to carry one of these with you on mulit-pitch climbs, despite the weight.

Bulk


It should come as no surprise that this is also far and away the bulkiest sling of those that we tested.


Not only is it relatively fat, but its stiffness also doesn't allow it to be stuffed super small, and it doesn't sit tidy on the harness. Furthermore, the area of stitching where the two ends of the sling are sewn together is double fat, with a thermo-molded plastic sheath covering it. This sheath likes to get hung up while sliding through carabiners.

Showing the differences between different slings  especially their bulk. On the top is the Beal Dynamic sling  which is clearly the most bulky. Below it is a nylon sling for comparison  then the Dyneema/Nylon blend of the Metolius sling. In orange is the Trango Low Bulk sling (11mm)  below it the Petzl Puranneau  and below that in red is the Mammut Contact Sling. On the bottom is the Edelrid Aramid Cord  which is 6mm in diameter  and only more bulky than those above it because of its relative stiffness.
Showing the differences between different slings, especially their bulk. On the top is the Beal Dynamic sling, which is clearly the most bulky. Below it is a nylon sling for comparison, then the Dyneema/Nylon blend of the Metolius sling. In orange is the Trango Low Bulk sling (11mm), below it the Petzl Puranneau, and below that in red is the Mammut Contact Sling. On the bottom is the Edelrid Aramid Cord, which is 6mm in diameter, and only more bulky than those above it because of its relative stiffness.

Value


For climbing slings, this one is on the more expensive end of the spectrum. That said, it really isn't very pricey. Since we recommend only needing one, the added cost should not come as much of a burden, and for the added security it provides, we think it presents solid value.

The advantage of using a dynamic sling such as this one when clipping directly into an anchor is massive. As the only attachment point while rigging a rappel  if it were to become suddenly loaded with even a very short fall  the forces can be massive  and tests have shown that a dynamic cord is far safer for absorbing those forces without breaking than a static sling made out of Dyneema.
The advantage of using a dynamic sling such as this one when clipping directly into an anchor is massive. As the only attachment point while rigging a rappel, if it were to become suddenly loaded with even a very short fall, the forces can be massive, and tests have shown that a dynamic cord is far safer for absorbing those forces without breaking than a static sling made out of Dyneema.

Conclusion


The Beal Dynamic Sling is made out of a loop of sewn climbing rope, in stark contrast to the majority of slings which are sewn flat or tubular webbing. It is our Top Pick for Clipping into Anchors because it allows for dynamic elongation, whereas Dyneema slings do not, and Nylon slings elongate much less. This ability to stretch means they can absorb far more forces than their counterparts, which is critical when you are relying on only one piece of equipment, like when you are clipped into a belay or rappel station. While we see no need for multiples, having one dynamic sling such as this one to use as a PAS or for clipping in short can greatly enhance the security against unforeseen events.

Evan follows traverse at the top of the the brilliant second pitch of Gulag Archipelago at Smith Rock. Although it must be worn over the shoulder rather than on the harness in an alpine quickdraw  the dynamic sling works great for extending protection to reduce rope drag.
Evan follows traverse at the top of the the brilliant second pitch of Gulag Archipelago at Smith Rock. Although it must be worn over the shoulder rather than on the harness in an alpine quickdraw, the dynamic sling works great for extending protection to reduce rope drag.


Andy Wellman