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Gossamer Gear The One Review

An affordable fully enclosed single person shelter that we love.
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Price:  $300 List
Pros:  Roomy, easy to setup, fully enclosed, affordable
Cons:  Heavier, design not quite as wind stable as double vestibule options
Manufacturer:   Gossamer Gear
By Amber King & Andy Wellman  ⋅  Aug 31, 2018
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75
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#4 of 19
  • Livability - 30% 9
  • Weight - 25% 7
  • Weather Resistance - 25% 7
  • Adaptability - 10% 6
  • Ease of Set-Up - 10% 7

Our Verdict

After a bit of a hiatus, Gossamer Gear's The One is back in action, and in our opinion, one of the most affordable single ultralight shelter options out there. Designed for one person, it is made using the tried and true "tarp tent" design: a single wall a-frame tarp supported by dual trekking poles. The interior tent features a mesh bug netting and a bathtub floor sewn in place. Made with SilNylon, it doesn't offer the best of the best for weather protection, but it'll keep you dry. It's a simple, roomy for one model, and with exquisite attention paid to every little detail. If you love to backpack solo and want to go light, without spending an arm and a leg, this is "The One" for you!

Updates to The One

A few small changes have been added to this lightweight, single person tarp tent that has held our Top Pick award for a few years now.

Read on to find out what has changed.


Compare to Similar Products

 
Awards  Editors' Choice Award Top Pick Award Top Pick Award Top Pick Award 
Price $300 List$600 List$700 List$715.00 at Backcountry
Compare at 2 sellers
$535 List
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Pros Roomy, easy to setup, fully enclosed, affordableAmazingly light, four-sided weather protection, ample space for two, double doorsGreat weather protection, lightweight, adaptableDCF construction is lightweight and waterproof, super spacious, four season useUnder a pound, bombproof dyneema construction, ultralight stakes included
Cons Heavier, design not quite as wind stable as double vestibule optionsExpensive, doesn’t include necessary stakesExpensiveRequires lashing two poles together for setup, very expensive, no floor or bug protection built inExpensive, single pole set-up takes a little practice
Bottom Line An affordable fully enclosed single person shelter that we love.Ample space and exceptional performance in all metrics makes this our favorite ultralight shelter.This is the shelter you want when waiting out a storm.A super high-quality and spacious single wall pyramid with a high price tag to match its quality.Our favorite ultralight shelter for strictly solo adventures.
Rating Categories Gossamer Gear The One ZPacks Duplex Flex Upgrade Tarptent StratoSpire Li UltaMid 2 Tarptent Aeon Li
Livability (30%)
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
10
10
0
9
10
0
8
Weight (25%)
10
0
7
10
0
7
10
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6
10
0
4
10
0
9
Weather Resistance (25%)
10
0
7
10
0
9
10
0
10
10
0
9
10
0
7
Adaptability (10%)
10
0
6
10
0
7
10
0
4
10
0
8
10
0
4
Ease Of Set Up (10%)
10
0
7
10
0
7
10
0
6
10
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8
10
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6
Specs Gossamer Gear The... ZPacks Duplex Flex... Tarptent... UltaMid 2 Tarptent Aeon Li
Type Single wall tent w/ sewn in bug mesh and floor Single wall tent w/ sewn in bug mesh and floor Single wall tent w/ removable floor and bug netting Floorless Pyramid Single wall tent w/ sewn in bug mesh and floor
Weight with all components 1.68 lbs 1.8 lbs 1.60 lbs 2.32 lbs 1.09 lbs
Measured Weight of All Included Shelter Parts Total: 1 lb. 6 oz., Tent: 1 lb. 5.1 oz., Extra tie outs: 0.5 oz., Stuff sack: 0.4 oz., Optional aluminum poles: 5.7 oz. Total: 1 lb. 5 oz Tent: 19.7 oz, Guy lines and clips: 1.2 oz, Stuff sack: .3 oz. (Flex upgrade: 11oz) Total: 1 lb.10 oz, Floor and bug net: 11.5 oz, Fly: 14.1 oz Mid: 1 lb. 7.7 oz. (bug insert with floor = 22 oz, bug insert w/o floor = 13.4 oz.) Total: 1 lb. 1 oz., Tent with Bathtub floor and bug net: 15.8 oz., Stakes: 1.7 oz.
Stakes Included? No No Yes No Yes
Poles Needed for Set-up? Yes Yes w/o flex kit
No w/ flex kit
Yes Yes, unless suspended from the peak Yes
Capacity 1 person 2 person 2 person 2 person 1 person
Max Floor Dimensions (inches) 88" x 34" 45" x 90" 86" x 45" 83" x 107" 88" x 30"
Peak Height (inches) 46" 48" 45" 64" 47"
Fabric 7D high tenacity nylon-blended sil/pu coating .51 oz/sqyd DCF Fabric Dyneema Composite Fabrics DCF8 Dyneema Composite Fabrics Dyneema Composite Fabrics
Packed Size (inches) 6" x 9" 7" x 13" 16" x 4" 8.5" x 6" x 5.5" 14" x 4"
Floor Area 19.55 sq ft 28.13 sq ft 26.88 sq ft 63 sq ft 18.3 sq ft
Doors 1 2 2 1 1
Interior Pockets 1 2 2 0 1
Number of Poles 2 trekking poles 4 2 trekking poles 2 trekking poles 1 trekking pole
Number of Tie Outs 10 8 8 8 7
1-person version? Yes No No No Yes

Our Analysis and Test Results

Updates to The One


Gossamer Gear has made a few minor changes to this lightweight, popular tent. The most noticeable update is the change in color. Second, Gossamer Gear now includes 14 stakes to the tent. Previously, these necessary accessories had to be purchased separately.

Below is a comparison of the new version on the left and the previous version on the right.

Listed below is a summary of the updates made to The One tent:
  • Color — The color has changed for the Fall 2018 season.
  • Stakes included — The One tent now comes with 14 stakes, which previously came separately.

Hands-on Review of The One


The One is a single person, fully enclosed shelter that is made of silnylon and relies on two adjustable trekking poles (or two custom length poles that can be purchased separately) for setting up. It is designed only for one person and has a single entrance point and vestibule. The other side of the tarp is a solid vertical wall and protected from above by a much lower profile beak style awning than the one that makes up the vestibule. This design saves a little weight but costs when it comes to wind resistance, necessitating orienting the tent optimally during setup. This tent has a bit of a cult following, and after a couple of years of being unavailable, it is now often sold out, so get yours while you can! If you like this style of tarp tent design but usually travel as a duo, check out The Two, which is also made of SilNylon but has double doors and vestibules.

What is Included, and What Isn't?
Included in a standard purchase are the single wall tent, four extra guy wires that are pre-cut with line locks in place for adding on to the sides in especially stormy weather, and a light silnylon stuff sack that easily fits the rolled-up tent. It also includes stakes and extra guy lines. The tent can be set up with two adjustable trekking poles, or Gossamer Gear sells the proper length poles in aluminum or carbon. The tent comes factory seam taped, so it does not need to be seam sealed.

This solo tent is an awesome and affordable shelter. Here we set it up on the rim of road canyon on a very pleasant evening in the Cedar Mesa Wilderness  what used to be Bears Ears National Monument.
This solo tent is an awesome and affordable shelter. Here we set it up on the rim of road canyon on a very pleasant evening in the Cedar Mesa Wilderness, what used to be Bears Ears National Monument.

Livability


This single-person tent is very comfortable with plenty of room and features to optimize comfort for a single person. The peak of its tarp is perfectly centered, affording equal, steep slope angles for the roof that ensure that there is room for both your head and feet to rest comfortably without touching the tent fabric.

The One has the possibility of pulling both vestibule doors back  as we are here  and remains tensioned by the yellow wire. We found it to be rather palatial for one person  and think that two could spoon if absolutely necessary.
The One has the possibility of pulling both vestibule doors back, as we are here, and remains tensioned by the yellow wire. We found it to be rather palatial for one person, and think that two could spoon if absolutely necessary.

It is fully enclosed on the inside with a mix of SilNylon walls and bug netting so that one has both privacy and total protection from buzzing mosquitos or crawling ticks. The bathtub floor is also made of SilNylon and is over seven feet long end to end, more than enough space for comfortably lying down, and is more than wide enough for a full inflatable air mattress. The high roof height makes it easy to sit up inside the tent as well.

Clearly there is plenty of head height to spare! This tent is super livable and quite comfortable for hanging out in during a storm.
Clearly there is plenty of head height to spare! This tent is super livable and quite comfortable for hanging out in during a storm.

We also love the large vestibule that has enough room to store a pack, shoes, and even to cook inside if need be due to the weather. The vestibule is composed of double flaps that zip together and can easily stand with one or both pulled back and attached to the tarp if the weather is good. There is a single storage pocket on the inside, as well as a clothesline already in place.

Weight


At 1 pound 6 ounces of included material, it was nowhere near as light as the other solo shelters made of tougher and lighter materials. That said, it comes with a bathtub floor sewn in place, which we love. Overall it is one of the lighter tents that we have tested, but carrying it alone will certainly put one over the weight threshold of "ultralight". While gram counters may consider this tent a tad heavy, we would argue that weight-efficient built-in bug protection and flooring are certainly worth its cost, especially if needed.

The complete package: Tent  four extra guy wires with line locks (optional for heavy winds  not usually necessary)  and stuff sack. The poles shown here were ordered custom from Gossamer Gear and cost only $29  but can be replaced by trekking poles.
The complete package: Tent, four extra guy wires with line locks (optional for heavy winds, not usually necessary), and stuff sack. The poles shown here were ordered custom from Gossamer Gear and cost only $29, but can be replaced by trekking poles.

Weather Resistance


In general, we find the A-frame tarp tent design to be stable and resistant to wind and rain. Unfortunately, it doesn't do as well in the wind. It has a vestibule on one side and a vertical wall with a much smaller beak awning on the other. This vertical wall hinders performance in a strong wind, and one must be mindful of setting this tent up with wind direction in mind, so this wall is on the lee side, a bit of a knock when considering all-purpose weather resistance.

Awesome clearance from the tarp to the inner bathtub floor allows water to drain and drip off the canopy without issues with splashback. Line Locks help tension the tent as it sags a bit when wet.
Awesome clearance from the tarp to the inner bathtub floor allows water to drain and drip off the canopy without issues with splashback. Line Locks help tension the tent as it sags a bit when wet.

Another slight knock is that the tent is made entirely of SilNylon versus the lighter and more waterproof DCF fiber of some others. While its material is rated to 1200mm of static head, more than enough to keep you dry, SilNylon tends to stretch and sag a bit when wet, either from rain or from dew or condensation, necessitating a trip outside the tent to tighten up guy lines and stake out points with the included line locks in order to maintain its tautness. The trade-off is in price, and this tent costs half as much as a comparable DCF tent. Overall, it does the work that any good tent should in poor weather.

Made completely of SilNylon  this tent is effective at forcing water to bead up and run off  although nylon does absorb water over time and thus stretches and sags slightly  a minor drawback.
Made completely of SilNylon, this tent is effective at forcing water to bead up and run off, although nylon does absorb water over time and thus stretches and sags slightly, a minor drawback.

Adaptability


Because the interior walls, floor, and bug netting are permanently in place, there is no option with this tent to go modular and remove the aspects that are not needed when in arid, less buggy climates. It is also not free-standing, so it needs six stake out points in the ground soft enough to take them, or quite a few large and heavy rocks if the ground is too firm. Both of these affect its adaptability a bit.

Showing the non-vestibule side of the tent  its a vertical inner wall with a small beak awning for protection. This design necessitates setting it up in a place where this side will not be exposed to full winds. While it isn't free-standing  we managed to tension it with only rocks on this nice slickrock campsite.
Showing the non-vestibule side of the tent, its a vertical inner wall with a small beak awning for protection. This design necessitates setting it up in a place where this side will not be exposed to full winds. While it isn't free-standing, we managed to tension it with only rocks on this nice slickrock campsite.

Also worth noting is that the single vestibule design means that this tent should be adequately oriented to the wind, further limiting its adaptability. However, while it best suits only one person, there is no doubt it is roomy enough for two to spoon together in an emergency (although we wouldn't intentionally plan for this).

Ease of Set Up


Over the years, we have found that setting up tarp tents is not nearly as intuitive as a dedicated pole tent and requires a fair bit of practice.

Setup with one person is pretty easy  especially since staking out the corners as the first step holds the tent in place if there is wind. With a little practice  we could easily set this tent up alone in less than 1.5 minutes.
Setup with one person is pretty easy, especially since staking out the corners as the first step holds the tent in place if there is wind. With a little practice, we could easily set this tent up alone in less than 1.5 minutes.

However, once the learning phase is over, they can be set up very quickly and easily by just one person. This tent is no exception and is about as quick as they come. To set up, stake out all four corners with a little bit of slack. In a windstorm, this makes one person set up a breeze, because there is no longer any need to hold the tent in place. Insert the poles in the middle of each side, made easy on this version because they attach to grommets and have keepers on the outside of the tent. Next, stake out the vestibule and opposite side tensioner and finally make a quick pass around the whole tent optimizing tautness of the stakeout points. With practice, the setup of this tent can be rapid and easy.

Ease of setup with one person is greatly aided by the fact that the poles attach on the outside  and are held in place with keeper cords  shown here. Also shown is the easy to tension yellow cord that keeps the roof apex taut.
Ease of setup with one person is greatly aided by the fact that the poles attach on the outside, and are held in place with keeper cords, shown here. Also shown is the easy to tension yellow cord that keeps the roof apex taut.

Value


This shelter has an affordable price tag in relation to other ultralight shelters that include bug protection. The solo hiker that is traveling to buggy places appreciated privacy and carries adjustable poles will find the most value in this tent. We think it's a great deal and one not to be missed.

Conclusion


Gossamer Gear's The One is one of the best single-person lightweight shelters that we have tested. It is a spacious, well-designed shelter that is very popular in the thru-hiking world and has withstood the tests of time. Its greatest attributes are its affordability, built-in bug protection, and its attention to detail in construction. If you want to lighten your backpacking load and often travel solo, this is the tent we recommend for you.

For one person  no tent is as comfortable  highly refined  or easy to setup as The One!
For one person, no tent is as comfortable, highly refined, or easy to setup as The One!


Amber King & Andy Wellman