The world's most in-depth and scientific reviews of outdoor gear

How We Tested Backpacking Pack for Women

Tuesday November 5, 2019
We wore these packs on and off trail in every climate the US has to offer. We also handed them around to every woman who would wear them to see how they worked for different body types and preferences.
We wore these packs on and off trail in every climate the US has to offer. We also handed them around to every woman who would wear them to see how they worked for different body types and preferences.

Many years have gone into compiling this list of top backpacking packs for women. From quick overnights in the Front Range to two-week trips in the Wind River Range and jaunts to the John Muir Trail, remote canyons in Utah and long hikes on Vermont's Long Trail, these packs have seen it all. We've trekked through torrential downpours, snow, wind, hail, sleet, and overwhelming heat to figure out which is the best for any given backcountry situation. Our trips ranged from short day hikes to 27 mile days that carried on into the night. In short, we use and abuse these packs, all while taking notes on their functionality, comfort, and support.

Our testers' body types range widely as well. They're short. They're tall. They're curvy, petite, lanky or muscled. These women also have wildly different backpacking experience levels — some are newbies, others are long-time backcountry travelers. This helps us gain a broad perspective of how comfortable, adjustable, and easy to use each of these packs really is.

Comfort and Suspension


To compare comfort and suspension on each pack we loaded them up with quick overnight gear as well as weighed them down with 6 days of food for 2 people, climbing ropes, winter gear, etc. We looked at how well the suspension transferred weight to our hips versus resting on our shoulders. We contemplated the positioning and stability of the hip belt: does it stay in place, sag toward the back, curve up in front, shift when we bend and twist climbing over downed trees? Does the padding of the shoulder straps and hip belt feel soft or rigid? Does it stand up to multiple days of heavy loads or begin to crumple? How easy is the pack to get on and off? We had women of all shapes and sizes wearing each model to determine if the comfort was versatile for many body shapes or just a few.

The bend in the padding at the lumbar is not the natural pack design but a buckled piece of material that couldn't stand up to even light loads.
The bend in the padding at the lumbar is not the natural pack design but a buckled piece of material that couldn't stand up to even light loads.

Weight


We broke out the kitchen scale and weighed each model down to the tenth of an ounce. We considered the weight compared to other models as well as the weight compared to the comfort, ability to carry a load, and the number of features offered. Sometimes we felt a heavier model's weight was worth it due to its comfort and sometimes we wished a lighter pack had added a few more ounces to offer the comfort needed to carry it day in and day out.

Organizational Systems


We shoved all manner of gear in and out of every pocket we could fit it into. We tried each pack out on the trail for multiple days, giving ourselves a chance to learn new packing systems and make a fair judgment based on experienced use rather than just personal preference based on our own history. We loaded back stash pockets to the max, tried out all the hydration options, and endured heavy snacking on the go to see what we could fit in each hip belt pocket. We considered not only how large the pockets were but also how easy they were to get into and how visible our gear was inside the sometimes dark cavernous bag.

Yes  a smartphone fits  but what's really important is how much candy will share the space. The answer? A whole bag of Swedish Fish.
Yes, a smartphone fits, but what's really important is how much candy will share the space. The answer? A whole bag of Swedish Fish.

Adjustability


Each model has a different level of adjustability as well as a different system. Some took time to get to learn, others were intuitive and fast, and some were just too much of a hassle to recommend. We lengthened and shortened every torso and hip belt possible. We took measurements and looked at the range of waist sizes each pack will fit. We considered interchangeable belts and padding. Versatility also played into our adjustability testing. Some packs have options to change and remove features and straps. Some allow for bulky items to be strapped on the outside, while others were clearly designed for almost everything to be loaded into the main compartment. Those with a lot of options typically scored high but a few were overly complicated to use and actually lost points.


Yes, these subjects were put through the wringer both in the backcountry and in our labs. And each year, we continue to search out the new options on the market, the re-designed models, and the old favorites to test and re-test for the most thorough review available.