Reviews You Can Rely On

REI Co-op Trailbreak 60 Review

A fair price pack with familiar features that could work for a new backpacker to test the waters
REI Co-op Trailbreak 60
Photo: REI Co-op
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Price:  $150 List | $149.00 at REI
Pros:  Inexpensive, includes basic features, adjustable fit
Cons:  Padding digs in between shoulders, features could be executed better
Manufacturer:   REI Co-op
By Bennett Fisher ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Jun 2, 2021
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57
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#6 of 7
  • Suspension and Comfort - 45% 5
  • Weight - 20% 6
  • Features and Ease of Use - 20% 6
  • Adjustability - 15% 7

Our Verdict

The REI Trailbreak 60 is an affordable backpacking pack with the standard features you'd expect. It can handle loads around 20 to 30 pounds well and is a good beginner pack. The features included in this pack are nice, but none go above and beyond their standard function. The pack includes two water bottle pockets, a lid, sleeping pad strap, shove-it pocket, and bottom sleeping bag zipper access. If you need a basic pack that is adjustable for more than one family member or a growing youth, then this pack would be a great one to consider.

Compare to Similar Products

 
Awards  Editors' Choice Award Best Buy Award Best Buy Award Best Buy Award 
Price $149.00 at REICheck Price at Backcountry
Compare at 2 sellers
$199.00 at REICheck Price at Backcountry
Compare at 2 sellers
$79.99 at Amazon
Overall Score Sort Icon
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Star Rating
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Pros Inexpensive, includes basic features, adjustable fitHandles heavy loads well, adjustable, two large side zipper pockets, affordableLight-weight, comfortable, easily personalized, inexpensiveDurable, simple, zipper access to main compartment, inexpensive, water resistant, lightweightVery affordable, durable fabric
Cons Padding digs in between shoulders, features could be executed betterLid pocket is hard to access, side pockets can interfere with tall bottles, heavier than mostlacks durabillity, not made for heavy loadsNo lid, only available in one non-adjustable sizeUncomfortable, bulky straps and buckles, difficult to use pockets
Bottom Line A fair price pack with familiar features that could work for a new backpacker to test the watersOur favorite budget pack that features unique pockets and a high carry capacity, all at a great priceIt may not be a heavy load hauler, but for moderate loads, this pack is comfortable and has an amazing set of features, all at a great priceA great option for the hiker that wants a simple, lightweight pack capable of carrying moderate loadsThis is an inexpensive pack that can get the job done if you look past its shortcomings
Rating Categories REI Co-op Trailbrea... Kelty Coyote 65 REI Co-op Flash 55 Mountainsmith Screa... Teton Sports Scout...
Suspension And Comfort (45%)
5.0
9.0
7.0
7.0
4.0
Weight (20%)
6.0
5.0
10.0
9.0
5.0
Features And Ease Of Use (20%)
6.0
8.0
9.0
8.0
4.0
Adjustability (15%)
7.0
8.0
5.0
3.0
6.0
Specs REI Co-op Trailbrea... Kelty Coyote 65 REI Co-op Flash 55 Mountainsmith Screa... Teton Sports Scout...
Measured Weight (pounds) 3.7 lbs 4.3 lbs 2.6 lbs 3.0 lbs 4.5 lbs
Volume (liters) 60 L 65 L 55 L 55 L 55 L
Access Top Top Top Top and zipper Top
Hydration Compatible Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Materials Ripstop nylon Poly 420D Small Back Stafford Main body: 100D ripstop nylon
Bottom: 420D nylon
210D Robic HT nylon with Alkex, 210D nylon embossed liner 600D Diamond Ripstop / 600D PU
Sleeping bag Compartment Yes Yes No No Yes

Our Analysis and Test Results

The REI Trailbreak 60 is a basic pack that will check all of the boxes for your upcoming overnight hike. It has most of the features one might like in a backpack but doesn't offer much of a wow factor. It comes in at a reasonable price, making this pack an option for someone wanting to test the waters of backpacking before making a big financial commitment.

Performance Comparison


The REI Trailbreaker shows that you don't need to break the bank for...
The REI Trailbreaker shows that you don't need to break the bank for a decent backpack.
Photo: Bennett Fisher

Suspension and Comfort


This pack is fairly comfortable under light loads, but for its weight, we expected a bit more comfort. The biggest downside of this pack is that it adjusts for height with a rigid foam block right between the shoulder blades. We tried to adjust it to fit better, but no matter what height it was at, we wished it could be a little lower. This foam position led to an uncomfortable ride that relieved us when it was time to put on a different pack.

The padding for the pack is rigid and spaced out creating a less...
The padding for the pack is rigid and spaced out creating a less comfortable ride
Photo: Bennett Fisher

Other than the upper padding, the lower padding is also rather stiff and narrow, not adding a glove-like fit but rather a firm pressure. The weight transfer worked rather well but couldn't help this pack over the offsets of the cushioning.

Looking closely, you can see sky through the other side showing how...
Looking closely, you can see sky through the other side showing how little of the pack actually touches your back
Photo: Bennett Fisher

Weight


Coming in at 3.7 pounds, the Trailbreak 60 is around average for this review lineup. The fabric shove-it pocket and beefy sleeping bag access zipper illustrate the direction this pack is heading. While these features may help the pack last longer, they do add up to a heavier pack.

The bottom opening's zipper teeth and storm flap are thick adding to...
The bottom opening's zipper teeth and storm flap are thick adding to the weight of this pack
Photo: Bennett Fisher

Features and Ease of Use


With most of the features of a standard pack these days, the best one it has to offer is the slanted water bottle pockets that allow convenience while walking down the trail. On the flip side, most stretch pockets are directly below the side compression straps up on the pack. That isn't the case for this pack, so there is no way to secure tent poles or trekking poles on the side with confidence.

The water pockets are slanted for easy access but there is no catch...
The water pockets are slanted for easy access but there is no catch for tall items like tent poles, so there is a risk they could fall out.
Photo: Bennett Fisher

The pack offers a bottom sleeping bag zipper access with a detachable internal flap to separate the compartment. It comes with a slightly stretchy shove-it front pocket that isn't elastic mesh making it more durable but less useful for large items.

The lid is a great size for all of those need-it-now items like headlamps and toiletries. The hip belt pockets are a good size for a few bars or sun protection items.

Adjustability & Fit


As mentioned in the Comfort section, we found the adjustment feature on this pack to miss the mark. While it can be adjusted to fit torsos 17 to 21 inches in a reasonably simple slide-through design, the padding that moves with the shoulder straps is uncomfortable against the back. This pack does well with its adjustment range, but we enjoy the back-to-pack comfort of others in the review more.

Adjusting the packs torso length is a accomplished by rethreading...
Adjusting the packs torso length is a accomplished by rethreading the padding through webbing straps.
Photo: Bennett Fisher

Value


We found this pack to be okay for the price. It has all of the features one would look for in a backpacking pack these days but lacks extra comfort. If it had one feature like weight or unique pocket structure, we could possibly overlook the firm back padding, but there are better packs in the review at the same price as it stands.

The front semi-stretch pocket is a great place to store those...
The front semi-stretch pocket is a great place to store those bulkier items.
Photo: Bennett Fisher

Conclusion


The REI Trailbreak 60 could be a good pack for a kid that could outgrow a more expensive pack. It has many features you can find on packs in our main backpack review at half the price, which would be suitable for someone wanting to get into backpacking with the intent to upgrade. When upgrading, most of the features would feel familiar, making it an easy transition.

Bennett Fisher