The world's most in-depth and scientific reviews of outdoor gear

Exped HyperQuilt 36 Review

A quilt with a good hood, but lacking in width and warmth.
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Price:  $220 List | $164.21 at MooseJaw
Compare prices at 2 resellers
Pros:  Inexpensive, good hood for a quilt.
Cons:  Not warm, too narrow, shallow footbox.
Manufacturer:   Exped
By Ethan Newman ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  May 13, 2019
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50
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#14 of 14
  • Warmth - 30% 4
  • Weight - 25% 6
  • Comfort - 20% 5
  • Versatility - 15% 4
  • Features - 10% 7

Our Verdict

The Exped Hyperquilt is a hooded, summer-weight quilt designed for summer trips or hut use, or even as a liner for a thicker bag in cold temps. It comes with a few excellent features, such as a comfortable and functional hood, and a superb drybag stuff sack. However, we weren't all that thrilled about the dimensions and fit of the bag, nor the warmth. With the main requirements of a sleeping bag being warmth and comfort, we had a hard time scoring this quilt very high.


Compare to Similar Products

Our Analysis and Test Results

While there are only so many variations to a sleeping bag or quilt, with the features of the Exped Hyperquilt we had high hopes. Initially we thought the Hyperquilt would be a lighter, sleeker version of the luxurious-but-heavy Sierra Designs Backcountry Quilt, both with innovative hooded quilt designs. We did like some of the features — the stuff sack and hood were both excellent — but they didn't pull enough weight to counterbalance the lack of fit and warmth.

Performance Comparison


Fluffing the Exped Hyperquilt while cowboy camping in the Canaan Mountain Wilderness.
Fluffing the Exped Hyperquilt while cowboy camping in the Canaan Mountain Wilderness.

Warmth


The Exped Hyperquilt's "comfort temperature" is a summery 41°F, with a "limit temperature" of 32°F, which seems a tad generous. We first put it to the frozen water bottle test, where it performed a little bit below bags and quilts with a similar temperature rating. The Hyperquilt has a fill weight of 9 oz, similar to the Feathered Friends Flicker 40 and Vireo UL, as well as the Thermarest Vesper 32. It was a bit colder than all three.

In the field, it performed similarly. Our testers thought that the hood added a bit of warmth, but the dimensions of the quilt prevented testers from staying too toasty. The dimensions of the Hyperquilt is 12 to 20 inches narrower than every other quilt and bag in the review. The narrowness prevents both sides of the quilt touching the sleeping pad unless the sleeper is flat on their back. Additionally, there isn't any integral way to attach the quilt to a sleeping pad without buying the accompanying mat sheet, which would both increase the price and negatively affect the trail weight.

The Exped Hyperquit hood shape is nice  but the drawstrings end up in your mouth
The Exped Hyperquit hood shape is nice, but the drawstrings end up in your mouth

Weight


The Hyperquilt weighs 19 ounces on our independent scale, a bit higher at the listed 18.2 ounces on the Exped website. Although 19 ounces ain't bad, there are higher performing quilts for the same weight, like the Feathered Friends Flicker 40, or lighter options as well. To get the full warmth performance as listed by the manufacturer, you'd have to purchase the Mat Sheet Hyper, which would add 3.4 ounces to your sleep system.

At 19 oz  we think there are better options than the Hyperquilt.
At 19 oz, we think there are better options than the Hyperquilt.

Comfort


Again, the limiting factor of this category is the Hyperquilt's dimensions. The narrowness of the quilt maintained a steady creep of cold air into the warm space under the bag, and our tester's feet kept slipping out of the overly shallow footbox. This bag would be most comfortable for back sleepers, as that's the only way the hood faces the right way and the quilt stays sealed.

The Exped Hyperquilt has the shallowest footbox of any of the quilts  and our tester's feet kept slipping out throughout the night
The Exped Hyperquilt has the shallowest footbox of any of the quilts, and our tester's feet kept slipping out throughout the night

Versatility


This bag is sold as a summerweight bag or for hut use, or even a three-season bag with the matching mat sheet. To make it a three-season bag, however, Exped recommends using the Hyperquilt with a heavier mat and a mat sheet, negating both the versatility of the single quilt and adding on weight. We can only really see using this bag in warmer temperatures.

The 20D fabric with DWR did all right repelling water  but not as good as some of the other bags.
The 20D fabric with DWR did all right repelling water, but not as good as some of the other bags.

Features


As a hooded quilt, we were hoping the Exped quilt would be like a lighter weight Sierra Designs Backcountry Quilt 700. We like the hood and that it can also be totally sealed off to make it more of a blanket style quilt. However, the drawstrings from the draft collar around the hood tended to hang in our faces. We also felt that the footbox was too shallow to keep the more wiggly sleepers' feet in. However, the dry bag stuff sack is one of our favorites, providing both compressibility and water protection.

Best Applications


While the manufacturer touts the Hyperquilt for many uses, we think the two best applications for this quilt would be warm summer trips or hut/hostel use. We could see using it on a summer bike-packing trip, or going from yurt to yurt in the mountains. It's going to be more enjoyable for back-sleepers.

The drybag stuff sack for the Exped Hyperquilt is a nice touch  which allows some compression as well as the obvious protection against getting soaked.
The drybag stuff sack for the Exped Hyperquilt is a nice touch, which allows some compression as well as the obvious protection against getting soaked.

Value


At $220, the Exped Hyperquilt is the second least expensive option in the review. This does make the quilt more enticing for budget buyers, but we think there are better budget options like the Best Buy award winning Hammock Gear Burrow Econ 20.

Conclusion


Although the Exped Hyperquilt 36 didn't score high in this review, we believe that with expanded dimensions and its own pad attachment system that this could be a much better quilt. We liked some of the features, but not enough to offset the other issues. It's light, but there are lighter and warmer options out there. We hope to see an improved version in the future. On its side, though, is its lower-than-most price in a category that gets real expensive real quick.


Ethan Newman