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Best Travel Backpack of 2020

Thursday October 1, 2020
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Over the last 7 years, we have put 32 unique travel backpacks to the test with the best 11 in this 2020 review. Whether we are city bike commuting or cross-continent adventuring, we never leave without a bag! So it's safe to say that we know a thing or two about what makes for a well-balanced pack. To test capacity and organization, we have a standardized pack list to see how well each accommodates the essentials. We've made sure to rough these bags up by shoving them into tiny airplanes, grimy buses, and in the back of gear laden SUVs. Armed with that knowledge and consumer reviews online, we are able to accurately weigh in on durability as well. We've done the research for you, so check out our findings to see which pack best suits your needs!

Top 11 Product Ratings

Displaying 6 - 10 of 11

Best Overall Travel Backpack


Peak Design Travel 45


Editors' Choice Award

$175.95
(41% off)
at Amazon
See It

86
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort - 25% 9
  • Features - 25% 9
  • Packing & Accessibility - 20% 9
  • Durability - 15% 9
  • Volume to Weight Ratio - 15% 6
Measured Weight: 4.51 lbs | Volume of Main Pack: 45L
Comfortable
Syncs with accessories (sold separately)
Innovative yet simple design
Sturdy
Carry on size compliant
Weight per volume is not optimal
Expensive

The Peak Design Travel Backpack is a well thought out simple design chock-full of usable features. From its detachable lash straps to its magnetic tuckaway harness system, this bag is an innovative marvel. The high-density foam in the hip belt and shoulder straps make it so comfortable you barely realize you're wearing a pack, no matter how heavy you stuff it. Everything on this bag is highly customizable. The shoulder straps and hip belt are on a swivel and lock away neatly behind a magnetic flap to ensure that there is nothing unnecessarily hanging off the bag when not in use. The zippers and compression buttons help to minimize its volume for shorter trips, although it fit just fine under the airplane seat fully expanded. Peak Design also makes accessories for camera gear, which sync flawlessly with the bag.

While this bag is feature-rich and comfortable, we wouldn't be doing our jobs correctly if we didn't take the time to find something on the bag to improve upon. We found that it lacked a little in the stuff-factor. The bag itself is a little heavy for the size, and due to its rigid structure, we were only able to fit so much inside. If you are looking for a single pack to carry anything and everything you might need for a long trip, you may want to search elsewhere. This bag is also wildly expensive. However, for the right user, it is well worth it. This bag made us incredibly happy everywhere we took it and thus earned our top accolades.

Read review: Peak Design Travel 45

Best Bang for the Buck


Osprey Porter 46


Best Buy Award

$79.99
(43% off)
at Amazon
See It

81
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort - 25% 8
  • Features - 25% 7
  • Packing & Accessibility - 20% 9
  • Durability - 15% 9
  • Volume to Weight Ratio - 15% 8
Measured Weight: 3.23 lbs | Volume of Main Pack: 46L
Carry-on size compliant
Outdoor chic
Lightweight
Less expensive than other packs
Fits an impressive amount of gear
Bulky
No water bottle pocket
Lack of easy access pockets

The Osprey Porter 46 stole the show with its approachable price tag and its unique straightjacket compression straps. We could pack the main compartment to the brim and still compress it enough to use as a standard carry on. The straightjacket covers all but one zipper on the exposed side of the bag. This makes it very secure, so pickpockets will have a hard time sneaking into it while it's on your back. It has a very supportive laptop sleeve, strategically placed on the back panel for added security. This pack would do wonders for someone traveling internationally with gear and a lot of clothing.

While the harness system tucks away easily and neatly, it is an all or nothing system. Because the shoulder straps clip into the hip belt, you must deploy the hip belt to have functioning shoulder straps. This makes sense most of the time, but because this is a slightly larger travel backpack, we would prefer to be able to deploy one without the other. The compression system is effective but can feel very bulky if the bag is not full. While it provides some security, it also makes getting into any of the inner pockets unnecessarily involved. But all in all, this is a very useful bag that's both good-looking and affordable.

Read review: Osprey Porter 46

Best for the Overpacker


Patagonia Black Hole MLC


Top Pick Award

$199.00
at REI
See It

80
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort - 25% 6
  • Features - 25% 9
  • Packing & Accessibility - 20% 9
  • Durability - 15% 9
  • Volume to Weight Ratio - 15% 7
Weight: 3.35 lbs | Volume of Main Pack: 45L
Highly durable
Versatile
Easy to use
Balanced travel features
Not suited for long-distance carries
A tendency for gear to sag
No water bottle pocket
No back support

Patagonia is known for its durable material, and their reputation precedes them with the Black Hole MLC. The fabric comes from their extremely durable line of expedition duffel bags — with which we are intimately familiar and infinitely impressed. Not only is this pack durable, but it is well organized and has enough features to be useful for a variety of travel adventures. The characteristic we are most impressed with was its stuffability. Its soft body and clamshell style allow for ultimate stuffing potential, and the mesh dividers allow for full visibility into each compartment when the bag is open.

If we had to pick a gripe about this pack, we would note that the shoulder straps are not the most comfortable for a particularly heavy load or long-distance travel. Due to its lack of structure, the bag has the propensity to feel bulky if not loaded intentionally. We found that this was a non-issue as long as you put your softer clothing on the strapped side of the bag to avoid anything protruding while using it as a backpack. Otherwise, there is little to complain about in regards to the MLC and its excellent construction.

Read review: Patagonia Black Hole MLC

Best for Traveling with Gear


REI Co-op Ruckpack 40


Top Pick Award

$54.93
(61% off)
at REI
See It

78
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort - 25% 9
  • Features - 25% 8
  • Packing & Accessibility - 20% 8
  • Durability - 15% 8
  • Volume to Weight Ratio - 15% 5
Weight: 4.32 lbs | Volume of Main Pack: 40L
Intuitive
Tapered shape for easy loading
Comfortable yet breathable back panel
Harness flap difficult to deploy
Shallow water bottle pockets

If you find yourself traveling with heavy outdoor gear often, the tapered shape of the REI Ruckpack may be just what you're looking for. The top to bottom zippers allow for easy access and strategic packing while the tapered shape encourages all heavy gear to stay down at the base. It helps keep the pack from getting top-heavy, which can create an uneven distribution of weight and cause discomfort or lack of balance for the user. We found this was the perfect airplane-to-crag bag for those trips when you are pressed for time or space. The comfortable harness system is completely stowable for long car trips or when checking your bag, and the easily accessible and organized side pockets are great for your travel essentials.

While we appreciate the side pocket organization, we did find that some of the smaller pockets inside the bag are a little too shallow to feasibly hold anything. The shallow pocket theme extends to the two water bottle pockets on the sides. Most bottle sizes will fit but are not particularly secure when the bag isn't upright. We also found that the harder hip pads take a moment to get used to, so don't be surprised if you feel a little discomfort when you first put the pack on. The discomfort only lasted a few uses, and then we found the pack to be very comfortable and extremely supportive.

Read review: REI Ruckpack 40

Best for Light and Easy Travel


Cotopaxi Allpa 35L


Top Pick Award

$186.99
(7% off)
at Amazon
See It

76
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort - 25% 8
  • Features - 25% 7
  • Packing & Accessibility - 20% 8
  • Durability - 15% 9
  • Volume to Weight Ratio - 15% 6
Weight: 3.6 lbs | Volume of Main Pack: 35L
Comfortable when fully packed
Hip belt deploys separately from shoulder straps
Fun look
Thoughtful accessories available for purchase
Floppy when not filled
Organization less intuitive
No back support

The Cotopaxi Allpa materials are super durable, which is great for longevity and ensures the bag looks good through many adventures. This durability is important because strict practicality aside, what we enjoyed most about this bag were the fun colors and stylish look. We also love the thoughtful extras like a rain fly (included) and the company's offered bundles (for an upgraded price), which includes items like a water bottle and day pack. Cotopaxi ensures that its consumers feel well cared for when using their products and passes that feeling on in its contributions to organizations trying to improve the global human condition. This backpack has a casual, fun look to it, and enough features to safely pack your electronics.

While we appreciate the simple organization scheme of the Allpa, at times, it didn't feel fully intuitive. It makes an excellent pack for the travel generalist, but does not have a clear 'identity.' At times, we struggled to know where to put our wallet and passport, essential items to have safe yet accessible during travel. Our last complaint is that the solution Cotopaxi came up with to deter pickpocketing while traveling, while simple, mostly just deterred us from ever fully closing the zippers unless we were not planning on getting into the bag any time soon. Overall, this didn't amount to much negativity, and we love using the bag for a variety of purposes and think you will too!

Read review: Cotopaxi Allpa

Best Weight to Volume


Osprey Fairview 55


Top Pick Award

$116.95
(35% off)
at Amazon
See It

75
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort - 25% 7
  • Features - 25% 7
  • Packing & Accessibility - 20% 7
  • Durability - 15% 8
  • Volume to Weight Ratio - 15% 9
Weight: 3.10 lbs | Volume of Main Pack: 55L
Lightweight
Large capacity
Two bags in one
Well made
A bit bulky
Water bottle pockets aren't great

The Osprey Fairview is highly versatile and offers the best weight-to-volume ratio in our review. Two bags nest together as one when you're on the go and offer a generous 55-liter capacity while weighing barely over three pounds. Once you get to your destination, just zip off the handy daypack and leave what you don't need behind! The organization is straightforward and simple. Compression straps help reign in some of the bulk, though you may have trouble carrying this bad boy onboard unless you separate it as your carry-on and personal item — when the bags are combined, the Fairview is relatively large. But for versatility, durability, and decent comfort, this is a bag we quite enjoyed traveling with.

Taller folks should keep in mind the hip belt on the Fairview sits rather high, and the way the bag distributes weight on the back is a bit odd — though if you take some time to fuss and finagle, we're confident you can dial it in for your frame. We also wish there were a few more small pockets, especially secure ones for items like cash and a passport. And while we appreciate compression straps as much as the next traveler, they can get a bit unwieldy. There are certainly some areas for improvement on this pack, but overall we love the convertibility, and we appreciate the excellent volume-to-weight ratio.

Read review: Osprey Fairview 55


Why You Should Trust Us


This article is brought to you by Hayley Thomas and Lyra Pierotti. Hayley resides in Colorado and lives for nature and travel. Her favorite place to travel is anywhere with rock climbing, but you can also find her on the slopes in the winter and taking long bike rides in the summer — almost always with a backpack in tow. Lyra spends an alarming amount of the year organizing her life and living out of duffel bags and backpacks. If you can find her at home, you can catch her coaching climbers, running trails in minimalist shoes, and guiding various peaks in her beloved home range, the North Cascades of Washington.

We've taken these packs on all sorts of adventures over the years. Our testers have traveled with them from "the Ice" of Antarctica to Moscow's cobblestone streets, and many places in between. In addition to visiting far off lands, we've been able to test them for day-to-day use around town and on our work commutes. This review encompasses a large selection of backpacks that you might use for a wide variety of travels.

Related: How We Tested Travel Backpacks

Testing travel backpacks is good fun  even if you're just traveling around your home hood.
Testing travel backpacks took us to some breathtaking places. What a planet we live on  eh?
Travel bags aren't just for airplanes. In truth  we travel every day  even if that just means going to the store and back. And having the right bag as a companion can make all the difference.

Analysis and Test Results


Since we couldn't possibly test every product ever made, even though we'd love to, we spend ample time on the front end researching the industry's top-rated options. After countless hours we eventually narrowed our search and settled on a selection that we believe to be the best of the best. Once we got our hands on the selection, we were sure to put each pack through rigorous testing under a very critical eye. We walked and biked with these packs on our backs or over our shoulders, and took them with us to numerous international destinations. They accompanied us in airplanes of all sizes and while racing through airports, crashing at hostels, and hopping on taxis and ferries.

Related: Buying Advice for Travel Backpacks

Not only do we test our suite out in the field, but we also take them back to the "lab" to confirm the metrics we determined during our research phase. We measured and weighed each bag and inspected the design, manufacturing quality, and materials. Then, we topped off our testing by packing and unpacking our Test Load to better compare across models.

On the road with an assortment of travel backpacks...
On the road with an assortment of travel backpacks...

Value


We are always price conscious here at GearLab, even when recommending expensive products. We like to give you options for various budget levels. We understand that considering the overall value a product holds is an important part of the purchasing process. Our chosen travel packs have a huge range of prices. While there may be some correlation between price and performance as far as durability goes, we didn't find that the correlation was particularly strong. The biggest thing we noticed here was that durable, lightweight materials cost a little more than durable, heavyweight materials. No huge surprise there. That said, we liked some of the less expensive bags as much as the very costly ones, so we recommend paying closer attention to the specific functionality you are seeking versus the stand-alone price.

The "Straight Jacket" system on the Porter 46 helps compress the bag enough to use as a carry-on  even when it is packed to the gills.
The "Straight Jacket" system on the Porter 46 helps compress the bag enough to use as a carry-on, even when it is packed to the gills.

In our latest update, there is one major standout, the Osprey Porter 46. It fit a boatload of stuff while compressing down small enough to use as a carry-on, and all for a very affordable price. Just what we look for in a great budget pick!


Comfort


Have you ever been traveling through a foreign country with an extremely uncomfortable bag? There isn't anything worse than starting a trip with the realization that what you will remember most is how the backpack strap kept digging into your dang shoulder. A travel-specific backpack that comfortably fits when weighed down with all your belongings is a sure-fire way to improve happiness and decrease frustration. Anyone who's traveled knows that travel days can be the most tiring of the trip. Maybe you're on a shoestring budget and your travel day requires going from hostel to boat dock to bus station to the airport, or maybe you rented a charming Parisian apartment on the 7th floor, only to find that the elevator is either broken or doesn't exist. In either case, you'll be grateful that you took the time to buy a comfortable backpack.


The most comfortable contenders were the REI Ruckpack and the Peak Design Travel Pack. We found that packs with well-padded hip belts, a stiffer or framed back panel, and shapes that foster even load distribution were most comfortable for the long haul. We need padding to be plentiful but don't want to be sweating through the straps, so we also paid close attention to the breathability of the shoulder straps and the airflow behind the back. The Ruckpack has breathable mesh along the back and shoulder straps to help keep you cool, making it a great option for backpack trips and extended carries.

The breathable back panel and shoulder straps on the Ruckpack make for a very comfortable load.
The breathable back panel and shoulder straps on the Ruckpack make for a very comfortable load.

Perhaps most importantly, you should consider how a pack fits your body and how it will feel once it's packed and taken for a spin. Have a professional help you size it or teach you how to measure and fit one yourself.

Finally, keep in mind that comfort is even more paramount if you plan to take your pack on backcountry adventures in between urban excursions. Out of this particular test suite, we would most likely take the REI Ruckpack on shorter backpacking trips, but for multi-night outings into the wild, we would consider something with a heftier frame for more support. Alternatively, you could pair a backpacking backpack with a lightweight daypack for a super versatile combo that works around the globe. Backpacking models typically work better in the outdoors, so if you plan on embarking on spontaneous backcountry overnights, this combo could be your ideal setup.

We gladly took the Ruckpack 40 out hiking with us but you may want to consider a backpacking bag for a multiday adventure.
We gladly took the Ruckpack 40 out hiking with us but you may want to consider a backpacking bag for a multiday adventure.

If you want a more standard suitcase-style travel backpack, we found the Cotopaxi Allpa to be impressively comfortable for what is essentially a suitcase on your back. It features complete suspension and generous padding, making it one of the more comfortable models in this review. The Osprey Porter is another great option due to its stiffer suspension that carries weight brilliantly.

The excellent suspension on the Porter 46 makes it carry comfortably despite the boxy and bulky shape.
The excellent suspension on the Porter 46 makes it carry comfortably despite the boxy and bulky shape.

Features


The ideal travel backpack transitions seamlessly with you, facilitates a fun travel experience, and helps transportation go smoothly. Seems simple enough, right? But in reality, checking all these boxes can be quite complicated. The experience we had with each pack hinged on how well we matched our choice to our specific needs. In this category, we tried to lay out the best uses for each pack and what features best enabled certain travel types. You should read between the lines of the numerical ratings and award winners to find your perfect pack.


Many of the packs in this review have a way of stowing the harness system to check it in at the airport. At first, we had mixed feelings about the industry-wide enthusiasm for stowable suspension. After testing and thinking on it extensively, we developed this opinion: for carry-on packs like the Porter 46, we like a suspension or harness system that tucks away into the back panel, as this one does. It makes perfect sense and eliminates the need for a separate flap of material to cover the straps (which must also have a pocket for you to stow the flap when the straps are not in use).

We prefer a zippered panel for packs that are too large to be used as a carry-on. Zippered panel coverings are easier to deploy and faster. They make more sense for bags that get checked often. As on the Porter , the tucking method of stowing the suspension is harder and more time-consuming. It makes more sense on rarely checked packs. It's a handy feature for those times your flight is full, and the airline is insisting on checking your carry-on (which seems to be happening more and more these days). It's also nice if you're carrying your bag in a duffel style or as a briefcase, slung over the shoulder with an accessory shoulder strap. On the Patagonia MLC, the shoulder straps stow in a zippered compartment, and then you can unzip another pocket to slide the whole pack over the handle of a rolling duffel — now that's clever.

Stuffing the backpack straps away makes carrying the Patagonia MLC briefcase style much more comfortable.
Stuffing the backpack straps away makes carrying the Patagonia MLC briefcase style much more comfortable.

Ask yourself this: if you're using a backpack strictly as a carry-on, do you need the zippered flap to cover your suspension system completely?

A pack's features determine versatility, and there is a broad range within this small category of mid-size models. There is the Porter 46 which gobbles up all types of gear, but still manages to be comfortable and is easy to get through airport security. We like the wonky design of the Osprey Ozone Duplex 60, a creative take on the hubbed backpack idea. This bag reverses the Fairview's design, so the larger bag is more of a duffel that clips on to the smaller (but very comfortable with good suspension) day pack, kind of like a turtle shell on your back.

We love the idea of the removable daypack  however we think this Fairview has a few kinks which need to be worked out.
We love the idea of the removable daypack, however we think this Fairview has a few kinks which need to be worked out.

Maybe you are looking for something light, easy, and stylish like the Cotopaxi Allpa. The Patagonia MLC is an enticing product if you want a well-balanced and fully-featured travel backpack. Look no further than Peak Design if you are looking for something to carry your camera gear around with.

The water bottle pockets on the Peak Design can accommodate a 40oz Hydro Flask and the forward-facing zipper compartments are perfect for small on the go valuables or cash.
The water bottle pockets on the Peak Design can accommodate a 40oz Hydro Flask and the forward-facing zipper compartments are perfect for small on the go valuables or cash.

We assessed these bags for urban travel, but we also considered how well they work for bike commuting, backpacking, and carrying books and office supplies. Some of the packs only work as checked bags, some can fit as a carry-on, and some can be personal items. We looked at the whole package of features on each backpack, assessing them for how intuitive and easy to use they are, and how well balanced the models were for general travel use.

If you're looking for something streamlined and simple then try out the Allpa 35!
If you're looking for something streamlined and simple then try out the Allpa 35!

Related: Buying Advice for Travel Backpacks

Packing & Accessibility


Imagine that moment when you're standing at the bus stop on a dirt road in Costa Rica, and it starts to downpour. Not long after, you realize your rain jacket is packed at the very bottom of your pack underneath all your dirty underwear. And then you realize you can't get your jacket out without unloading all the undies into the rapidly growing puddles beside you.


Or maybe you're racing through the airport towards security, and right as you're reaching the front of the line, you realize that the 12oz bottle of shampoo at the bottom of your bag is critically over the 4oz limit and must be removed pronto to avoid extra scrutiny from overzealous TSA agents. Since we're often rushed and fall short of achieving genius status packing jobs, we decided to keep our eyes peeled for the easiest bags to pack and unpack. We paid special attention to details like water bottle pockets, easy access laptop sleeves, and designated spots for your phone, passport, keys, and wallets.

Related: How to Pack Luggage Like a Pro

Some panel-loading packs have panels that zip all the way down to expose the entire contents of the pack and grab that rain jacket in a hurry like the Osprey Porter. Others have more of a suitcase panel design, or clamshell design, like the Patagonia MLC, making it very easy to pack, unpack, find gear, etc. On some other packs, the zippers stop partway down the sides, allowing for ease of access with precision packing as backpackers appreciate in a traditional top-loading pack.

The Patagonia MLC keeps your luggage organized and visible with zippered mesh compartments and pockets.
The Patagonia MLC keeps your luggage organized and visible with zippered mesh compartments and pockets.

Additionally, we learned that bags with more structured walls, like the Porter 46 or the Arc'teryx Covert, are more accessible and easy to pack. Even the TSA agent searching our Porter 46 could re-pack our luggage easily and quickly, which we appreciated that one time we almost missed our flight…

This pocket on the Porter helps keep you organized during travel and is easily accessible on the go.
This pocket on the Porter helps keep you organized during travel and is easily accessible on the go.

Within this category, we also considered each bag's easy access pockets, compression features, and dividers. The foam StraightJacket compression padding system on the Porter 46 works wonders for minimizing the overall size of a fully packed bag. However, this made it difficult to reach into any pockets besides the one on top, as access was restricted by the strap. So we had to make sure that anything we needed to access quickly was in the top pocket. The Cotopaxi Allpa has an internal compression strap system that helps keep everything in place without adding extra bulk, an attribute we like very much.

Cotopaxi pays special attention to all the little details  the Allpa even comes with a durable rain fly.
Cotopaxi pays special attention to all the little details, the Allpa even comes with a durable rain fly.

We found that the divider in the Peak Design pack was one of our favorites. The divider splits the bag in half longways and consists of two mesh pockets that are both accessible and visible from anywhere in the bag. If you don't want to utilize the wonderful divider, you don't have to leave it flopping around in the main compartment — there is a small pocket to tuck it away, leaving the main compartment as one big bucket. This bag scores highly for a reason; Peak Design really did think of everything.

The rollup divider in the Peak Design pack tucked very nicely into its designated pocked.
The rollup divider in the Peak Design pack tucked very nicely into its designated pocked.

In regards to electronics, we found that laptop sleeves placed on the back panel are the easiest to access when removing items in the airport security line. The Porter, Allpa, and Peak Design packs all make removing electronics on the fly quick and simple without compromising security.

The REI Ruckpack is also a favorite of ours in this category. With the option to front or top-load and tons of useful organizational pockets, this pack is a pleasure to pack, unpack, and repack.

This sneaky zipper pocket is a great spot to hide your valuables.
This sneaky zipper pocket is a great spot to hide your valuables.

Durability


When you're investing in a pack, it's always good to know that it's going to last. This is especially true if you're prepping for a trip where you're going to be on the road for quite a while. We looked up the denier (or D) ratings for each of the bags in this review. The higher the denier rating, the denser the fibers, which translates to a stronger fabric. The only exception is when comparing denier ratings on different types of materials; for example, 420D nylon is significantly stronger than a polyester fabric with the same rating. The standout in this detail is the Cotopaxi Allpa with 1000-denier fabric on the outside. Wow.


Beyond fabric quality, design has a significant influence on durability. While testing these bags, there were a few questions we kept circling back to. Are there any unnecessarily strained areas of the pack? Do the zippers or seams look as though they are unevenly tensioned? Do the strap flaps or pockets protect the harness system when tucked away? In general, how does the bag hold up to regular use?

The Patagonia MLC is durable enough for camping and looks good for a long time in use.
The Patagonia MLC is durable enough for camping and looks good for a long time in use.

We considered zipper durability and angles where repeated use may cause wear and tear. The Arc'teryx Covert C/O has zippers that turn right angles, a prominent spot to watch for any strain. Regardless, the Arc'teryx bag has a robust zipper that glides smoothly no matter how much the bag gets overstuffed. The Osprey Transporter 40 is also quite impressive here. The 840D double-coated nylon TPU can withstand anything you throw at it, the features are burly, and the seams are reinforced. You won't have to worry about a busted bag halfway through your trip with this puppy.

The Transporter might not be designed for airport travel  but it certainly handles air time well! Here  we're chucking bags onto the roof of the TomCat en route to Meany Lodge  Washington.
The Transporter might not be designed for airport travel, but it certainly handles air time well! Here, we're chucking bags onto the roof of the TomCat en route to Meany Lodge, Washington.

Other impressive contenders in this category are the Patagonia MLC with its expedition-ready Black Hole material, the excellently-crafted Porter 46 with it's protective and useful external compression system, and the simple-yet-effective Minaal 2.0. There is little to fail on the Minaal, and what is there is durable and rugged. The Peak Design pack is also, no surprise, a winner in this metric. From the 400D weatherproof nylon to the 900D weatherproof bottom liner and robust zippers, this bag is built to last.

Weatherproof zippers hold their own against rain and snow.
Weatherproof zippers hold their own against rain and snow.

Finally, we packed each bag to the brim and took them out into the field. We toted these packs around for weekend camping trips, week-long road trips, and weeks-long international trips. We hopped from bus to taxi to subway, then hit the trails, beaches, and towns, all the while looking for any signs of abnormal wear and tear on our decidedly ordinary travel adventures.

The Black Hole fabric comes from their extremely durable line of expedition duffel bags.
The Black Hole fabric comes from their extremely durable line of expedition duffel bags.

Volume to Weight Ratio


Whether you're attempting to meet airline requirements or simply looking at the inevitability of lugging your stuff around, pack weight and capacity are important considerations. The travel packs we reviewed ranged significantly in weight and volume. It is because of this range that we didn't think it was fair to compare the weights of each without accounting for their volume. We devised a simple equation of dividing the volume of each bag by its weight and compared this number across all our tested models. A larger number tells us that a bag offers more capacity per ounce on your back. And, while that, of course, means you may end up carrying more stuff (i.e., weight) on your back, you'll at least know it isn't the structure of the bag weighing you down.


Analyzing this ratio gave a boost to some of the smaller models that lost points in other categories due to the inherent limits of smaller packs and helped to balance out our metrics a bit. A higher score in this category may correlate with a higher price point, as stronger, lighter materials are the Holy Grail of travel.


The top scorer in this department is the Fairview 55. The fact that it splits into two bags means that you can leave weight behind that you don't need when you're just heading out for a day trip. Not too far behind is the Transporter 40 — this is the lightest bag in our entire review. Another notable performance comes from the Eagle Creek Wayfinder, and the MLC is also a standout with its lightweight-yet-burly material and its extreme packability.

The star of the show is the removable day pack  which zips on and off with ease.
The star of the show is the removable day pack, which zips on and off with ease.

Conclusion


Finding the right travel backpack can be almost as tricky as finding your ideal travel companion. This would seem like a relatively narrow niche of backpack styles; however, we found there to be quite a lot of variety on a complex and nuanced spectrum. We found some backpacks that lean more toward urban use, some that function more like a deluxe duffel, and still others that want to be a briefcase. Depending on your specific set of uses, we hope this review has been helpful in matching you with the best travel backpack for your needs and helping you minimize any excess baggage.

The well thought out construction of this pack had us feeling giddy every time we had the pleasure of utilizing one of its flawlessly executed features.
The well thought out construction of this pack had us feeling giddy every time we had the pleasure of utilizing one of its flawlessly executed features.

Hayley Thomas & Lyra Pierotti