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Five Ten Freerider Pro Review

This was the favorite shoe for some and not others. Overall it was the most versatile on and off the bike.
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Price:  $135 List | $104.99 at Competitive Cyclist
Compare prices at 3 resellers
Pros:  Great durability and power transfer, look good on and off the bike
Cons:  Expensive, not as sticky as the Freerider Contact
Manufacturer:   Five Ten
By Jason Cronk ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Sep 6, 2019
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75
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#6 of 11
  • Grip - 30% 9
  • Comfort and Arch Support - 25% 7
  • Rigidity and Power Transfer - 20% 8
  • Breathability - 10% 3
  • Durability - 10% 9
  • Weight - 5% 5

Our Verdict

The Freerider Pro features a burly synthetic upper, ample protection for all conditions riding, and a tried and true Dotty S1 rubber sole. It's sure to please most riders, from casual weekend riders to aggressive enduro riders and everyone in between.

Our testing team is split on this shoe. For some, it was the favorite while others much preferred the or top-rated Freerider Contact. What is undeniable is how good looking and versatile this shoe is. We used it for bike commuting, around town and even on moderate hikes (it has some traction but is pretty slippery, especially when the tread gets worn.) If you want one shoe to do about everything in, this is it. It was also incredibly durable, which made swallowing the price tag a little easier. That said, it didn't score as high as other shoes in our test.


Compare to Similar Products

 
Awards  Editors' Choice Award  Editors' Choice Award Best Buy Award 
Price $104.99 at Competitive Cyclist
Compare at 3 sellers
$140 List$114.97 at Competitive Cyclist
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$104.93 at REI
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$100 List
Overall Score Sort Icon
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76
Star Rating
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Pros Great durability and power transfer, look good on and off the bikeSupportive, ankle protection, great grip, good protection from elementsSuper comfortable, good pedal grip, solid durabilityUnbeatable grip with ability to escape pedals, lightweightGood grip, quality construction, low price
Cons Expensive, not as sticky as the Freerider ContactHotter than other shoes during warm weather, expensiveLess grip than Five Ten's solesQuestionable sole durabilityLess grip than others, less breathability
Bottom Line This was the favorite shoe for some and not others. Overall it was the most versatile on and off the bike.A solid choice for riders of all abilities from beginner to expert with a great sticky sole and thoughtful extra featuresSolid performance in an all mountain shoeA shoe that begs to be ridden long days and keep the technical terrain coming!A high quality all around shoe from an up and coming company
Rating Categories Five Ten Freerider Pro ION Raid AMP II Shimano GR7 Five Ten Freerider Contact Ride Concepts Livewire
Grip (30%)
10
0
9
10
0
10
10
0
8
10
0
10
10
0
9
Comfort And Arch Support (25%)
10
0
7
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
8
10
0
8
Rigidity And Power Transfer (20%)
10
0
8
10
0
8
10
0
8
10
0
8
10
0
6
Breathability (10%)
10
0
3
10
0
6
10
0
7
10
0
6
10
0
6
Durability (10%)
10
0
9
10
0
8
10
0
9
10
0
6
10
0
8
Weight (5%)
10
0
5
10
0
5
10
0
5
10
0
6
10
0
6
Specs Five Ten Freerider... ION Raid AMP II Shimano GR7 Five Ten Freerider... Ride Concepts...
Rubber Type Stealth S1 Suptraction Soul FL Michelin Stealth Mi6 Kinetics DST6.0 High Grip
Rubber Pattern Full Dot Full Tread Full Tread Half Dot Full Dot
Weight in Oz 14 14 14 13.75 13.75
Narrow or Wide Fit? Narrow Narrow Narrow Wide Wide
Upper Materials Synthetic Leather Polyurethane/mesh Perforated synthetic with mesh Textile/synthetic leather Synthetic/mesh

Our Analysis and Test Results

The Five Ten Freerider Pro is packed with all of the things Five Ten is known for. Top-quality, durable and quick-drying synthetic uppers, a medium volume fit, tenaciously sticky Dotty S1 rubber soles, and they even threw in a lace keeper. The Freerider Pro may be the answer for riders seeking an all-around shoe that is capable of handling anything you throw at 'em.

Performance Comparison


The Freerider Pro had excellent power transfer and pedal traction. It's a little less sticky than the Freerider Contact.
The Freerider Pro had excellent power transfer and pedal traction. It's a little less sticky than the Freerider Contact.

Grip


For years now, when it comes to the world of mountain bike flat shoes, Five Ten has seemed to set the standard by which all other shoes' soles are measured. Five Ten's history in the world of ultra-sticky climbing shoes shows in their mountain bike shoes. The Five Ten Freerider Pro is equipped with a full Dotty S1 rubber outsole that provides a vice grip-like hold on the pedal pins. Although the holding power of the Freerider Pro gave this shoe a 9 out of 10 Grip rating, we did notice one subtle thing after wearing the Pros for a couple of rides. When one of our riders was standing on flat ground, something felt "off". After examining the shoes, we found that one of the soles had a slight defect, a noticeable wave in the sole. It was minor enough, but still noticeable. See the photo below. For riders seeking more flexibility in the ability to adjust foot positions while still feeling locked on, a shoe like the Five Ten Freerider Contact or Ride Concepts Livewire may prove a better choice for you. But for riders who prefer that almost completely locked in feel, similar to that of a clipless shoe/pedal combo, the Five Ten Freerider Pro could be your shoe of choice for all your riding needs.


The grippiest rubber  S1
The grippiest rubber, S1
Sticky soles  but a little warp in our test pair
Sticky soles, but a little warp in our test pair

Comfort


Our first impression out of the box was that the Five Ten Freerider Pro felt familiar. The Pro has a medium volume fit that increases to a wider foot box from the ball of the foot forward. Before discussing more on fit, we just wanted to comment on another out of the box bonus. It may not contribute directly to comfort, but we really appreciated the stretchy lace keeper, much like the Ion Raid Amp II. Once we got the Pro laced up, we noticed both similarities and differences with other Five Ten shoes. The overall fit of the shoe was similar to the Five Ten Freerider Contact with the medium fit and generous toe box. The shoe seems to be padded in all the right places, although the Freerider Contact has a bit more padding in key areas like around the ankle. One additional bonus padded area is in the Poron foam lining of the toe for extra protection from impacts. The foam is the same type found in other protective gear, like elbow and knee pads, that hardens on impact. The synthetic upper is durable, but this may come at a price. We noticed the Five Ten Freerider Pro felt pretty stiff initially and we wondered if it would soften. After testing, we found the material didn't change much and remained stiff, which created an uncomfortable crease and subsequent pressure across the top of the foot. Maybe they'll soften in the long term? We found that when riding in rainy and snowy conditions, the Pro's uppers repelled moisture well and dried quickly after things dried out. After riding a bit, we didn't notice any pedal pressure through the shoe, thanks to the man molded EVA midsole and the orthotic style insole. Again, there are trade-offs, though. While the stiffness keeps the feet protected, other shoes like the Five Ten Freerider make walking a little easier. If you don't find yourself walking in your bike shoes much, this won't be an issue.


A sturdy and weather resistant choice for all mountain riding
A sturdy and weather resistant choice for all mountain riding

Rigidity and Power Transfer


As we touched on above in "Comfort," the Five Ten Freerider Pro is definitely on the stiffer side of things. That stiffness translates into great power transfer between the legs and wheels. On longer rides that translates to greater efficiency, fresher feet and legs, and more fun! We rode multi-hour test rides in the Pros and were happy with their rigidity and efficiency, much like its sibling, the Five Ten Freerider Contact and theGiro Riddance. Just keep in mind if you spend much time off the bike that this rigidity makes hiking a little tougher than the Contact or Riddance.


The all-important connection between rider and pedal
The all-important connection between rider and pedal

Weight


Once we put the Five Ten Freerider Pro on the scale, we found the shoe weighed in right in the neighborhood of all our test subjects, right at 14oz. For our gram counting riders out there, weight won't be a deciding factor for you.


+/- 14 ounces seems to be the right number
+/- 14 ounces seems to be the right number

Breathability


When we first started riding in our test shoes this spring, breathability wasn't an issue, but once we started riding in the high Nevada desert on days warmer than 75F or so, things heated up. With even light riding socks, we noticed our feet heating up on rides with more climbing or a faster pace. As you'd expect with a super beefy and durable upper, breathability isn't the main strength of the Five Ten Freerider Pro. The Pro is equipped with several small pinhole sized perforations across the toe for ventilation. Where other shoes like the Ride Concepts Livewire or Five Ten Freerider Contact utilize generous amounts of breathable mesh, the Pro is made with just the durable synthetic upper material throughout. On cooler days or warmer days on shorter rides, we didn't notice any issues with breathability, but on when the temperature or tempo increased, we felt our feet heating up. For riders in cooler climates or for those who do a lot of shuttle riding, the lower degree of breathability won't be an issue, but for riders in hotter climates or those who rack up serious miles, a better-ventilated shoe may be the way to go.


This shoe would be good choice for riders in cooler and wetter locations.

We didn't rate these shoes on style. If we had  the Freerider Pro would have come out on top  especially in this blue color.
We didn't rate these shoes on style. If we had, the Freerider Pro would have come out on top, especially in this blue color.

Durability


With the trail-proven Dotty S1 rubber combined with a super tough upper and the reinforced toe, the Five Ten Freerider Contact looks like it's in for seasons of use and abuse. Starting with the sole, aside from the already proven materials, Five Ten has addressed delamination issues that occurred in the past. Some pairs of the Five Ten Freerider Contact experienced some sole delamination and Five Ten seems to have come up with the answer by going with the S1 rubber vs. Mi6 rubber and also by stitching the toe. After miles of dirt, rocks, and even snow, we noticed almost no wear to the soles of the Pro. We only noted minor marks from pedal pins, similar to that of the Ride Concepts Livewire. Moving on to the uppers of the shoe, we found almost no signs of wear there either, with the exception of some superficial scratches from a poky chunk of granite that we rode a bit close to. If durability is a concern to you, look no further, the Five Ten Freerider Pro has got you covered!

The Freerider Pro also performs well in the skatepark.
The Freerider Pro also performs well in the skatepark.

John T enjoying some after test beverages
John T enjoying some after test beverages

Value


With a $135 price tag, the Five Ten Freerider Pro is near the top of our test when it comes to cost. With the durable construction and a likely long lifespan, perhaps it's worth it?

Conclusion


For the all-around rider who is looking for a substantial yet low profile shoe with tenacious Five Ten grip, check out the Five Ten Freerider Pro!

While the Freerider Pro looks like a more casual shoe  we were impressed with the performance. It also did better at short hikes than the Freerider Contact due to its complete dot sole (the Contact has no traction in the ball of your foot).
While the Freerider Pro looks like a more casual shoe, we were impressed with the performance. It also did better at short hikes than the Freerider Contact due to its complete dot sole (the Contact has no traction in the ball of your foot).


Jason Cronk