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Outdoor Research Capstone Heated Sensor Review

For the coldest conditions on earth.
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Price:  $500 List | $500.00 at Amazon
Pros:  Extremely warm, weather resistant
Cons:  Very expensive, heavy, bulky
Manufacturer:   Outdoor Research
By Jeff Dobronyi ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Feb 11, 2020
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79
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#3 of 19
  • Warmth - 25% 10
  • Dexterity - 25% 5
  • Water Resistance - 25% 9
  • Durability - 15% 7
  • Features - 10% 8

Our Verdict

The Outdoor Research Capstone Heated Sensor offers the utmost performance in weather resistance and internal heating on the market. These gloves are massive and burly, almost to a fault. Two heavy batteries per hand make each glove a veritable oven. Despite the bulky size and shape, the fingers are actually surprisingly dexterous and feature touchscreen-compatible leather for pushing larger buttons. They are relatively durable, although long-term battery life might not be that impressive. These are niche gloves for the coldest conditions on earth and will be overkill for most days on the ski slopes. If you live and shred in the coldest climates or want to use these for other cold-weather uses, you might be able to justify the high price.


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Overall Score Sort Icon
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Star Rating
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Pros Extremely warm, weather resistantVersatility, durable palm, lightweight and packable, dexterous, ergonomic shape, freedom of movementGreat fit and dexterity, weather resistant, electrical heat works, great glove even when turned offSuper warm, extremely tough, great weather resistance, removable liners help them dry quicker, our go-to expedition gloveDexterous for its warmth, inside feels soft and cozy, durable, above average weather resistance
Cons Very expensive, heavy, bulkyLong gauntlet tricky to get under jacket, gauntlet can slowly open, expensiveDoesn't get as warm as other heated gloves, expensiveNot very dexterous, take time to break in, if in between sizes you should consider sizing upExpensive, leather needs to be retreated slightly more than other models
Bottom Line This expensive glove is the warmest we have ever tested.Top-tier performance, coupled with exceptional versatility across a wide range of conditions. Best in Class.Well-built ski gloves that perform even when the heat is turned off.If rugged capabilities and warmth top your list of importance, think about investing in the Guide.Expensive but durable, this leather all-arounder is cozy and provides sound weather resistance.
Rating Categories Capstone Heated Sensor Arc'teryx Fission SV Hestra Power Heater Glove Black Diamond Guide Hestra Army Leather Gore-Tex
Warmth (25%)
10
0
10
10
0
6
10
0
8
10
0
8
10
0
6
Dexterity (25%)
10
0
5
10
0
9
10
0
8
10
0
4
10
0
6
Water Resistance (25%)
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
8
10
0
9
10
0
9
Durability (15%)
10
0
7
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
9
Features (10%)
10
0
8
10
0
7
10
0
6
10
0
9
10
0
8
Specs Capstone Heated... Arc'teryx Fission SV Hestra Power... Black Diamond Guide Hestra Army...
Double or Single Glove Single Single Single Double Single
Gaunlet or Cuff? Gauntlet Gauntlet Hybrid Gauntlet Gauntlet
Palm Material Goat leather Leather Goat leather Goat leather Army Leather (goat leather)
Waterproof Material Gore-Tex insert Gore-Tex CZone Gore-Tex insert HESTRA Triton three-layer polyamide fabric, leather
Insulation Type Back of hand: 200 g/m2 PrimaLoft HiLoft Silver
Palm: 133g/m2 EnduraLoft
133g Primaloft Gold Eco and 200g Primaloft Silver Eco Fiberfill polyester 170g PrimaLoft Gold and 100g boiled wool fleece lining Fiberfill polyester
Nose Wipe? Yes Yes No Yes No

Our Analysis and Test Results

These gloves stood above the rest for warmth and weather protection, but lose versatility and dexterity in the process. Everyday skiers should look for lighter model that will be appropriate for a wide range of temperatures and that have more dexterity.

Performance Comparison


Rocking the OR Capstone Heated Sensor on a cold powder day in Jackson Hole  Wyoming.
Rocking the OR Capstone Heated Sensor on a cold powder day in Jackson Hole, Wyoming.

Warmth


If you are searching for the warmest gloves, look no further. Each hand uses two dual-cell rechargeable lithium-ion batteries to produce more heat than you'll ever need. Even on the lowest setting with one battery per hand, these gloves are warm enough for most conditions you'll encounter on the ski slopes. They are warm enough to be used for even colder activities like snowmobiling, ice fishing, on-snow coaching, or outdoor winter sporting events. The batteries last 6 hours on the lowest setting, and about 4 hours on the lowest setting if you only use one battery per hand. There is a high, medium, and low setting, like most heated gloves we've tested.


Even without the heating element turned on, these gloves kept our hands warm in temperatures down to zero degrees Fahrenheit in Jackson Hole and British Columbia. Synthetic insulation throughout the entire glove is strategically placed to keep the hand and fingers toasty in any conditions. These would be great gloves for cold mountaineering trips to the highest mountains on earth.


Dexterity


With so much insulation and a powerful heating element, we didn't expect the Capstone to deliver too much in the way of dexterity. We were somewhat surprised to find that the fingers are tailored enough to perform most basic tasks. They can open a zipper, remove a phone, and push a larger button. But don't expect to be able to type text messages.

Despite the overall bulk of the glove  we found the fingers to be well-tailored and somewhat useful for most tasks  like opening a zipper.
Despite the overall bulk of the glove, we found the fingers to be well-tailored and somewhat useful for most tasks, like opening a zipper.

The glove is generally bulky with the heating element, insulation, and two batteries per hand, impeding some range of motion in the wrist. Furthermore, the battery weight is definitely noticeable when raising your gloved hands. Some testers felt like they had "Hulk Hands" when wearing these gloves.

The Capstone is bulky with insulation  a heating element  and 2 batteries per hand. Some testers used the term "Hulk hands" to describe the feeling.
The Capstone is bulky with insulation, a heating element, and 2 batteries per hand. Some testers used the term "Hulk hands" to describe the feeling.

Water Resistance


With a Gore-Tex membrane, leather outer fabric, and large gauntlet cuffs, these gloves effectively seal out all water from entering the glove. During wet, snowy days on the slopes in British Columbia, these gloves were used to wipe the water off the chairlift seat and to clean wet snow off the car at the end of the day, and never did we feel like water penetration was an issue.

The Gore-Tex lined Capstone keeps water out and doesn't absorb much water either.
The Gore-Tex lined Capstone keeps water out and doesn't absorb much water either.

Durability


We have had no problems with this glove's durability throughout our testing period. After a bit of breaking in, the palm leather has become softer, but there are no signs of any broken stitching. Extra layers of leather are stitched onto the palm to prevent holes in high-use areas. Many online reviewers have mentioned that the battery life is questionable, claiming the need to replace the batteries every season (extra batteries are sold separately). Outdoor Research has an excellent warranty program, and they should replace any product that shows premature durability issues. In our experiences with their warranty program, they have provided excellent service on multiple occasions.

The Capstone's palm is reinforced with multiple layers of leather in high-use areas and strong stitching.
The Capstone's palm is reinforced with multiple layers of leather in high-use areas and strong stitching.

Features


This glove is loaded with features that make your day on the hill easy. Wrist leashes are included and are easily removable if you don't want to use them. The gloves clip together for easy hanging, and for preventing glove separation during travel. There is a velcro wrist cinch, elastic gauntlet cuff closure, easy-to-grasp gauntlet release button, and two battery pockets that could be used for other small items. The back of the palm and knuckles are padded, and there is a softer fabric on the outer thumb for comfortable nose wiping. It's also touchscreen compatible, although a lack of dexterity holds them back from being all that usable with a phone.

A soft fabric on the outer thumb makes nose wiping much more comfortable.
A soft fabric on the outer thumb makes nose wiping much more comfortable.

Value


This glove is extremely expensive, and few users will be able to justify the cost. For pure skiing purposes, other gloves in our review are less expensive and just as useful. If you need the warmest heated glove on the market for skiing and other cold-weather activities, you might be able to justify the high price tag. But for most skiers, these gloves are too expensive for what you get.

Conclusion


The Capstone Heated Sensor is a niche product that provides the most warmth we have found in a heated glove. For most skiers looking to keep their hands warm on first chair and during fierce storms, this glove is overkill, but for users who need a glove to keep frostbite at bay during the coldest days of the winter in arctic climates, this is a well-constructed and relatively dexterous option.

The OR Capstone keeping our editor warm and dry on a powder day in Golden  British Columbia.
The OR Capstone keeping our editor warm and dry on a powder day in Golden, British Columbia.


Jeff Dobronyi