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Warbonnet Ridgerunner Review

The Ridgerunner is a luxurious and innovative hammock with spreader bars for a super flat lay, an integrated bug net, and lots of storage.
Top Pick Award
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Price:  $210 List
Pros:  The comfiest/flattest sleeping surface, optional integrated bug net and double layer bottom, large gear pockets
Cons:  Suspension sold separately, not for the lightweight crowd, vulnerable to tipping
Manufacturer:   Warbonnet
By Elizabeth Paashaus and Penney Garrett  ⋅  May 7, 2019
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76
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#4 of 20
  • Comfort - 40% 9
  • Weight - 20% 5
  • Durability and Protection - 20% 9
  • Ease of Set Up - 10% 6
  • Versatility - 10% 6

Our Verdict

We truly enjoy the unique Warbonnet Ridgerunner and the versatile sleeping options it provides. This rig is a game-changer when it comes to hammock camping. Made from top-of-the-line materials, this is the only full shelter model we tested that comes with two lightweight spreader bars, allowing a user to lay comfortably on their back, side or even stomach! For this reason, we awarded the Ridgerunner a Top Pick Award for Ultimate Comfort.


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Awards Top Pick Award Editors' Choice Award Top Pick Award Top Pick Award Top Pick Award 
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Pros The comfiest/flattest sleeping surface, optional integrated bug net and double layer bottom, large gear pocketsSpacious, comfortable, easy to set up and use, integrated bug net, customizableVersatile, ultra customizable, comfortableVersatile, extremely customizable, comfortableLightweight, spacious, easy set up, versatile for day use or backcountry shelter
Cons Suspension sold separately, not for the lightweight crowd, vulnerable to tippingSuspension sold separately, can't remove bug net completelyCan get pricey depending on options, ridge-line not removableFixed ridgeline, can get expensive depending on options, long wait for customizationAll components sold separately, can only use branded suspension system, pricey for the full system
Bottom Line The Ridgerunner is a luxurious and innovative hammock with spreader bars for a super flat lay, an integrated bug net, and lots of storage.All the features and comfort in a lightweight package.This extremely customizable hammock is the perfect fit for even the pickiest hammock camper.If you’re looking to support a small cottage industry business and aren’t willing to sacrifice on comfort and versatility, the Dream Hammock Sparrow is an excellent option.Not willing to sacrifice on versatility in a comfortable, lightweight hammock shelter? The Pro Double is an excellent balance of all three!
Rating Categories Warbonnet Ridgerunner Warbonnet Original Blackbird Dutchware Chameleon Dream Sparrow Sea to Summit Pro Double
Comfort (40%)
10
0
9
10
0
8
10
0
7
10
0
7
10
0
6
Weight (20%)
10
0
5
10
0
8
10
0
8
10
0
8
10
0
8
Durability And Protection (20%)
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
8
Ease Of Set Up (10%)
10
0
6
10
0
7
10
0
7
10
0
7
10
0
7
Versatility (10%)
10
0
6
10
0
7
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
9
Totals (%)
10
0
10
10
0
10
10
0
10
10
0
10
10
0
10
Specs Warbonnet... Warbonnet Original... Dutchware Chameleon Dream Sparrow Sea to Summit Pro...
Capacity (weight) 200-250 lbs depending on options selected 350-400 lbs depending on options selected 350 lbs 275 lbs 400 lbs
Hanging Straps Included ? No, can add onto purchase for extra $ no, can add onto purchase for extra $ No No No
Hammock Size 10'1" x 3' 10' x 5.25' 10' 8" x 4'10" 10' 7" x 4' 10" 10' x 6'2"
Size Compact 15" x 7" 10" x 4" 12" x 6" 15" x 6" 4" x 6"
Connectors Whoopies/straps or buckle/webbing (sold separately) Whoopies/straps or buckle/webbing (sold separately) Beetle Buckle with webbing straps or whoopie slings with tree huggers (sold separately) webbing tree straps Buckles
Material 1.1oz/30D Nylon Double Layer 40D or 70D Nylon (depending on options selected) Hexon 1.0, 1.6 or 2.4 HyperD Diamond Nylon Ripstop 70D nylon ripstop
Construction Bridge style hammock made with one or two layers of 30D Nylon, bug net optional. End gathered, asymmetric hammock, single or double layer fabric, zipper along 1 side, integrated bug netting. Storage shelf and foot box 1.6 oz Hexon, end gathered, continuous loops 1.6oz HyperD Diamond Ripstop, end gathered, continuous loops Ripstop nylon, double interlocking stitching
Sizes / Colors 12 colors, 2 fabric layering options 27 colors, 3 fabric layering configurations 2 sizes/9 colors/3 fabrics, 31 printed patterns 1 size /5 colors, customizable options available 2 sizes, 4 colors
Measured Weight - Package (ounces) 36 oz hammock, whoopie sling suspension, bug net 27 oz hammock, bug net, webbing/buckle suspension 37 oz (double layer hammock, bug net, suspension) 26 oz 16 oz
Measured Weight - Hammock Only (ounces) 35 oz hammock, whoopie sling suspension, bug net 26 oz hammock, bug net, webbing/buckle suspension 25 oz (dbl layer) 15 oz 16 oz
Measured Weight - Hammock and Suspension (ounces) 35 oz hammock, whoopie sling suspension, bug net 26 oz hammock, bug net, webbing/buckle suspension 25 oz (dbl layer, webbing and beetle buckle suspension attached)) 20 oz (hammock, tree straps) 19 oz
Measured Weight - Shelter System (no stakes) 52 oz with Mini Fly tarp 42 oz with Mini Fly tarp N/A N/A 42 oz (hammock suspension, bug net, tarp)
Capacity (height) Up to 6' 4" 6' not stated not stated Not stated
Accessories (compatible, not included) Rain flies, bug net, carabiners, fish hooks, under quilts, top quilts, suspension systems Rain flies, bug net, carabiners, fish hooks, under quilts, top quilts, suspension systems Suspension straps, rain fly, bug net, top cover, side car pockets, ridgeline pockets Suspension straps, rain fly, top cover, side car pockets, ridgeline pockets, tree straps, underquilts, top quilts Suspension straps, Rain fly, bug net, gear sling, wider tree protection straps,
Accessories (included with hammock) Stuff sack, continuous loops (for attaching suspension system to) Guylines, bugnetting, storage shelf, continuous loops (for attaching suspension system to), stuff sack continuous loops, ridgeline continuous loops, ridgeline, bug net Continuous loops
Extra Accessories Tested Mini Fly tarp, bug net, double layer fabric, whoopie slings, tree straps Mini Fly tarp, webbing with buckles suspension, Body layer 2, Beetle Buckle suspension, asym bug net 10 ft. Tree straps Rain fly, ultralight suspension straps, bug net

Our Analysis and Test Results

Sleeping in a hammock can be a no-brainer for a back sleeper, but for those who aren't able to sleep in that position, things can get uncomfortable after a couple of hours. Most hammocks allow you to get into a diagonal position and achieve a decently flat side lay, but this usually only works on one side. If you want to turn over, you may find your face smashed against the fabric, and you can forget about laying on your stomach. But with the Ridgerunner, you are essentially in a floating cot, and a plethora of sleeping positions are readily available.

To sleep in style and in almost any position you want, take a close look at the Ridgerunner, our Top Pick for Side Sleeping. Setup is quick and easy, an optional double layer floor creates a sleeping pad sleeve, and an integrated bug net means you'll be safe from pesky insects. The Ridgerunner's use of spreader bars brilliantly marries the old school patio hammock design with cutting edge lightweight camping material, changing the game for die-hard side sleepers who want to hang under the stars.

Performance Comparison


The Warbonnet Ridgerunner is a go-to hammock for the best comfort and excellent protection in a suspended backcountry shelter.
The Warbonnet Ridgerunner is a go-to hammock for the best comfort and excellent protection in a suspended backcountry shelter.

Comfort


The Ridgerunner easily achieves top scores for comfort and is so special that we had to award it our Top Pick for Ultimate Comfort. The only models that come close to its comfort levels are the lay-flat ENO Skyloft and the large and asymmetrical Warbonnet Blackbird. The Skyloft has a spreader bar like the Ridgerunner, achieving a similar flat lay. The Blackbird is extremely roomy and utilizes a diagonal lay and a unique footbox to get a pretty flat sleeping surface.

However, only the models with spreader bars like the Ridgerunner and Skyloft, allow you to lay easily and comfortably on either side and, in the Ridgerunner, you can even lay on your stomachs! It feels more like being in a floating tent or cot than a hammock. The only position that doesn't work quite as well is the fetal position. Our smaller testers have enough width in this narrow hammock (3 feet wide), but folks over 6' may not have enough space for a full fetal position.

Some people will still prefer the asymmetrical design of many expedition camping hammocks, like the Blackbird, Dutchware Chameleon, Dream Hammock Sparrow, or the Hennessy Backpacker Ultralite. But, for those that don't mind carrying the extra weight of spreader bars, the Ridgerunner is a comfortable way to change up hammock camping and allow for some additional versatility.


As with all hammocks, if the suspension isn't appropriately tensioned, some odd things can happen. Hanging the Ridgerunner too tightly results in a less stable hammock. Sitting up when laying lengthwise can be tipsy and disorienting at night. You can improve this feeling by giving the hammock a little more sag and bending a leg (i.e., not sitting with your legs straight). Regardless of how you set it up, changing clothes in this model will likely result in some ground time.

Ok, the Ridgerunner is comfortable. You get it. But is there really that big of a difference? Yes, and here's why — the details of construction. At the head and foot end of this model, Warbonnet built in loose fabric. Typically in a hammock, you will find that the fabric gets tighter and tighter as you get to the ends. With the loose material in the Ridgerunner, you have room for a pillow or to rest your arms above your head. It also gives the hood and footbox of your sleeping bag room to keep its loft and maintain warmth.

To sleep in a hammock without your feet feeling pinned is a glorious experience for anyone used to end gathered hammock camping. Even in the Blackbird, which also has a footbox to give your feet more space, we still felt a little of the foot squeeze. There is absolutely none in the Ridgerunner. Warbonnet even sewed this model with tension in just right places to give you slight neck support while letting your head lie back in a flat position.

The addition of spreader bars in the Ridgerunner creates a wider  flatter sleeping surface that is comfortable for side sleepers too.
The addition of spreader bars in the Ridgerunner creates a wider, flatter sleeping surface that is comfortable for side sleepers too.

Another common point of discomfort in end gathered hammocks is the calf ridge, that spot when you get your diagonal lay on and are nice and flat, yet the tension is pulling a ridge of fabric up behind your calf. It's something that most hammock campers get used to but never love. The Ridgerunner completely eliminates the calf ridge!

So no calf ridge, no hyperextended knees, no squeezing of the head, feet, or arms, and a comfortable side and even stomach position… are you beginning to see what makes the Ridgerunner so special?

And don't forget about stomach sleepers!
And don't forget about stomach sleepers!

Weight


This is not a light hammock. While not exactly heavy, and still considerably lighter than many one person tents, the Ridgerunner weighs 35 ounces with its bug net and suspension. It's one of the heaviest of the hammocks we tested. Its full shelter weight with the Mini-Fly, whoopie sling and Dynaweave strap suspension, bug net, and double layer fabric comes to 52 ounces.

The extra weight is due to the 12-ounce spreader bars. These are not optional — without them, you'd be curled up in an oddly tensioned taco. You can use certain hiking poles in place of the bars but only if they have a tripod mount on top where you can screw in a little tip to attach them to the hammock. Be warned though, while we didn't try this, during our research, we read about snapping or suddenly shortening trekking poles, which aren't designed for this type of force.


Hammock weight and comfort are almost always inversely proportional, and this case is certainly no different. Sure, the Sea to Summit Ultralight is insanely light, but there's no bug net, and you won't be able to get even close to as comfortable as you can get in the Ridgerunner. You can drop a few ounces by purchasing the single layer Warbonnet, but if you're already committing to the weight of spreader bars, you might as well have the luxury of a sleeve for your sleeping pad.

If you aren't psyched about the weight or design of the Ridgerunner but you like the look and feature-heaviness it offers, check out the Warbonnet Blackbird. Its roomy, asymmetrical design also allows for excellent side sleeping (though more on one side than the other), and you will still get a bug net. You'll also get a weight savings of around 10 ounces, depending on which suspension and fabric you select.

Another great system if you are still looking to save more weight is the Hennessy Ultralite. It weighs in at only 32 ounces for the entire shelter, yet still boasts an asymmetrical design for added comfort.

Not a minimalist set up  but the stuff sacks are large enough that the tarp (brown bag) will easily stuff in with the hammock (green bag).
Not a minimalist set up, but the stuff sacks are large enough that the tarp (brown bag) will easily stuff in with the hammock (green bag).

Durability and Protection


The Ridgerunner is available from Warbonnet with a single or double-layer bottom. We tested both. The double-layer provides increased weight capacity and a sleeve for your sleeping pad so that it doesn't slip around and keep you up all night adjusting it, a feature we really appreciate.


Additionally, the Ridgerunner has an optional integrated bug net, so right out of the bag, you're protected from skeeters. The bug net stores away easily in a dedicated pocket if you don't need it, a nice feature that it shares with the REI Co-op Flash Air. It doesn't come with a tarp-like the Hennessy models, Flash Air, or the ENO SubLink Shelter System do, but Warbonnet offers a variety of tarps of varying sizes.

We tried out the Mini Fly and are big fans of the size and protection. In an effort to save weight, hammocks will often use smaller tarps that leave the user vulnerable to drafts and blowing rain. The beaks on the Mini Fly do an excellent job of keeping out blowing rain and the tarp is a good size, helping to block gusts of wind from the sides. Of the tarps we tested with our hammocks, only the tarp in the ENO Sublink compares in size. The Ridgerunner needs a wide tarp to cover the surface area created by its spreader bars. To prevent any abrasion, you'll need to stake out the sides of your tarp far enough that the pole tips won't rub up against the tarp's fabric when the hammock sways.

Warbonnet offers a variety of tarps that include a "beak" designed to overcome the unpleasant surprise of a wind shift that blows rain in the end. (Shown over the Ridgerunner)
Warbonnet offers a variety of tarps that include a "beak" designed to overcome the unpleasant surprise of a wind shift that blows rain in the end. (Shown over the Ridgerunner)

One small complaint we had is with the quality of the plastic clips used to clip up the bug netting. These appear to be glove clips but with one end cut off. The cut leaves a rough edge that we are concerned will catch on the lightweight material and tear it. Given the quality of every other element on the hammock, we were surprised that Warbonnet did not grind down this sharp edge. We looked into it on the hammock forums and found that others noticed the same thing, so we don't think it was a one-off mistake.

While the Ridgerunner is constructed from relatively thin 1.1oz/30D nylon and requires attention and care the same way a good quality tent does, we didn't feel the need to baby it. When purchasing the hammock, you can select a heavier fabric and a double layer option to increase durability; this also increases weight capacity. This hammock is well constructed, sturdy and, with proper care, should last years.

This hanging cot of a hammock is a great place to call home for a night or 20.
This hanging cot of a hammock is a great place to call home for a night or 20.

Ease of Set Up


The Ridgerunner is easy to set up but requires a few extra steps. Like the Blackbird, this hammock has a convenient double-sided stuff sack, allowing you to easily get pitched while keeping everything out of the dirt. The stuff sack is large, making it easy to pack the hammock away and giving you the option to stuff your tarp in with it. Simple straps and buckles make tensioning a breeze, and you can upgrade to whoopie slings if you want an even lighter suspension option.


After the hammock is hanging, you have to insert the spreader bars. The bars are comprised of two poles, a longer one for the head and a shorter one for the foot. The head pole breaks down into three pieces, and the foot pole into two. They are color-coded to make it easy to figure out which pole sections go together. From there, you insert the pole tips into steel buckles on either side of the hammock. While this is all very simple and straightforward, it is more to contend with and adds five separate pieces to your rig that you need to avoid losing.

The spreader bars are held in place by tips on either end and the tension of the hammock.
The spreader bars are held in place by tips on either end and the tension of the hammock.

Warbonnet offers two suspension choices, both are quick and easy to adjust and include 12 feet of material, giving you a wide range of set-up spans. The webbing system is the heavier of the two at 6.7 ounces and is almost dummy-proof in its simplicity — just reach around the tree and clip the carabiner back to the webbing.

It doesn't get much simpler than this.
The buckles on the webbing are easy to slide for quick adjustments.

The whoopie system is less intuitive, but once you get the hang of how to adjust them, it is a flash to hang and adjust. It weighs only 2.3 ounces, but we are disappointed in the Dynaweave tree strap's performance. After only one use it crumpled widthwise, rendering it unable to protect the trees any more than a rope would.

A wide strap is necessary to protect trees from damage but the Dynaweave strap is too thin  crumples up and no longer has that capability.

The one other step required to set up the Ridgerunner is to secure the shock cord attached to the integrated bug net. If you don't do this, you will have a bunch of netting laying on your face. This is as simple as attaching the cord at the head end to your anchor, slightly above wherever your suspension strap is. The cord on the foot end attaches directly to the base of the suspension or can be left unused.

Alternatively, you can put up a separate ridgeline for the bug net, which could also support a tarp. Again, this is a simple procedure, but it does require an extra step in regards to the bug net that the Blackbird, REI Flash Air, and Hennessy models do not.

The key to a restful hang in any hammock is finding the proper angle, and the Ridgerunner is no exception. Warbonnet recommends a 25-degree suspension angle when the hammock is weighted. They also recommend hanging the foot end about 12" higher than the head end. Although it looks like you will be laying upside down, this angle keeps your torso flat and your body from slowly scooching down during the night until your feet are jammed in the end. With the easy to adjust straps and some practice, we found this relatively quick and easy to achieve.

Notice the foot end of the hammock is above the head end yet the user is positioned completely flat.
Notice the foot end of the hammock is above the head end yet the user is positioned completely flat.

Versatility


The Ridgerunner is our Top Pick for Ultimate Comfort, so obviously we find it extremely versatile for getting ZZZ's! It's delightful to lay on your back, super comfortable on both sides, and is even comfortable for stomach sleeping! Having this many options in a camping hammock is practically unknown.

While cutting-edge expedition models like the Blackbird and the Hennessy Expedition Asym Zip or Hennessy Ultralite Backpacker offer asymmetrical designs to better allow for a flat diagonal lay and side sleeping, they generally feel much more comfortable and roomy on one side than the other, and stomach sleeping is really not an option at all. The spreader bars and dropped foot and headspaces on the Ridgerunner widen and flatten your sleeping area, creating more of a cot shape.


This model's bug net also has the unique ability to be stowed away in a special pocket at the foot of the hammock. This is a really nice feature, as it allows you to clear your side views from netting completely.

The Hennessy models we tested don't have a way to stow their bug nets other than to pull them over the ridgeline and off to the side. The Blackbird has ties on one side to help you collect and store the bug net, but doing this creates a slight obstruction in the view where the net is gathered up.

Two models that have a double-sided, zippered entry that also allows you to completely remove be bug nets from the system are the Dutchware Chameleon and Dream Hammock Sparrow.

The Grand Trunk Skeeter Beeter doesn't have a good way to remove the bug net at all, as it doesn't zip down to the ends and can't be flipped or tied back without adding your own system to do so. We really appreciated the versatility of models like the Ridgerunner and REI Flash Air with bug nets that unzip all the way down to your feet and can be tied into a dedicated pocket even though we can't completely remove the net to leave it at home. We also liked that these models also allow you to enter and exit both sides of the hammock.

With the bug netting tucked away  you can relax and take in the views then quickly zip yourself in when the evening bugs emerge.
With the bug netting tucked away, you can relax and take in the views then quickly zip yourself in when the evening bugs emerge.

The optional double layer of fabric is something we would like to see in any shelter hammock. Sleeping in a hammock with a sleeping pad usually results in a night of constant adjustment. When the pad is securely stowed in its own pocket, it stays in place and keeps you warm, allowing you to roll around all you want without losing it.

Slide in a pad for warmth. You will be able to hammock further into the fall or earlier in the spring without having to pack an underquilt.
Slide in a pad for warmth. You will be able to hammock further into the fall or earlier in the spring without having to pack an underquilt.

The rectangular underquilt we tested, the ENO Vulcan Underquilt, fits this model better than any other. While there are many underquilts on the market designed to fit many different hammock shapes and sizes, the simple rectangular shape makes the Ridgerunner easy for a DIYer to create their own.

Each side of the Ridgerunner has large saddlebag-like pockets. They hang on the outside of the hammock but are accessible from the inside when the bug net is zipped. The pockets are designed for users who want to be able to keep more than just the essentials at hand. You can fit books, Nalgene bottles, and shoes inside with ease. They are fully functional with or without the netting, though if the weight in them is unbalanced, it can flip the hammock over when you get out.

You can fit pretty much anything you want in the huge saddlebags on the Ridgerunner.
You can fit pretty much anything you want in the huge saddlebags on the Ridgerunner.

The Ridgerunner's versatility suffers somewhat due to its relatively low weight limits. At 200 lbs with the single-layer and 250 lbs in the double layer, this hammock is not for larger users, and our broad-shouldered testers felt a little confined. The hammock is long, listed as fitting folks up to 6'4" and our 6'2" testers felt like they had lots of space. For larger folks and those with broad shoulders, the spacious Blackbird XLC or Sea to Summit Pro will give much-appreciated space and a weight capacity of 350 to 400 lbs.

Except for the issue of weight and weight capacity, we found this to be a versatile hammock for camping. The only downside to the design is that it doesn't accommodate sitting sideways or sitting upright the way open, end gathered models like the Kootek or Sea to Summit Pro do.

We liked that the integrated bug net on the Ridgerunner could be zipped down to the end and stowed in a convenient pocket when not needed.
We liked that the integrated bug net on the Ridgerunner could be zipped down to the end and stowed in a convenient pocket when not needed.

Best Applications


The Ridgerunner is ideal for people who want to hammock camp but who struggle to sleep in a hammock. If you've ever wished that you could just float a little bed in space with all the right support in all the right places, then this might be your dream hammock. This model allows you to take all of the benefits of hammocking out into the backcountry while leaving the awkwardness of finding just the right diagonal position behind.

Value


No matter what options you select when purchasing the Ridgerunner, it's an investment, particularly since the suspension system is extra! But if you're serious about hammock camping and sleeping comfort is something that doesn't come easy to you, this is a small price to pay for countless restful nights in the backcountry. If side sleeping is in the "take-it-or-leave-it" category for you, check out the Blackbird instead. You'll get an innovative asymmetrical design for a superior flat diagonal lay, a footbox for extra roominess, an integrated bug net, and even an interior shelf for quite a bit less money.

Conclusion


The Ridgerunner, our Top Pick for Ultimate Comfort, is a solidly constructed hammock with an integrated bug net, large side gear pockets, and spreader bars to create a flat sleeping area conducive even to side and stomach sleeping. It's heavy for camping hammock, but if it means you'll sleep like a baby instead of waking up grouchy and with a stiff neck, we think it's worth its weight in ZZZ's.

Do we have to get up? It's so nice in here!
Do we have to get up? It's so nice in here!

With so many options available for modification from Warbonnet, we suggest watching their videos before making your purchase. They do a good job of breaking down their features and benefits to help you make an informed decision. These videos also provide helpful tips on setting up your hammock. You should see us stake out my tarp and coil our cord like an expert now!

Below are a few we found especially helpful as we got to know the Ridgerunner.

Ridgerunner Set Up




Webbing & Buckle Suspension




Whoopie Suspension




Elizabeth Paashaus and Penney Garrett