Reviews You Can Rely On

Best Ski Gloves of 2022

We test men's ski gloves and mittens from Gordini, Hestra, Black Diamond, Outdoor Research, and others to find the warmest and most dexterous options
Best Ski Gloves of 2022
The Hestra Army Leather GTX is one of our favorite all-around gloves for its above-average warmth and superb durability all while keeping respectable dexterity. While it barely missed an award, it's still a fantastic glove.
Credit: Ian Nicholson
Tuesday April 26, 2022
Our Editors independently research, test, and rate the best products. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Learn more

Seeking the best ski gloves for your snow adventures? We have tested 65+ pairs in the last 9 years. For this update, we pit 22 top mittens and gloves for skiing and snowboarding against each other. Our experts took these models on snow for rigorous examination. The trial grounds are the same places you will use your gloves—ski resorts, backcountry laps, cross-country, on snowmobiles, and ski mountaineering missions spanning across the US, Canada, and Europe. We also put them through controlled temperature and water-resistance tests. Hands-on experience with each pair informs our assessments, focusing on the areas of performance you care about most.

Lady shredders, check out our women's ski gloves review. From a new snowboard or pair of skis to goggles, helmets, and jackets, our extensive reviews of ski and snow sports gear can help take the guesswork out of your purchases.

Related: Best Ski Gloves for Women

Top 22 Product Ratings

Displaying 1 - 5 of 22
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Awards Editors' Choice Award Top Pick Award  Top Pick Award  
Price $199 List
$199.00 at REI
$215.37 at Backcountry
Compare at 2 sellers
$500 ListCheck Price at REI
Compare at 2 sellers
$125.96 at Backcountry
Compare at 3 sellers
Overall Score Sort Icon
82
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73
Star Rating
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Pros Warm, water resistant, durable, dexterous, lightweight and packableGreat warmth, excellent weather resistance, useful featuresExtremely warm, weather resistantExcellent dexterity and durability, fairly warm, water resistantSuper warm, extremely tough, great weather resistance, removable liners help them dry quicker, our go-to expedition glove
Cons Expensive, lacks some featuresBulky, limited dexterity, expensiveVery expensive, heavy, bulkyExpensive, lacks some nice featuresNot very dexterous, take time to break in, if in between sizes you should consider sizing up
Bottom Line With top-tier performance across the board, this glove is what we recommend to those seeking the best pairThese battery-heated gloves keep your hands warm on the coldest days and during the coldest activitiesFor the coldest conditions on earthA weather-resistant and warm glove that retains dexterity, ideal for ski touringFor really cold activities, where giving up some dexterity for some serious warmth is a must, these gloves are hard to beat
Rating Categories Arc'teryx Fission SV Outdoor Research Lu... Outdoor Research Ca... Arc'teryx Sabre Black Diamond Guide
Warmth (25%)
7.0
9.0
10.0
6.0
8.0
Dexterity (25%)
8.0
6.0
4.0
9.0
4.0
Water Resistance (25%)
10.0
8.0
9.0
8.0
8.0
Durability (15%)
8.0
7.0
7.0
9.0
9.0
Features (10%)
7.0
9.0
8.0
4.0
9.0
Specs Arc'teryx Fission SV Outdoor Research Lu... Outdoor Research Ca... Arc'teryx Sabre Black Diamond Guide
Double or Single Glove Single Single Single Single Double
Gaunlet or Cuff? Gauntlet Gauntlet Gauntlet Cuff Gauntlet
Palm Material Leather Goat leather Goat leather Leather Goat leather
Waterproof Material Gore-Tex Gore-Tex Gore-Tex insert Gore-tex Gore-Tex insert
Insulation Type 133g Primaloft Gold Eco and 200g Primaloft Silver Eco EnduraLoft synthetic fibers Back of hand: 200 g/m2 PrimaLoft HiLoft Silver
Palm: 133g/m2 EnduraLoft
Primaloft 170g PrimaLoft Gold and 100g boiled wool fleece lining
Nose Wipe? Yes No Yes No Yes


Best Overall Ski Gloves


Arc'teryx Fission SV


82
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Warmth 7.0
  • Dexterity 8.0
  • Water Resistance 10.0
  • Durability 8.0
  • Features 7.0
Waterproof material: Gore-Tex | Gauntlet or cuff: Gauntlet
Fantastic weather resistance
Excellent dexterity and comfort
Lightweight and very compressible
Can take a beating
Expensive
Lacks wrist cinch

The Arc'teryx Fission SV is the all-around highest performing glove in our review. Other gloves might be better for specific tasks, but nothing performs as well across the board. If we could have only one glove for skiing and snowboarding, this model would be it. This glove particularly excels in weather resistance, dexterity, and durability. It is the most storm-proof glove on the market, with a Gore-Tex membrane and water-resistant materials. The fingers are packed with insulation, but that doesn't hinder their dexterity, and they are the most dexterous glove for the warmth. We used this glove for about 150 days before the leather on the fingers and palm started to wear out, which is excellent compared to other models on the market that tend to fall apart much sooner.

The downsides to this glove are minimal. It lacks an adjustable wrist cinch strap, and has only an internal elastic wrist strap to keep the glove tight on the hand. Our testers also found that this glove runs slightly large, and we recommend purchasing a size down from your regular glove size unless you plan to wear a thin liner inside the glove. The Fission SV is a great glove for most skiers and riders who demand the utmost in weather resistance, warmth, and dexterity. They are also perfect for other winter pursuits like ice climbing, ski mountaineering, snowshoeing, and cold urban travel.

Read review: Arc'teryx Fission SV

best overall ski gloves
A close-up of the Fission SV's gauntlet closure on the left, and tucked into a jacket cuff, of the right.

Best Overall Ski Mittens


Black Diamond Mercury Mitt


64
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Warmth 8.0
  • Dexterity 2.0
  • Water Resistance 8.0
  • Durability 8.0
  • Features 7.0
Waterproof material: BD.dry | Gauntlet or cuff: Gauntlet
Extremely warm
Bomber durability
Great weather resistance
Relatively affordable
Includes insulated liner
Poor dexterity
No included wrist leash

The Black Diamond Mercury Mitt is the best overall mitten in our test group. Users who prefer mittens generally like their warmth, compared to ski gloves, and these are the warmest mittens on the market thanks to their insulated liners, fleece lining, and roomy hand cavity where fingers can share warmth. They are also effective at sealing out liquid water, thanks to a waterproof membrane and large gauntlets. The construction is solid as well, promising a long life. We also like the additional features like the hanging loop for quicker drying and the comfortable nose wipe patch.

The major downside of mittens is that you can't use your individual fingers, and these mitts are not outliers here. The Mercury Mitts have the worst dexterity out of any model that we tested. When warmth is the main concern, dexterity might take a backseat, but these mitts are hard to use for even the most basic tasks like zipping up a jacket or buckling boots. They don't come with a wrist leash, which means that they can easily be lost when taken off, which is bound to happen often due to their lack of dexterity. Still, most folks seek mittens because they find gloves to be too cold. If that's you, these are the best mittens we've ever tested.

Read review: Black Diamond Mercury Mitt

ski gloves - best overall ski mittens
The leather palms tend to wear out over time, but strategically-placed leather reinforcements add some lifetime to the supple palm.
Credit: Jackie Kearney

Best Bang for your Buck


Gordini GTX Storm Trooper II


69
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Warmth 7.0
  • Dexterity 4.0
  • Water Resistance 8.0
  • Durability 8.0
  • Features 9.0
Waterproof material: Gore-Tex | Gauntlet or cuff: Gauntlet
Warm enough
Versatile
Bomber construction
Inexpensive
Good weather resistance
Tight fit around the knuckles
Poor dexterity

Ski gloves come and go, but the Gordini GTX Storm Trooper II has been around for a long time, and we hope it stays that way. Our testers are continually impressed by how well this glove can hang with the big dogs while costing significantly less. This glove is more than capable of meeting the needs of the average resort skier. It has a lot of leather for the price, boosting its longevity into multiple ski seasons. It's also very waterproof — we never experienced cold or wet hands in these gloves.

While these gloves are warm enough for most days at the ski resort, they can't compare to other well-insulated or heated models. They pack insulation around the fingertips, which hinders dexterity for general tasks and rules out fine motor skills, like opening small zippers or searching for items in pockets. We'd recommend a more dexterous glove for users with more refined dexterity needs, like on-snow professionals or parents. Still, for the price, these shortcomings are minor, and we would recommend these gloves to anyone who needs high-performance gloves at a bargain price.

Read review: Gordini GTX Storm Trooper II

ski gloves - best bang for your buck
The Storm Trooper II repels moisture easily and is surprisingly weather resistant. The handwarmer pocket zippers are a weakness in the armor.
Credit: sam willits

Best for Warmth


Outdoor Research Lucent Heated Sensor


77
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Warmth 9.0
  • Dexterity 6.0
  • Water Resistance 8.0
  • Durability 7.0
  • Features 9.0
Waterproof material: Gore-Tex | Gauntlet or cuff: Gauntlet
Battery-powered warmth
Excellent features
Weather resistant
Good durability
Dexterity good but not great
Expensive

The Outdoor Research Lucent Heated Sensor is a heavily featured glove that takes top honors for warmth. If you ski in the coldest winter climates or regularly have cold fingers, this is the best heated glove on the market. It delivers warmth with a rechargeable lithium-ion battery that heats the entire hand, from the wrist to the fingertips, and has three heat settings that provide as much warmth as you'd ever need. The glove also has an excellent set of features, including a pocket, a touchscreen compatible index fingertip, a wrist cinch strap, gauntlets, knuckle pads, and more.

Other heated gloves on the market deliver as much or more warmth, but this glove provides as much warmth as our testers ever needed on cold days, and while other heated gloves suffer from a complete lack of dexterity, the Lucent remains highly usable even with tons of insulation through the fingers. There are lots of reinforcements on the palm leather, but the thumb pad leather remains exposed introducing a potential durability concern. But this is a minor concern. If you want a supremely warm glove that actually works in the real world, look no further.

Read review: Outdoor Research Lucent Heated Sensor Gloves

ski gloves - best for warmth
Pressing and holding a button on the back of the Lucent turns the heat on, and pressing quickly changes the setting between high heat, medium, and low.
Credit: Jackie Kearney

Best for Backcountry Skiing


Arc'teryx Sabre


75
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Warmth 6.0
  • Dexterity 9.0
  • Water Resistance 8.0
  • Durability 9.0
  • Features 4.0
Waterproof material: Gore-Tex | Gauntlet or cuff: Cuff
Exceptionally dexterous
Durable and well-built
Warm enough for most days
Good weather resistance
Light on features

The Arc'teryx Sabre is a warm, waterproof, and durable glove that is exceptionally dexterous for the weight. It features enough lightweight synthetic insulation for most cold days, durable yet supple palm leather and a Gore-Tex insert to keep water out, and a velcro cuff closure that fits cleanly beneath a jacket cuff. The glove is lined with a soft furry material, making it feel very cozy and comfortable while integrating smart tailoring and stitching to preserve dexterity. For backcountry skiers who need a glove that will keep them warm and dry without compromising their ability to use their fingers, this glove is perfect.

Still, the glove is not as warm as others in the review, and on days when the temperatures dropped below zero degrees Fahrenheit, we either reached for warmer gloves or had to work hard to keep our fingers warm. The wrist cuff is not as long and protective as the gauntlets on other burly gloves, and there is no nose wipe or zippered pockets. For advanced users who know how to keep their hands warm and who like to wear their gloves inside their jacket cuffs, these are a great choice.

Read review: Arc'teryx Sabre Glove

Compare Products

select up to 5 products to compare
Score Product Price Our Take
82
$199
Editors' Choice Award
Top-tier performance, coupled with exceptional versatility across a wide range of conditions
77
$359
Top Pick Award
Super-warm heated gloves for the coldest days at any resort
76
$500
This expensive glove is the warmest we have ever tested when fully charged
75
$179
Top Pick Award
A good choice for warmth and weather resistance in a dexterous package
73
$180
If rugged capabilities and warmth top your list of importance, think about investing in this pair
72
$165
A favorite of our testers, this glove is versatile and dexterous
72
$190
Expensive but durable, this leather do-it-all model is cozy and provides sound weather resistance
72
$400
This heated glove also features great durability and weather resistance
71
$226
A great combination of fantastic durability and dexterity, an especially strong option for the resort
70
$159
Buy this glove if you have ambitions to do a great deal of touring in a variety of conditions
69
$70
Best Buy Award
This excellent ski glove provides warmth and weather resistance at a budget-acknowledging price
69
$155
These gloves perform well across the board, but they don't stand out from the pack
65
$150
Very supple for fantastic dexterity, our reviewers found doubt in its durability
64
$120
Editors' Choice Award
Boasting a toasty level of warmth, this mitt protects your hands well at a fair price
63
$115
These gloves are warm and protective, but poor dexterity mars their performance
58
$70
A good mitten at an excellent value, but not as warm as many gloves
58
$95
If you seek a highly versatile price-point glove this is one of your best options
56
$265
A less expensive heated glove that fills niche uses outside of resort skiing
53
$70
Reliable and ringing in at an affordable cost, this model offers many features
47
$50
Missing key aspects that make a good ski glove, their durability makes them capable winter work gloves
47
$50
A mostly leather glove that can handle basic, springtime backcountry tours
44
$50
Functional for in the backcountry or at the resort, but have a relatively small temperature range

lead tester jeff dobronyi at home in the teton backcountry, hard at...
Lead tester Jeff Dobronyi at home in the Teton backcountry, hard at work testing ski gloves and guiding skiers.
Credit: Sam Willits

Why You Should Trust Us


Exum Ski Guide and IFMGA Mountain Guide Jeff Dobronyi leads our test team for this comparative review. Jeff leads skiers on powder safaris worldwide to the best resorts, sidecountry freeride runs, and backcountry ski tours. He logs over 120 days on skis each year and needs gloves that will keep his hands warm and keep water out. He goes through a few pairs of gloves each season and knows which gloves will last and which will fall apart after a few weeks. From rappelling into steep couloirs to digging snowpits and helping skiers climb out of deep powder, Jeff's gloves take a beating.

To find the best ski gloves and mitts available, we started by digging deep into the market. After extensive research of high-quality and popular gloves, we purchased the most intriguing models and sent them to our expert testers. Then we thoroughly used and evaluated each pair and scored them in key performance metrics. We tested warmth by riding chairlifts and skiing in the Cascades, Alps, Wasatch, British Columbia, Jackson Hole, and Northeast US, as well as working in the field with avalanche and snow conditions assessment teams. We tested dexterity by peeling and sticking lift tickets to our jackets, writing notes with the gloves on, buckling boots, and unlocking car doors. We also tested water resistance by dunking the gloves in a bucket of water for two minutes and comparing the results.

Testing the Arc&#039;teryx Fission SV on a cold January day.
Testing the Arc'teryx Fission SV on a cold January day.
Wetting out in the Legend gloves after relatively few days of...
Wetting out in the Legend gloves after relatively few days of employment.
Spraying while wearing the Mercury Mitts.
Spraying while wearing the Mercury Mitts.

Analysis and Test Results


As consumers, we have high expectations of our gloves. Gloves and mittens create a haven for our hands and protect them from the harsh bite of winter air. We rely on our gloves to keep our sensitive fingers warm and sheltered from the elements while resort riding or touring. We don't want them to be too bulky or cumbersome, yet we don't want to sacrifice weather resistance or warmth. If the gloves can perform in all conditions and be versatile across many outdoor sport disciplines, even better. Our expectations of specific award winners are to excel in a light backcountry ski tour and provide the dexterity, durability, and warmth to summit aColorado 14er on a near-zero Fahrenheit day.

ski gloves - ski glove purchase decisions are dependent on how cold it is, where...
Ski glove purchase decisions are dependent on how cold it is, where you ski, or snowboard, how wet it is, and your needs in dexterity, durability, and ease of use.
Credit: Joshua Cole

All of the gloves featured in this review are great products that stand above the vast majority of the market offerings. A low score in our review doesn't mean that the glove is unworthy of your attention. We had to be picky to find the best of the best. All scores are relative to the other products reviewed, and each performance metric is weighted relative to its general importance, which produces an overall score.


Value


Every skier has a budget, and although we strive to test gear without regard for price, we also make a note of products that score above or below what we think is reasonable, given their price. While many of the best gloves are also the most expensive, there are a few options that provide excellent performance at a lower price than similar products. We bought several promising, affordable gloves, and the Gordini GTX Storm Trooper II impressed us the most. It covers the bases better than any model in its price range. It keeps our hands warm and dry and has displayed excellent durability.

field testing ski gloves in colorado.
Field testing ski gloves in Colorado.
Credit: Laraine Martin

In general, the less expensive gloves have less of a focus on durability and dexterity in their materials and construction. When treated properly, real leather should last longer than synthetic fabrics, especially in high-use areas like the palms and fingertips. Genuine leather is also more expensive, which means you'll have to pay more for higher-quality gloves. Warmth is usually correlated with price, as more insulation makes a glove more expensive. Water resistance can be achieved without using expensive Gore-Tex membranes, although in general, Gore-Tex gloves proved more weatherproof in our tests than the less expensive alternatives. It takes skilled garment designers to put all of the components together in a warm, waterproof, and durable glove without sacrificing dexterity. We were impressed by the Arc'teryx Fission SV because it combines all of the performance attributes into a comfortable and streamlined glove that is a pleasure to wear. However, you'll pay for this performance. The warmest gloves on the market have battery-powered internal heating devices, which are nice for early mornings on the slopes and during the winter's coldest days. These gloves are universally more expensive than even the most pricey unheated model.

the fission sv excelled in a variety of conditions and lasted a long...
The Fission SV excelled in a variety of conditions and lasted a long time. As such, it is a great value despite its high price tag.

Warmth


Every skier and rider demands a different level of warmth from their gloves or mittens. Some people run cold and are always taking breaks to warm up their hands. Other people can ski all day wearing no more than leather work gloves. Skiers and riders in wetter climates, like the rainy Pacific Northwest or Atlantic Northeast, need gloves that will repel water and remain breathable on warmer days. In contrast, skiers in the drier, colder climates, like the Rocky Mountains, need a lot of warmth for below-zero temperatures.


We spent over 100 days skiing and snowboarding in these gloves with a backpack full of contenders, cycling through them all day. Testers also wore different gloves on each hand during the same runs and chairlift rides to do a true side-by-side warmth comparison. We tested palm insulation by holding ice axes and ski poles on cold ski tours.

testing warmth during a high-altitude traverse.
Testing warmth during a high-altitude traverse.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Except for the heated gloves (more on that below), the warmest glove we tested was the Black Diamond Guide. Tester Ian Nicholson used them to summit two mountains over 20,000 ft above sea level and never changed into his mittens, despite summit temperatures as low as -42F. The next warmest contender is the Outdoor Research Alti. While only slightly less warm, they have been worn by tester Jeff Rogers on Mt. Washington in New Hampshire with an ambient temperature of -38F and 70mph winds, resulting in a -80F windchill. He still has his fingers. The Gordini Storm Trooper II, Fission SV, and Outdoor Research Carbide Sensor also provide enough warmth for our testers on cold winter days at a ski resort. On the other hand, the REI Guide Insulated seemed to have little more warming capabilities than your average leather work glove.

the resounding favorite among our testers, the fission sv provides...
The resounding favorite among our testers, the Fission SV provides enough warmth for all but the coldest days in the mountains.

Mitten Warmth

This one was pretty easy to determine. We found the Black Diamond Mercury Mitt to be the top dog by a wide margin. The North Face Montana Futurelight Etip Mitt is more dexterous due to a thinner insulating layer and individual finger slots, but it won't keep you as warm as the synthetic insulation and fleece lining of the Mercury. Both mitten options are warmer than most of the unheated glove options.

mittens provide more warmth than gloves. if you get cold hands...
Mittens provide more warmth than gloves. If you get cold hands easily or ski in very cold climates, mittens might be the right choice for you.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Heated Glove Warmth

Many manufacturers now offer gloves that produce heat internally instead of solely retaining your hand's natural warmth. We tested the Black Diamond Solano, Outdoor Research StormTracker Heated, Outdoor Research Capstone, and Outdoor Research Lucent. Each glove has three heat settings. Usually, the lowest setting lasted all day on a full charge, while the highest setting usually drained the batteries within a couple of hours during our tests. These gloves are able to take our hands from numb to warm in a matter of minutes at the press of a button. For the Capstone and the Solano, some of our testers preferred to blast them on high for a few minutes and then turn them off to save battery power. We usually left the thin StormTracker gloves on low heat for the entire day. The Lucent provides heat evenly from the hand to the fingertips, making the lowest heat setting more useful because the heat doesn't have to make its way to the fingertips from the back of the hand.

on a great powder day, smiles like this are hard to remove from our...
On a great powder day, smiles like this are hard to remove from our faces. Adding to our satisfaction is knowing that we're wearing some of the hottest heated gloves we've ever tested, the OR Capstone.
Credit: Sam Willits

With two dual-cell batteries per hand, the Capstone is the warmest of the heated models, both with and without the heating element turned on. It also has a wrist cinch that helps seal heat inside the glove. The Lucent is our favorite amongst the heated options because it delivers plenty of heat while also remaining dexterous and useable. The Solano is a touch thinner and less warm without the electricity turned on. The StormTracker comes in at a lower price but lacks durability and insulation and is especially cold when the batteries die. The thin softshell construction makes them lightweight and dexterous but does not make up for the lack of warmth.

the capstone provides the most warmth out of any heated glove in our...
The Capstone provides the most warmth out of any heated glove in our review, thanks to its two-battery per hand internal heating system. Dexterity suffers as a result of the large amount of insulation in this pair.
Credit: Sam Willits

Dexterity


To test dexterity, we skied in the gloves all day and attempted to perform every necessary task without removing them. We also performed objective tests by doing a series of side-by-side tasks to make clear distinctions between products. These tasks included reaching into pockets for car keys, attaching lift tickets to pockets, using zippers, adjusting goggles on a helmet, tying the laces on winter boots, tying climbing knots with rope, and writing legibly with a pen on paper.


The REI Guide Insulated easily wins the dexterity category with its thin fingers and minimal insulation. The glove also lacks a waterproof membrane or effective insulation, making them relatively useless for most days at the ski area. However, for those who need a dexterous glove for milder conditions, such as ski instructors, backcountry skiers, or ski patrollers, these are a great choice as a second, lighter, inexpensive glove. We were blown away by the excellent dexterity of the Arc'teryx Sabre, given the gloves' solid warmth and water resistance. The Hestra Leather Fall Line also provides excellent dexterity and slightly more insulation. We were impressed by the dexterity of the relatively warm Black Diamond Legend, but the supple leather on the fingers and palm wore out quickly. The Fission SV is close behind, with great dexterity and none of the aforementioned downsides. That balance is a significant reason why the Fission SV is our top choice overall.

the sabre&#039;s palm leather is supple and dexterous, yet highly durable...
The Sabre's palm leather is supple and dexterous, yet highly durable and resistant to wear. We've found this combination to be rare, but this glove nails it.
Credit: jeff dobronyi

Among the heated gloves, the Stormtracker offers good dexterity, while the Capstone is too bulky to perform most tasks. That said, the Capstone has well-tailored fingers that impressed us but has two heavy batteries per hand that made the glove feel unwieldy and clumsy. The Lucent strikes the best balance between warmth and dexterity in this sub-class of gloves, ultimately leading to it emerging as our favorite heated model.

the lucent is dexterous enough to adjust clothing without taking the...
The Lucent is dexterous enough to adjust clothing without taking the gloves off.
Credit: Jackie Kearney

Among the mitts, The North Face Montana Futurelight Etip is the most dextrous. It has individual finger slots, compared to the cavernous hand space that most mittens are known for. This feature increases dexterity, but sacrifices warmth. If you need the warmth of a mitten but don't want a heated option and require some dexterity, the BD Guide Glove is almost as warm as a mitten.

jussi tahtinen with the hestra army leather showing that its...
Jussi Tahtinen with the Hestra Army Leather showing that its dexterity is up to the task while climbing ladders out of the Pas de Chèvres, Switzerland.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Water Resistance


In some climates, like the Pacific Northwest and the Northeast, water is encountered regularly. In others, like the Rocky Mountains, dry snow is the norm. We wore each glove in wet weather in Washington and British Columbia and tested for water resistance using a 2-minute submersion test in a water bucket. The best gloves kept all liquid water out of the interior chamber and resisted soaking in the outer shell fabric. The worst performers soaked through quickly and lack an adequate waterproof membrane.


The Fission SV is the most water-resistant glove in our review. Its softshell exterior and sturdy leather easily repelled occasional water droplets, and the Gore-Tex membrane prevented any water from penetrating the interior of the glove. A large gauntlet and cinch cord further sealed out the elements. We were also impressed by the weather resistance of the OR Alti and Black Diamond Guide. The Montana and Mercury mitts also performed well during water resistance testing and kept water out completely.

here we are testing the different models during our two-minute...
Here we are testing the different models during our two-minute "bucket of water" test.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Aside from the fabric itself, water can also enter a glove through the wrist opening. Most gloves in our review feature a large wrist gauntlet with a drawstring closure that overlaps with a jacket's wrist cuff, making a formidable defense against water trying to enter the glove. This gauntlet, as seen on the Mercury Mitt, BD Guide, and Fission SV, among others, can be worn on the outside or the inside of a jacket sleeve.

the capstone proved to be one of the most water-resistant gloves in...
The Capstone proved to be one of the most water-resistant gloves in our test, repelling any water, liquid or frozen, that we threw at it.
Credit: Sam Willits

Of the heated gloves, the OR Capstone kept water out entirely, and the OR Lucent also performed well thanks to a Gore-Tex membrane, tight stitching, and a large gauntlet. In fact, all of the heated gloves kept water out effectively, except for the Outdoor Research Stormtracker Heated, which is a softshell glove.

the outdoor research lucent has a water-tight construction and great...
The Outdoor Research Lucent has a water-tight construction and great gauntlets that fit over most insulated jacket sleeves.
Credit: Jackie Kearney

Durability


We measured durability based on our experiences with each model. We punished these products during the testing period with daily and prolonged use over multiple ski seasons. We also utilized valuable input from dozens of other users and OutdoorGearLab friends.


We're continually impressed with Hestra's offerings, which feature excellent design and craftsmanship, as well as high-quality materials, model after model. Other impressive models include the Black Diamond Guide, Marmot Ultimate, Fission SV, and Arc'teryx Sabre. All have a beefy leather exterior and stood up to whatever our testing team threw at them. Regarding the budget-friendly options, the Gordini GTX Storm Trooper II provides impressive longevity.

Well-tailored fingers and low-profile leather reinforcements of the...
Well-tailored fingers and low-profile leather reinforcements of the Fission SV make this one of the most dexterous of the warm gloves that we tested.
The goat leather palm is soft and supple, yet quite durable.
The goat leather palm is soft and supple, yet quite durable.

Some gloves wore out quickly during our testing. The REI Guide Insulated showed significant wear and tear on the leather palm after only a few days of use, and the internal liner developed a hole in one of the fingers early on. We were also disappointed in the Black Diamond Legend's durability, which has incredibly supple palm leather, but wore down and developed holes quickly. This was a bummer because if the leather were a bit more durable, the Legend would be a top contender.

After relatively gentle use, the Legend already showed signs of wear...
After relatively gentle use, the Legend already showed signs of wear on the palm during our test period, including holes in the leather and thin spots.
The thick pigskin leather of the Ridge Glove should help them last...
The thick pigskin leather of the Ridge Glove should help them last several seasons.

Features


Ski gloves come with a set of features that augment the glove's performance and make your day more convenient and comfortable on the ski hill. We inspected and used all of the features on each glove to get a good idea of which had a robust set of tools and which were bare-bones. We compared features such as gauntlet or cuff closures, wrist cinches, nose wipes, wrist leashes, clips, and heating elements. We also noted if the gloves came with liners.


the nose wipe on the bd mercury mitt is soft and comfortable.
The nose wipe on the BD Mercury Mitt is soft and comfortable.
Credit: Jackie Kearney

We were impressed with the Mercury Mitt's thoughtful design, including features like a wrist cinch, nose wipe, and removable liners. We also liked the set of features found on the very similar BD Guide and OR Alti. Surprisingly, the Gordini Storm Trooper II also packs a full set of features, including a nose wipe, wrist cinch, thoughtful gantlet, and clips.

the inner glove of the alti proved to be a great glove on its own...
The inner glove of the Alti proved to be a great glove on its own. Having a double glove design is a feature we love, especially in the backcountry.
Credit: Jeff Rogers

Phones are an essential tool in our daily life, and the glove market has recognized their necessity by providing touchscreen-compatible gloves. The liners of the Outdoor Research Highcamp and Dakine Titan are touchscreen compatible. Many gloves claim to include sensitive pads on the tips of the forefingers, but in our tests, cold phone screens and even colder gloves had a hard time getting along. We couldn't get any glove's touchscreen pad to work consistently, though they all work most of the time.

touchscreen compatibility might be more important to some people...
Touchscreen compatibility might be more important to some people than others.
Credit: Amber King

Conclusion


With so many ski gloves and mittens on the market, it can be daunting to try to find the best pair for your needs. Our expert testers sorted through the field and tested the best of the best. They assessed each pair's strengths and weaknesses, allowing you to easily find the best glove or mitten for your preferences and your budget. From light and dexterous gloves for warm spring days to heavily insulated options for the coldest winter ski trips, there is something in this review for everyone. Happy shopping, and we'll see you on the slopes.

Jeff Dobronyi, Ian Nicholson, Jeff Rogers, and Travis Poulin


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