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DMR Vault Review

This pedal gets the job done but does not stand out in a crowded field of competitors
DMR Vault
Credit: Jeremy Benson
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Price:  $140 List | $119.29 at Amazon
Pros:  Smooth spin, foot mobility, interchangeable pins
Cons:  Less grippy, weight, price
Manufacturer:   DMR
By Tara Reddinger-Adams ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  May 18, 2022
Our Editors independently research, test, and rate the best products. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Learn more
73
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#12 of 16
  • Grip and Traction - 25% 7.0
  • Platform - 25% 8.0
  • Mobility - 20% 8.0
  • Servicing - 15% 7.0
  • Weight - 15% 6.0

Our Verdict

The DMR Vault gets lost in the increasingly competitive field of flat pedals. It performs well on the bike but does not stand out or perform exceptionally well in any metric. The concave 6061 aluminum platform measures 105mm x 105mm which is slightly smaller than many newer designed pedals on the market and has good stability for riders with a smaller foot. The grip is unremarkable but does have good mobility. The price tag is on the more expensive end of the spectrum, though these may be a compelling option for riders who prefer a moderate-size platform and a little foot mobility.

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$119.29 at Amazon
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Overall Score Sort Icon
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Star Rating
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Pros Smooth spin, foot mobility, interchangeable pinsGreat grip, easy to service, large platform, quality construction, smooth rotationTremendous amount of grip, reasonable price tag, easy to service, versatile, large platformExcellent price point, well-rounded performance, service kits readily availableTough and durable, won’t break the bank, good mid-range size
Cons Less grippy, weight, priceExpensiveLimited foot mobility, almost too much grip, convex shape may not be for everyoneConvex shape might be polarizing, not the grippiestSmaller platform and only 8 traction pins, no traction pins along the spindle
Bottom Line This pedal gets the job done but does not stand out in a crowded field of competitorsThis top-performing pedal has great grip, a well-rounded performance, and is a great choice for a variety of terrainA versatile flat pedal that delivers outstanding on-trail performance at a competitive priceA well-rounded and effective composite pedal at an unbelievable price pointOverall an affordable, well-built, and durable pedal that will last a long time
Rating Categories DMR Vault Race Face Atlas Pedal OneUp Components Al... OneUp Components Co... Race Face Chester
Grip and Traction (25%)
7.0
9.0
9.0
7.0
7.0
Platform (25%)
8.0
9.0
8.0
8.0
7.0
Mobility (20%)
8.0
9.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
Servicing (15%)
7.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
7.0
Weight (15%)
6.0
7.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
Specs DMR Vault Race Face Atlas Pedal OneUp Components Al... OneUp Components Co... Race Face Chester
Measured Weight per pair (g) 423 g 383 g 370 g 359 g 358 g
Traction Pins (per side) 11, flip pins 10, bottom loading, adjustable height 10, 3 mm hex head bottom loading 10, 2.5 mm hex head bottom loading 8, 2.5 mm hex head bottom loading
Platform Dimensions (mm) 105 mm x 105 mm 111 mm x 107 mm 114 mm x 104 mm 114 mm x 104 mm 110 mm x 101 mm
Platform Profile (mm) - not including pins 17.6 mm at edges,16.8 at axle 14.8mm leading and trailing edges, 12.8mm at axle 8.8 mm leading and trailing edges, 12.1 mm at axle 13.8 mm leading and trailing edges, 16.9 mm at axle 14 mm leading and trailing edges, 17 mm center of spindle
Concavity 1 mm difference from effective edges to middle of axle 1mm from edges to axle slight convexity slight convexity 3 mm difference from effective edges to center of pedal
Q Factor / Distance from cranks to furthest pin 113mm 117mm 107.6 mm 106 mm 103 mm
Bearings High load DU bushing and cratridge bearing 6802 sealed cartridge bearing 4 double-sealed cartridge bearings DU cartridge Cartridge bearings and DU bushings
Body Material 6061 Aluminum 6061 Aluminum Forged 6061-T6 aluminum Nylon Composite Nylon Composite
Pedal Wrench Type 6mm 8mm 8 mm hex 15 mm pedal spanner, 6 mm hex 15 mm pedal spanner, 8 mm hex

Our Analysis and Test Results

The Vault is a long-standing favorite pedal for many riders. In our testing we found the grip to be unremarkable, especially in comparison to other pedals in our line-up. The Vault has a smaller concave platform of only 105mm x 105mm and is stable and supportive underfoot, especially for riders with smaller feet. Because the pins are not super grippy, there is more foot mobility with the Vault than other pedals, which some riders may enjoy. With flat pedals becoming lighter, thinner, and having adjustable height pins the Vault seems rather unexceptional. It certainly gets the job done and is well made but lacks the grip and servicing ease found in pedals of a similar price.

Performance Comparison


DMR Vault mountain bike flat pedals - these pedals use a 6mm hex to install.
These pedals use a 6mm hex to install.
Credit: Tara Reddinger-Adams

Grip and Traction


During our testing, the grip of the Vault was less than that of the top performers in our review. The Vault uses their Flippin design, this design has shorter pins near the axle of the pedal and longer pins at the outside edges. These pins can be moved around or flipped to help you dial in the grip for your preferences. The 11 Flippin’s line the perimeter of the platform and there are no pins on the axle.

DMR uses shorter pins nearest the axle of the Vault. It has a concave design with longer pins at the leading and trailing edges, which help the foot to conform more to the shape of the pedal. When we tested with different pedals on each side of the crank, the differences in grip became pronounced with the Vault having less grip than the pedal on the opposite side of the bike. We also rode the Vaults with a variety of shoes that all have a different outsole, including MAX GRIP from Ride Concepts, Giro’s Tack Rubber, and Vibram rubber on Bontrager shoes. We had trouble finding our “sweet spot” for foot placement and noticed our feet sliding on the pedals with shoes from both Ride Concepts and Bontrager.

DMR Vault mountain bike flat pedals - the pins come installed with the taller side on the leading and...
The pins come installed with the taller side on the leading and trailing edges and the short side on either side of the axle.
Credit: Tara Reddinger-Adams

Platform


The Vault’s platform measures 105mm x 105mm and in our testing did not hang up in rock pinches as much as other pedals in our test. It has a chamfered edge design meaning it can glance off of rocks more easily.

Between the axle and the leading edge, there is a 38mm gap and between the axle and the trailing edge the gap is only 30mm. This smaller gap helps support the foot since there is a smaller void which also reduces the need for a brace from the axle to the perimeter of the pedal body.

The Vault has a slight concave design that measures 17.6mm at the leading and trail edges and 16.8mm at the axle. Our testers with a size EU40 shoe find the Vault’s platform size to be very comfortable and stable and because of their smaller width, we also experienced far fewer pedal strikes because our shoe covers the entire platform.

DMR Vault mountain bike flat pedals - the platform measures 105mm x 105mm and is supportive of our size eu...
The platform measures 105mm x 105mm and is supportive of our size EU 40 shoe.
Credit: Byron Adams

Mobility


DMR uses a high load DU bushing and cartridge bearing on the Vault which spins smoothly and predictably. We were able to quickly reposition our foot when it slipped off the pedal and did not have to worry about it spinning out of the way. The rotation on the crank is not super fast and has some drag to it, making it easier to put your foot back on if it slips off.

Our feet were not glued to the pins of the pedals, making adjustments easier than with other pedals. For those who want a little less pedal traction the Vault is a good choice because of its mobility and smooth and predictable spin.

DMR Vault mountain bike flat pedals - the pins can be flipped around to change up the grip.
The pins can be flipped around to change up the grip.
Credit: Tara Reddinger-Adams

Servicing


Accessing the Vault’s 4140 Chromoly steel axle involves a few more steps and a few more tools than the easiest pedals to service in our test. You’ll need a 6mm hex and an 8mm socket with a handle to service the axle. After removing the end cap, you’ll need to insert the 6mm hex into the spindle and the 8mm socket onto the nut. The nut is inside the axle but not so deep to require an extension on the socket and after a few ratchets or rotations, the axle will be free from the pedal body.

DMR Vault mountain bike flat pedals - once the end cap is removed, you need a socket to remove the nut.
Once the end cap is removed, you need a socket to remove the nut.
Credit: Tara Reddinger-Adams

Weight


At 423-grams per pair the Vault is certainly towards the heavier end of the spectrum of pedals in our test. Given the smaller platform, we would expect them to be a bit lighter weight.

DMR Vault mountain bike flat pedals - these are a tad on the heavy side for the size of their platform.
These are a tad on the heavy side for the size of their platform.
Credit: Tara Reddinger-Adams

Value


The Vault is one of the more expensive pedals in our test. When taking price into consideration, we feel there are similarly priced options that perform better and represent a better value.

Conclusion


When we compare the performance of the DMR Vault to other pedals in our test it is somewhat average and the word so-so comes to mind. The Vault certainly gets the job done and is supportive underfoot, but it does not stand out in any one category as performing exceptionally. When we add in its price, it becomes less attractive as we feel there are lighter and better-performing pedals on the market.

Tara Reddinger-Adams

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