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Topeak JoeBlow Sport 2Stage Review

The fastest pump for high volume mountain bike tires that we tested
Topeak JoeBlow Sport 2Stage
Photo: Topeak
Top Pick Award
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Price:  $120 List | Check Price at REI
Compare prices at 3 resellers
Pros:  Efficient at high volumes, settings for road and MTB tires, double-sided nozzle
Cons:  More expensive, inaccurate above 30 PSI, tall for shorter users, no bleeder valve
Manufacturer:   Topeak
By Clark Tate ⋅ Senior Review Editor  ⋅  Oct 8, 2021
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62
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#6 of 11
  • Ease of Attachment - 25% 6
  • Inflation - 25% 9
  • Stability - 20% 7
  • Accuracy - 15% 2
  • Gauge - 15% 5

Our Verdict

The Topeak JoeBlow Sport 2Stage has a lot going for it. Its double-headed nozzle makes it easy to switch between Schrader, Dunlap, and Presta valves. The pump offers two inflation settings at the flick of a switch as well. One is optimized for high-volume mountain bike tires and another for high-pressure road rubber. The result is crazy pumping efficiency, particularly with fat tires. It's accurate at lower pressures (30 PSI and below), but, unfortunately, it isn't as precise at higher ones. If you're not worried about exact pressures but like to get your mountain and road tires full fast, this is a great option.

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Awards Top Pick Award Editors' Choice Award Best Buy Award Best Buy Award  
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$120 List$45.00 at REI$69.99 at Amazon
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$54.99 at Backcountry
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Pros Efficient at high volumes, settings for road and MTB tires, double-sided nozzleNozzle works with Presta and Schrader valves, accurate, well-placed pressure relief valveInexpensive, stable, comfortable, auto select nozzle for Presta and Schrader valvesWorks great with high volume tires, stable, universal nozzle works with Presta and SchraderRelatively affordable, accurate, secure connection, valve core tool and pressure relief valve
Cons More expensive, inaccurate above 30 PSI, tall for shorter users, no bleeder valveExpensive, heavy, tippy in one direction, not great for high-volume tiresNozzle can be tricky to use, no ball or bladder adaptersNot so great with high-pressure tires, gauge is harder to read than someNot meant for high volume tires, not the most precise or easiest gauge to read
Bottom Line The fastest pump for high volume mountain bike tires that we testedWith a bleeder valve in its handle and a nozzle that works with Schrader and Presta valves, this pump does its job wellA comfortable pump with an auto selecting nozzle and low price tagThis high-value pump works exceptionally well with high volume tires and features a universal nozzleA thoughtfully constructed, accurate pump that’s great for high pressure tires up to 220 PSI
Rating Categories Topeak JoeBlow Spor... Specialized Air Too... Bontrager Charger Crankbrothers Sterling Lezyne Sport Drive
Ease Of Attachment (25%)
6.0
9.0
5.0
8.0
7.0
Inflation (25%)
9.0
7.0
7.0
5.0
5.0
Stability (20%)
7.0
6.0
9.0
8.0
8.0
Accuracy (15%)
2.0
8.0
7.0
7.0
8.0
Gauge (15%)
5.0
8.0
7.0
5.0
5.0
Specs Topeak JoeBlow Spor... Specialized Air Too... Bontrager Charger Crankbrothers Sterling Lezyne Sport Drive
Max PSI 160 140 160 160 220
High Volume or High Pressure Both Both Both Both High Pressure
Weight 4.8 lbs 4.9 lbs 3.1 lbs 2.7 lbs 3.3 lbs
Height 29.75 in 25 in 27 in 25 in 30 in
Hose Length 32 in 45.5 in 38 in 36 in 50 in
Tubeless Recommended? No No No No No
Accessory Inflators Included? Yes No No Yes Yes

Our Analysis and Test Results

If you want to switch between high-volume and high-pressure quickly and you want to be able to do it fast, the JoeBlow Sport 2Stage is a great choice. Just keep in mind that this pump is tall, so shorter users may struggle to use the full volume of the pump consistently.

Performance Comparison


The Sport 2Stage lets you choose between using two cylinders for...
The Sport 2Stage lets you choose between using two cylinders for high-volume tires or switching to one to reach high pressures.
Photo: Clark Tate

Ease of Attachment


Attaching this pump's lock-on chuck is straightforward. Press it down inline with the tire's valve until the valve is covered. Once it's in place, slide the locking handle on the nozzle away from the tire and hammer away. The lock is large and rotates easily, which we can't say for all the pumps in our lineup. It makes a bigger difference than you'd think. All told, we never struggled to get this pump's nozzle in place or keep it attached.


The chuck is compatible with Presta, Dunlop, and Schrader valves, and the double-sided nozzle makes it incredibly easy to switch back and forth; just use one side or the other. The quick flip keeps it at the ready. One side, marked with a P, works with Presta and Dunlop valves; the other is marked with an S for Schrader.

The double-head chuck of the 2Stage accepts Schrader valves (using...
The double-head chuck of the 2Stage accepts Schrader valves (using the black side on the right) and Dunlap and Presta valves (gray side on the left).
Photo: Clark Tate

The hose seems high-quality and is pliable, making it easy to move around. It's mounted on a swivel on the right side of the gauge. It does, sort of, rotate a full 360 degrees as advertised, but it struggles to fit around the gauge. That makes it hard to pull the hose straight out in front of the pump. That said, we never ran into a situation where we needed it to be longer or more mobile than it is.

The hose on the Sport 2Stage is flexible and mostly well-conceived...
The hose on the Sport 2Stage is flexible and mostly well-conceived. It provides a holder for the needle and cone adapters as well.
Photo: Clark Tate

Inflation


The unique aspect of this pump is that you can set it up to accommodate either high-volume tires for mountain biking or high-pressure tires for the road. Its default is Stage 1 for high volume, and that's where it shines. This setting leaves the dial at the top of the pump in its natural position, in line with the shaft. Stage 1 opens both of the pump's barrels to access 715 ccs (cubic centimeters) of air volume, helping you reach 30 PSI (pounds per square inch) with "30% less effort," according to Topeak.


In our test, it took eight pumps for the 2Stage to inflate a 26" downhill tire from 10 to 30 PSI. The other pumps needed 16 to 30. That's a 100 to 375% increase. If you want to fill up a bunch of fat tires, it's hard to argue with that efficiency. But, it does become harder to press down every pump, so you're still working hard.

Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge

The 2Stage didn't do quite as well in our road bike tire inflation test. We switched it to Stage 2 by flipping the switch, setting the pump up to use only one barrel with 258 ccs, and making it easier to compress if you need to crank up the pressure. It took 11 compressions to take our tire from 40 to 80 PSI, according to the gauge. That's higher than the eight odd pumps the best high-pressure pumps needed, but not too shabby.

Keep in mind, though, as we discuss below, the pump's gauge isn't very accurate at higher pressures, so you'll be doing more pumping with road tires if you want to hit your target.

The large, flat handle is comfortable in hand.
The large, flat handle is comfortable in hand.
Photo: Clark Tate

We like the feel of this pump and appreciate the wide, flat, and comfortable handle. Since it's not contoured, it works well no matter your hand size, and the rubber has a nice feel. The base plate doesn't angle towards the body very far, so standing on it with both feet pulls you uncomfortably close to the pump, particularly given its height (29.75 inches). In fact, it's so tall when extended (49 inches) that our 5'5" tester had trouble getting weight over the handle to get a full compression. This wasn't a problem for our 6'2" tester.

With this pump, you get needle and cone adapters, and a secure holder for both is clamped onto the hose. However, there isn't an air bleeding system to precisely lower the pressure if you accidentally overinflate your tires.

Stability


The 2Stage is balanced enough to stand solidly on its own and even to deal with a few knocks. A fairly heavy steel construction keeps its center of gravity low, which helps keep it upright. However, though the base is wide laterally, it doesn't have as much front-to-back stability. There are two points that jut out in front to give it some tip-resistance, but it sways more readily than we'd like.


Again, the base plate doesn't set you up for the best pumping position. If you have both feet on the base, it's uncomfortable, pulling you too close to the handle to have much leverage. The shorter you are, the worse it feels. With one foot on and the other off, it's fine but far from our favorite.

The 2Stage is in the middle of the road weight-wise.
The 2Stage is in the middle of the road weight-wise.
Photo: Clark Tate

Two crimps at the top of the shaft hold the hose in place and keep the chuck from banging around the pump too alarmingly. One clip is on the same side of the pump as the hose attachment point. The other is centered on the shaft. The hose is short enough that only about 5 inches of the hose and nozzle are left loose, minimizing wear and tear on the chuck. The hose is also short enough that you can clip the nozzle in close to minimize movement without leaving too much slack in the hose.

This pump isn't the most stable in the test. It has a lot of support...
This pump isn't the most stable in the test. It has a lot of support side to side but not so much front to back.
Photo: Clark Tate

Accuracy


Accuracy is the biggest weak point for the 2Stage. Again, it's fine at pressures at or below 30 PSI, but this gauge goes up to 160 PSI. That leaves a range of 130 where it doesn't do so well. We're pretty tempted to blame the gauge, but we'll get into that below. First, we'll summarize the results of our accuracy tests.


When we double-checked our tire pressures after pumping a mountain bike tire up to 30 PSI, our independent gauge said they were 1 to 3 PSI below. We got more accurate the more we tried. We can live with that.

The pump is less accurate when used with high pressure road tires.
The pump is less accurate when used with high pressure road tires.
Photo: Clark Tate

When verifying our 40 PSI pressure tests on a road bike tire, the tires were 4 to 5 PSI under-inflated. Not great, but we learned to adjust. By the time we got to 80 PSI, we were off by 5 to 10 PSI. The tires always held less air than the 2Stage led us to believe. That is irksome. Check out the gauge section below for more information.

The 2Stage's gauge is unique with tick marks for every 1 PSI in the...
The 2Stage's gauge is unique with tick marks for every 1 PSI in the first (yellow) half, and every 5 PSI in the second (white) one.
Photo: Clark Tate

Gauge


The gauge on the 2Stage is set about 9 inches off the floor, which holds it closer to your eyes without being so high that it throws the pump's balance off. It reads pressure in both PSI and Bar and displays the PSI numbers on the edge of the gauge itself. That keeps them clear of the glare of the glass and makes them very easy to see. The gauge's face itself is about 3 inches across.


The gauge is color-coded as well. The readings up to 30 PSI are yellow, take up half the screen, and mark every single PSI to help you dial in small changes. The rest of the gauge is labeled in white, with numbers labeled in 20 PSI increments from 30 to 160 PSI. Each tick mark on this side marks 5 PSI, and they are very close together.

We like that the PSI numbers are printed on the edge of the gauge...
We like that the PSI numbers are printed on the edge of the gauge and aren't susceptible to glare from the glass like the Bar readings are.
Photo: Clark Tate

The detail on the first half of the gauge is cool but not that useful. No one really needs to know if they have 5 PSI in a tire, but you'll sometimes want to hit pressures around 31 or 32, and this gauge makes that hard. The resolution drops starkly after 30 PSI, making it hard to tell if you're pointing to 40, 42, or 45. We think this may be why our higher pressure readings were less accurate, but it probably doesn't explain it all.

The gauge is easy to see. It's just not always easy to read.
The gauge is easy to see. It's just not always easy to read.
Photo: Clark Tate

The convenient sliding marker does help you keep track of the pressure you want to hit, but it doesn't compensate for the lack of precision in the second half of the gauge.

Value


This is by far the most efficient pump we tested when it comes to inflating high-volume tires. It's a rare specialist. If that's important to you, that alone could make it worth its relatively high price tag. To be able to move that much air and then switch to filling a high-pressure tire is impressive. Other options offer the same volume to pressure switch, but none fill those tires so quickly. You can't buy your time back, and this pump will definitely save you some.

Topeak has a reputation for fairly durable products, and this pump seems to meet those expectations. The steel base and shaft seem sturdy, and the flexible hose and hardy plastic nozzle seem equally poised to last.

The nozzle is well made, with a large, comfortable locking lever.
The nozzle is well made, with a large, comfortable locking lever.
Photo: Clark Tate

Conclusion


This big and burly pump smokes the competition when it comes to filling a fat tire but struggles to get a good read on road rubber. If you mostly ride on trails but crank out road rides from time to time and don't mind being patient while you dial in your numbers, the Topeak JoeBlow Sport 2Stage may be the right mix for you.

The shorter hose helps you secure the nozzle for storage.
The shorter hose helps you secure the nozzle for storage.
Photo: Clark Tate

Clark Tate