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Slumberjack Nightfall 2 Review

The unique design and really reasonable price of this tent have us finding new ways to enjoy it again and again
Slumberjack Nightfall 2
Photo: Slumberjack
Best Buy Award
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Price:  $159 List
Pros:  Setup with fly attached, flexible vestibule configuration, below average price
Cons:  Single door, can't remove fly while keeping tent pitched
Manufacturer:   Slumberjack
By Ben Applebaum-Bauch ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  May 2, 2019
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64
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#9 of 14
  • Comfort - 25% 7
  • Weight - 25% 5
  • Weather Resistance - 20% 8
  • Ease of Set-up - 10% 6
  • Durability - 10% 7
  • Packed Size - 10% 5

Our Verdict

The Slumberjack Nightfall 2 is an impressive tent with some definite upsides. It has a unique, exoskeleton design that puts the poles on the outside of the fly; this means that it can be pitched in the rain without getting the inside of the tent wet. It also comes with more space than its single door configuration and dimensions seem to suggest. Plus, even for a budget tent, it comes in at a below-average price, earning it a Best Buy Award. There are other roomier tents out there, but there are few that come with the intrigue of this model.

Compare to Similar Products

 
Awards Best Buy Award Editors' Choice Award Top Pick Award Top Pick Award Top Pick Award 
Price $159 List$159 List
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$139 List
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$200 List
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Pros Setup with fly attached, flexible vestibule configuration, below average priceTwo side doors, easy to pitch, large vestibulesLots of headroom, large vestibule, easy to pitchHeadroom, large tent doors, ventilationLightweight, easy to pitch
Cons Single door, can't remove fly while keeping tent pitchedHeavy, not so stable in high windPoles pinch together under fly tensionHeavy, unsteady in high wind, cheap stakesSmall interior, single door and vestibule
Bottom Line The unique design and really reasonable price of this tent have us finding new ways to enjoy it again and againThis basic tent is easy to set up and provides comfortable nights of camping on a budgetThis inexpensive tent is just a good as a 1P as it for twoThis spacious tent makes the most of its dimensions and offers plenty of features that will have you camping in comfortA budget tent for those who want to minimize weight and don't mind sacrificing a fair bit of comfort
Rating Categories Slumberjack Nightfa... REI Co-op Passage 2 REI Co-op Passage 1 The North Face Stor... Big Agnes C Bar 2
Comfort (25%)
7.0
8.0
8.0
9.0
4.0
Weight (25%)
5.0
6.0
6.0
4.0
9.0
Weather Resistance (20%)
8.0
7.0
7.0
8.0
7.0
Ease Of Set Up (10%)
6.0
9.0
9.0
9.0
8.0
Durability (10%)
7.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
7.0
Packed Size (10%)
5.0
5.0
5.0
4.0
8.0
Specs Slumberjack Nightfa... REI Co-op Passage 2 REI Co-op Passage 1 The North Face Stor... Big Agnes C Bar 2
Measured Packaged Weight 5.68 lbs 5.23 lbs 4.21 lbs 5.89 lbs 3.96 lbs
Floor Area 31.4 sq ft 31 sq ft 20 sq ft 30.5 sq ft 28 sq ft
Packed Size 6.5 x 21 in 8 x 18 in 7.5 x 17 in 7 x 22 in 6 x 19 in
Dimensions 85 x 52 x 39.5 in 88 x 52 in 88 x 36 in 87 x 50 x 43 in 86 x (52 x 42) x 41 in
Vestibule Area (Total) 9.3 sq ft 19 sq ft 9.5 sq ft 19 sq ft 7 sq ft
Peak Height 39.5 in 40 in 40 in 43 in 41 in
Number of Doors 1 2 1 2 1
Number of Poles 3 2 2 4 2
Pole Diameter Not provided 8.5 mm 8.5 mm Not provided Not provided
Number of Pockets 2 2 1 4 3
Gear Loft No No No No No
Pole Material 7001 aluminum Aluminum Aluminum Aluminum DAC pressfit aluminum
Guy Points 4 4 4 4 7
Rain Fly Material 68D polyester Polyester Polyester 68D lightweight polyester taffeta, 1200 mm PU Polyester taffeta
Inner Tent Material 40D Polyester No-See-Um Mesh Polyester Polyester 68D polyester taffeta, 1500 mm PU coating Polyester & mesh
Type Freestanding Freestanding Freestanding Two door, freestanding Freestanding

Our Analysis and Test Results

This tent is different from any other budget model that we tested. It has a vestibule that can be pitched out with trekking poles to create an excellent awning and its exterior-facing poles enable it to pitch under fly cover. It can even be pitched in fast-fly mode as is with no additional footprint. It's a Best Buy in our book, and we think the right kind of backpacker will think so too. The Nightfall 2 isn't the lightest or the easiest to set up, but its solid weather resistance, comfort, and durability keep it buoyed amongst the pack.

Performance Comparison


The Nightfall 2 really lets you set up shop and hunker down.
The Nightfall 2 really lets you set up shop and hunker down.
Photo: Ben Applebaum-Bauch

Comfort


This tent offers more in the way of comfort than it may initially seem. Six-foot sleepers had no problems with the amount of space this model provides on the floor. Its 52" width is average, but because the fly tensions so far away from the tent, it almost feels like there is a little extra space because there isn't the fear of pressing the tent wall against the fly (and getting wet from condensation).


The single door is less convenient than two side doors, but we found the tent to be wide enough that two people don't have to climb over each one another to get out. Along with this width though is the caveat that the zipper is going to be far away from someone, so it could be a bit of a reach across the other person's face if you have to get out in the middle of the night.

There is plenty of headroom, even for taller folks.
There is plenty of headroom, even for taller folks.
Photo: Ben Applebaum-Bauch

The vestibule is a good size but, again, because there is only one, fitting packs and footwear for two is a tight fit. The vestibule is also long, so the zipper is a far reach if you are trying to unzip it from the inside. That is, of course, unless you pitch out the vestibule into an awning (with the assistance of two trekking poles — or maybe the right-sized sticks). Then you have an awesome area that is outside of the tent but still protected.

The vestibule awning is awesome and creates a nice 'front porch' feel.
The vestibule awning is awesome and creates a nice 'front porch' feel.
Photo: Ben Applebaum-Bauch

Storage pockets leave a little something to be desired. There are two small ones, one in each corner of the head. They fit most small items that you would want to keep on hand, but the opening is even narrower than the pocket itself, meaning that folks with larger hands could find it annoying to reach into the bottom to grab a headlamp, for example.

The pockets are on the smaller side and have tiny openings that can...
The pockets are on the smaller side and have tiny openings that can make it difficult to reach items at the bottom.
Photo: Ben Applebaum-Bauch

Ease of Set-Up


The set up of this tent is somewhat unique but still fairly straightforward. The poles attach to the fly instead of to the tent. Each pole slides into a sleeve at the front end. Once they are secured in the grommets at each corner of the tent, there are clips on the backside that raise the tent up to maximum volume. Straight out of the bag, the tent and fly come connected so that speeds up set up time.


The exoskeleton pole structure with sleeves and clips on the outside...
The exoskeleton pole structure with sleeves and clips on the outside of the fly.
Photo: Ben Applebaum-Bauch
If you want to go into fast-fly mode by removing the tent body and using only the fly as cover, you just have to unhook the tent from the fly at several points and unclip the four corners. To roll out the awning mode of the vestibule takes just a little patience and practice. You have to adjust your trekking poles to the correct length then tension out the guylines (which we ended up just taking off of a couple of the guy points).

The tent (bottom) is connected to the fly (top) by a series of...
The tent (bottom) is connected to the fly (top) by a series of hanging loops/rods.
Photo: Ben Applebaum-Bauch

Weather Resistance


This tent performs well in the elements, and the fly tensions really nicely. Four guy points come with a pre-attached cord that increases the tent's stability in the wind. The other nice feature of the fly is that in addition to the front vestibule, the sides also stake far away from the tent body so that there is plenty of clearance and no splash back on the tent itself. In a storm, we also love that the fly and the tent are already attached so you can pitch the tent without getting the inside wet. One downside of this configuration is that ventilation is limited since you cannot remove the fly to have just the tent pitched.


There is great clearance between the sides of the fly and the tent...
There is great clearance between the sides of the fly and the tent body.
Photo: Ben Applebaum-Bauch

As much as we enjoy the tent awning, it does require some careful calibration in heavy rain. If it doesn't have any downward pitch, water will pool and sag the awning.

If you are not careful with the awning pitch, water will pool at the...
If you are not careful with the awning pitch, water will pool at the low point instead of running off the edge.
Photo: Ben Applebaum-Bauch

Durability


The Nightfall 2 has respectable durability, as well. The 68D floor and 66D fly are sufficiently burly. The stakes are lightweight but have a much more stable construction than most of the other budget tent stakes. They won't bend nearly as easily under a foot as a standard hook-shaped stake would. There are just a lot more connection points on this tent than most, which increases the possibility that one of them will fail at some point, but we never had any issues during testing.


These triangle stakes are a few notches up from the standard budget...
These triangle stakes are a few notches up from the standard budget tent hook models that bend very easily.
Photo: Ben Applebaum-Bauch

Our only headscratcher in terms of durability is the ends of the poles. Each time we broke down the tent and went to remove the poles from the grommets, a couple of the pole ends would pull out of the shafts. They are generally easy to snap back in because they are also attached to the elastic cord that runs through all of the pole segments, but when that elastic eventually wears out or snaps, it could just be an annoyance.

Our durability bummer -- the pole ends pull out easily from the rest...
Our durability bummer -- the pole ends pull out easily from the rest of the pole.
Photo: Ben Applebaum-Bauch

Weight & Packed Size


Coming in at 5 pounds, 10 ounces, this model is the second heaviest in the review.


It does come with the option of pitching without the tent body though, in which case it comes in at a very reasonable 3 pounds, 9 ounces.


The other benefit of the fast-fly mode is that the usable interior space all around is increased as well. Measuring 6.5" x 21" rolled up, the Nightfall 2 is bulkier than most.

The Slumberjack Nightfall 2 (middle) compared to two of the more...
The Slumberjack Nightfall 2 (middle) compared to two of the more compact contenders, the Big Agnes C Bar (left) and Sierra Designs Clip Flashlight 2.
Photo: Ben Applebaum-Bauch

Value


If you ask us, this model is a great price and an excellent value for what you get. It has the flexibility to pitch with or without the tent body (no extra footprint needed), and the vestibule awning only adds to its versatility. We think that this tent is fairly priced and wouldn't hesitate to make the purchase.

This tent can also be pitched in fast fly mode, opening up the space...
This tent can also be pitched in fast fly mode, opening up the space a bit more.
Photo: Ben Applebaum-Bauch

Conclusion


The unique design and versatility of the Slumberjack Nightfall 2 are intriguing. It earns a Best Buy Award for its performance combined with its low price. Though we are a little disappointed that the ability to pitch the tent body itself is directly connected to the fly, we have a great appreciation for its weather resistance. We think that this tent is a great value and is worth a strong look for the backpacker on a budget.

Ben Applebaum-Bauch