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Shimano GR9 Review

These are hard riding all around shoes for aggressive riding
Editors' Choice Award
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Price:  $160 List | $160.00 at Competitive Cyclist
Compare prices at 2 resellers
Pros:  Super grippy soles, sturdy construction, quick drying
Cons:  Expensive, hotter than other shoes
Manufacturer:   Shimano
By Jason Cronk ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Jun 23, 2020
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79
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#2 of 12
  • Grip - 30% 8
  • Comfort and arch support - 25% 9
  • Rigidity and Power Transfer - 20% 7
  • Breathability - 10% 6
  • Durability - 10% 9
  • Weight - 5% 7

Our Verdict

The Shimano GR-9 is a burly shoe made for aggressive enduro and downhill riding with a tenaciously grippy sole, speed lacing with a cover, and great power transfer to the pedals. Even though the shoe is more DH oriented (the "GR" is Shimano's Gravity line), it still performs well when you're pedaling through rolling terrain. The shoe features an overall lower volume fit that still maintains plenty of wiggle room in the toe box. They are a bit toasty on warm sunny days in the black color option, so you may consider the navy blue if you ride in a hot locale. These shoes are sure to please even the hardest of chargers no matter where the trail takes you.

Compare to Similar Products

Our Analysis and Test Results

After racking up the miles through dusty desert trails, long gravel rides, and high alpine cold weather rides, these shoes stood out as a favorite with testers. Even though these babies are oriented to enduro and downhill riders, we found they rode as well or better than other shoes geared more for XC riding. These shoes are built with a low volume fit that may not fit everyone, but if the shoe fits…wear it!

Performance Comparison


The GR9's midsole provides a stable connection between rider and pedals.
The GR9's midsole provides a stable connection between rider and pedals.

Grip


When it comes to pedal grip, Shimano got it right with the GR-9. Rather than coming up with their own in-house proprietary rubber compounds, Shimano has chosen to outfit their riding shoes with rubber from the proven tire manufacturer Michelin.

Where many shoe manufacturers go with the familiar sticky dot sole patterns, the soles of the GR-9 have a finer yet more aggressive tread. The spacing of the lugs is pretty tight through the majority of the sole, including the key pedal contact zone. We found the narrow openings between lugs allow pedal pins to really mesh with the sole of the shoes, which creates a good positive pedal grip. The spacing also enables easier fine-tuning of foot position while riding.

For those riders who are fortunate enough to ride in areas with trickier technical terrain that requires occasional hike a bike fun, the soles of the GR-9 won't let you down. The majority of the sole's lugs seemed like more than enough for grabbing steep trails, rocks, and roots while off the bike. The tread pattern immediately under the toe and heel of the shoe features larger and even more aggressive lugs that provide plenty of bite for hiking. We also found the nature of the sole pattern and lug shape made the soles of these shoes self clean pretty effectively rather than staying plugged up with mud.

With good effective grip both on and off the bike, these shoes are up for anything you may throw at them.


The GR9 provides a tenacious grip both on and off the bike.
The GR9 provides a tenacious grip both on and off the bike.

A shoe that instills confidence is essential for high speed downhill cruising.
A shoe that instills confidence is essential for high speed downhill cruising.

Comfort and Arch Support


Right out of the box, you can see the substantial padding that's built into the GR-9, particularly around the asymmetric ankle, the molded toe reinforcement, and also the well-padded tongue. This shoe is also equipped with a removable insole with built-in arch support and a speed lace system that appears solidly put together.

When we initially put this pair on, we noticed that they are made for riders with lower volume feet. Our lead tester, who has an average foot, but has some residual swelling in his right foot some days due to the after effects of a compound tibia/fibula fracture, found that the lace cover barely closed securely after pulling the speed lace snug. This may not be a factor for a lot of riders, but is something to keep in mind, especially for rides with higher volume or wider feet.

Where some flat pedal shoes feel like a well-worn street shoe out of the box, the GR-9's have a noticeably stiffer feel. We didn't notice any pinching at the arch as we've found with other shoes, but just that these have a stiffer feel overall. As the miles and altitude passed by, we noticed the extra support kept our foot comfort high and made the shoes feel like actual protective equipment versus just simple footwear.


The speed lace system with shield was a hit.
The speed lace system with shield was a hit.

Weight


With a verified weight of 13 ounces for a men's size medium, these shoes are surprisingly light for just how substantial they feel when you put them on. That's not to say they feel heavy, just that you'd expect more mass for such a protective shoe.


The GR-9 on the scale.
The GR-9 on the scale.

Rigidity and Power Transfer


After reading about the solid and burly construction of these shoes, you might be inclined to think they're going to be a super stiff shoe, and you'd be kind of right. In comparison to some of the more casual flat shoes we've ridden, the GR-9's definitely possess more rigidity, but when compared to the entire field, they're actually in the middle. Shimano rates the sole stiffness of all their cycling shoes on a scale of 1-10 and they rate these at a 3 out of 10, putting them on the more flexible/walkable side of their ratings. After riding and hiking in these shoes, we'd agree with their rating. The GR-9, like the other high-performance shoes in our lineup, is made with an EVA midsole that increases stiffness and protects the foot from impacts. These shoes are more than capable of cranking hard on the uphill and flats as well as the downhill, and we found they transfer plenty of power to the pedal no matter where we rode, even doing paved out of the saddle sprints on a gravel bike.


Grippy Michelin soles and a reasonably rigid sole construction makes the climbs easier.
Grippy Michelin soles and a reasonably rigid sole construction makes the climbs easier.

Breathability


When evaluating the breathability of these shoes, it was a mixed bag. Initially, after pulling the speed laces snug and starting to pedal, we didn't notice any significant change in the perceived temperature of the shoe. But after riding just a short time, we noticed these shoes made our feet feel warmer than other shoes, especially the models that are built with mesh ventilation panels. This was especially apparent when riding in open terrain on completely sunny days, likely due to the black color. Even though we thought we may experience some serious swamp foot, the temperature did equalize, and dozens of ventilation holes seemed to do the trick in keeping foot temperature and humidity levels at a pretty average level in comparison. So with all of that in mind, if you tend to ride in hotter and sunnier places, you may want to consider checking out the navy blue option.


Other than a little on the warm side  these shoes kept this tester's feet comfy after 20 miles of gravel grinding fun.
Other than a little on the warm side, these shoes kept this tester's feet comfy after 20 miles of gravel grinding fun.

Durability


We expected the durability level to be pretty high with the GR-9's and after testing wrapped up, we weren't disappointed. The lugged Michelin soles showed likely the least amount of tread wear we've yet experienced. The upper's synthetic materials showed just a couple tiny superficial scuffs, and the speed lace system came through completely unscathed too. We can't see into the future, but it sure looks like this pair of shoes is in for several seasons of heavy use.


A closer view of the high grip Michelin soles after a dirty day.
A closer view of the high grip Michelin soles after a dirty day.

Value


This pair is on the high side of the price spectrum, but for hard-charging riders who take on everything, these shoes should provide a good value with their modern design and durability.

Conclusion


The Shimano GR-9 is an advanced level shoe that is oriented to gravity riders but is more than capable of holding its own on the climb as well as the super chunky downhill.

Jason Cronk