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OneUp Components Composite Review

A well-rounded and effective composite pedal at an unbelievable price point
OneUp Components Composite
Editors' Choice Award
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Price:  $49 List | Check Price at Competitive Cyclist
Compare prices at 2 resellers
Pros:  Excellent price point, well-rounded performance, service kits readily available
Cons:  Convex shape might be polarizing, not the grippiest
Manufacturer:   OneUp Components
By Pat Donahue ⋅ Senior Review Editor  ⋅  Jul 20, 2020
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80
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#4 of 14
  • Grip and Traction - 25% 8
  • Platform - 25% 8
  • Mobility - 20% 8
  • Servicing - 15% 8
  • Weight - 15% 8

Our Verdict

OneUp Components is a company that is known for producing rock-solid products at outstanding prices. We feel that OneUp knocked it out of the park with their Composite pedals. In fact, we liked them so much that they earned our Best Buy award for the dialed blend of grip/traction and weight paired with an outstanding price tag. They aren't the thinnest or the absolute grippiest pedals on the market, but they do provide plenty of grip in all conditions, are easily serviced with readily available parts, and offer predictable mobility. It is the combination of an eye-popping price and solid performance that really helps the OneUp Composite stand out.

Compare to Similar Products

 
Awards Editors' Choice Award Editors' Choice Award Top Pick Award Top Pick Award  
Price $49 List$125.00 at Amazon
Compare at 2 sellers
$150.98 at Amazon
Compare at 2 sellers
$169 List$75 List
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Pros Excellent price point, well-rounded performance, service kits readily availableTremendous amount of grip, reasonable price tag, easy to service, versatile, large platformUnshakeable grip, huge platform, lightweight, hidden grease port, angled traction pins, double concaveMaximum grip, large concave platform, built with high quality parts, versatileHigh grip, strong build, reasonable price
Cons Convex shape might be polarizing, not the grippiestLimited foot mobility, almost too much gripVery expensive, not very versatile, difficult compatibility with some cranksExpensive, sometimes too grippy, thick profile, top loading pins, heavier weightHard to relocate foot mid-decent, heavy if you do a lot of pedaling, not ideal for dirt jumping
Bottom Line A quality composite pedal at an outstanding price pointThese pedals offer unrivaled performance paired with a spectacular price tagAwesome combo of lightweight and large platform, enduro lovers will dig this grippy modelIf you're searching for maximum grip, look no furtherAll-star pedal with a durable machined finish, offering exceptional grip and performance on your downhill rig
Rating Categories OneUp Components Composite OneUp Components Aluminum Race Face Atlas Deity Components TMAC Nukeproof Horizon Pro
Grip And Traction (25%)
8
10
9
10
9
Platform (25%)
8
9
9
9
8
Mobility (20%)
8
9
8
8
8
Servicing (15%)
8
8
7
9
7
Weight (15%)
8
8
9
5
6
Specs OneUp Components... OneUp Components... Race Face Atlas Deity Components... Nukeproof Horizon...
Measured Weight per pair (g) 359 g 370 g 347 g 437 g 426 g
Traction Pins (per side) 10, 2.5 mm hex head bottom loading 10, 3 mm hex head bottom loading 10, 3 mm hex head- bottom loading 14, 2 mm hex head top loading 10, 2 mm hex head bottom loading with 1 mm washers per pin
Platform Dimensions (mm) 114 mm x 104 mm 114 mm x 104 mm 114 mm x 101 mm 110 mm x 105 mm 100 mm x 105 mm
Platform Profile (mm) - not including pins 13.8 mm leading and trailing edges, 16.9 mm at axle 8.8 mm leading and trailing edges, 12.1 mm at axle 14.5mm, 12mm double concave 19 mm leading and trailing edges, 14 mm at axle 18 mm leading and trailing edges, 16 mm at axle
Concavity slight convexity slight convexity 2.5 mm difference from effective edges to tapered end of spindle 5 mm difference from effective edges to center axle. Super concave 2.5mm pedal profile per side. 2 mm difference from effective edges to middle of axle
Q Factor / Distance from cranks to furthest pin 106 mm 107.6 mm 111 mm 113 mm 110 mm
Bearings DU cartridge 4 double-sealed cartridge bearings 4 full sealed cartridge bearings per pedal Multi micro sealed bearings and Deity DU bushing internals 4 per pair
Body Material Nylon Composite Forged 6061-T6 aluminum 6061-T6 aluminum Forged 6061-T6 aluminum Forged 6061-T6 Alloy body with CNC finishing
Pedal Wrench Type 15 mm pedal spanner, 6 mm hex 8 mm hex 8mm hex 15 mm pedal spanner, 8 mm hex 15 mm pedal spanner, 8 mm hex

Our Analysis and Test Results

The OneUp Composite pedals are one of those products that posted a solid score in all performance metrics. They never quite blew our collective minds in any single area. However, when you mix in the stunning price point, these pedals are a no-brainer for the budget-focused rider or those who prefer a composite pedal to a metal one. As a result, the OneUp Composite pedals earned our Editor's Choice Award as the best overall composite pedal we tested.

Performance Comparison



The OneUp Composite Pedal in all of its glory. This pedal delivers...
The OneUp Composite Pedal in all of its glory. This pedal delivers great performance at an even better price.

Grip/Traction


The Composite pedals offer above-average levels of grip/traction. Two different testers rode these pedals. One tester with Specialized 2FO flat shoes that use SlipNot rubber was slightly more impressed than the tester with Bontrager Flatline shoes. Still, both testers agreed the OneUp pedals clung to their soles better than most.

Ten bottom-loading pins per side are distributed across the platform and protrude 4.6mm. The placement is good with 4 pins at the front, 3 pins at the back, and 3 more pins along the axle. The pins are well-placed and the outboard ones offer a good feel when bouncing through a rock garden or dipping into a nasty corner while the center pins help to keep your for from slipping on the axle. OneUp also machine some shallow textured grooves into the body of the pedal in the open space between the perimeter and axle pins. When things got super chundery, the grip was fine, but some of the top performers in this metric were noticeably more grippy. When you are paying attention and really dropping your heels into a nasty downhill, the grip is solid and reliable.

Our main concern was on flatter, bumpy sections and techy climbs where riders may be apt to pay less attention. We slipped some pedals quite easily working up awkward sections of trail and cranking over some flat stuff littered with roots and rocks. If you are really focused, it shouldn't be an issue. That said, two hours into a long ride, we found these pedals required a little more attention than the grippiest competitors.

This is far from the thinnest platform in our review, but it is...
This is far from the thinnest platform in our review, but it is respectable and features a convex shape.

Platform


The OneUp Composite pedals have a 114mm x 104mm platform. This puts them in the larger end of the platform size spectrum, especially in terms of their length. The leading edge of the platform is 13.8 mm thick while the platform is 16.8mm thick at the axle, giving them a very slight 3mm convex shape. The distance from the crank arm to the furthest outboard pin is 106mm.

The platform is relatively large and nearly symmetrical, without being excessively wide. Testers felt they were always able to get their foot into a good position. Whether it was a quick dab on an awkward climb or dropping a foot to drift a corner, it's easy to find a good spot on the platform. The convex shape of the pedal is a matter of personal preference. Our tester with the Specialized 2FO shoes noticed this shape more than the tester with the Bontrager Flatline shoes with a very stiff sole.

The pedal platform is slightly thicker at the axle and thinner at...
The pedal platform is slightly thicker at the axle and thinner at the leading and trailing edges.

The elephant in the room is that the OneUp Composite Pedals are on the thicker side of the spectrum. At 16.8mm at the axle, the platform is chunkier than the thinnest competitors, but with 13.8mm leading edges, they are still much slimmer than some. The leading edges are also slightly angled to help reduce the platform's profile. It will depend on the terrain you ride and your riding style, but we didn't experience excessive pedal strikes while testing. It is also worth mentioning that these pedals are thinner than the other composite models we tested.

The composite material, or plastic, reacts well to pedal strikes. While an aluminum pedal has a grinding feel, the plastic feels a little more slippery and tends to glance off rocks a little more easily than aluminum. This could be the difference between a crash and a near miss.

The bearing is located in this end of the pedal body. The pedals are...
The bearing is located in this end of the pedal body. The pedals are also labeled left and right. This is a nice touch that can't be overlooked.

Mobility


Foot mobility was predictable and surprisingly easy with the OneUp Composite pedals. While we may not have found these to be the grippiest pedals on the planet, it was easy to reposition the foot heading into a rock garden or corner. This is quite important as nobody wants to roll into the gnar with their foot in a less-than-ideal position.

The pin pattern is relatively open in the center of the pedal with 3 pins along the axle. While there isn't exactly a lot of dead space in the center of the pedal, we found that it was relatively easy to shift your foot position on the fly. All it takes is a small unweighting of the pedal and a quick bounce to adjust the angle or the fore/aft position of the foot. Riders with shoes with tackier compounds may have a harder time moving the foot, but both testers were impressed with the ease of mobility with these pedals.

These pedals had appropriate levels of mobility on the axle. They didn't drag too hard when you are trying to kick them into the right position. They also didn't spin so freely that we were concerned about having the pedal poorly oriented when we were forced to pull our foot off the pedal and then get it back on in a hurry. We felt confident replacing our feet on these pedals since they tended to stay in the position we left them instead of just spinning freely.

Removing the outer retaining bolt (black) and inner bolt (silver)...
Removing the outer retaining bolt (black) and inner bolt (silver) exposes a retaining nut.

Servicing/Build


The Composite pedals posted a decent score in terms of serviceability. The process is straightforward but requires some tools that you may not have. That said, OneUp makes replacement parts easily available. The bearing rebuild kit and pin kits are both quite affordable and should ensure these pedals can crank their way through multiple seasons. Our test pedals did not come with replacement pins.

To service the axle, you need to remove the black plastic outer end cap on the outboard side of the pedal. After removing the plastic outer cap with an allen wrench, a silver bolt is exposed. This can be removed with an allen as well. Here comes the tricky part. You need a long (1-2 cm) socket to reach the nut that releases the axle and allows you to pull it out. Not everyone will have this socket at home. Once the axle is out, it is clear sailing to clean and regrease the bearing and axle. The Composite pedal bearing rebuild kit will set you back $16.50. A pedal pin kit is also available for $15 and it includes 20 replacement pins, hex nuts, and end caps.

Use a socket to remove the retaining nut and the axle pulls out.
Use a socket to remove the retaining nut and the axle pulls out.

Weight


At 359-grams per set, the Composite pedals are on the lighter end of the spectrum. In fact, they are approximately 15-grams heavier than the lightest options in this review.

Weight can be noticeable while turning the cranks for hours. Some folks will have concerns that a low weight can detract from durability and longevity. We don't feel there is any reason to worry about the lifespan of these pedals and they should be ready for multiple seasons of abuse.

Value


These pedals offer a tremendous value. The impressive, low price point paired with rock-solid on-trail performance is a recipe for a winner. The pedals ride well and don't break the bank. In addition, replacement parts and service kits are readily available.

The only downside to a consumer-direct brand, like OneUp Components, is riders will need to address any warranty issues directly with the brand. These are not the pedals you will be able to drop off at the bike shop for them to handle the warranty process.

Light, inexpensive, and rock-solid on the trail...whats not to like.
Light, inexpensive, and rock-solid on the trail...whats not to like.

Conclusion


The OneUp Components Composite earned our Editor's Choice award for the fantastic blend of reliable and rock-solid performance at an incredible price point. Although they didn't blow us away in any single performance metric, they work very well on the trail. It is very hard to go wrong with this blend of performance and price, and we feel these are the best composite pedals we've tested.

Pat Donahue