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Contour Hybrid Mix Review

Virtually every aspect of skin design and construction is balanced by another competing demand; it walks that tightrope, creating a product that is fully balanced
Contour Hybrid Mix
Photo: Contour
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Price:  $180 List | $179.95 at Backcountry
Compare prices at 2 resellers
Pros:  Well balanced in all attributes, great glue
Cons:  Largest and heaviest messenger
Manufacturer:   Contour
By Jediah Porter ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Feb 11, 2020
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54
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#8 of 13
  • Glide - 30% 7
  • Grip - 15% 5
  • Glue Integrity - 20% 2
  • Portability - 20% 6
  • Icing Resistance - 10% 6
  • Compatibility - 5% 7

Our Verdict

These skins are mostly "just right". They aren't the best at any one thing, and that is by design. They also aren't the worst at any one thing. Virtually every performance attribute is balanced by another. Maximize glide, say, and you reduce grip. And the same goes for virtually every assessment criteria. Inherently, good climbing skins are going to be compromises. The Contour Hybrid Mix is well balanced, except when it comes to glue performance. To make these stick reliably, you need to be diligent with various glue preservation techniques in the field.

Product Updated

The latest incarnation of this skin is the Hybrid Mix 115. The new model has augmented tip and tail clips, the latter of which is designed to lay flatter than the previous tail clips, even on rounded ski tails. We're linking to the updated model above, but as we've yet to test out that version, the review to follow still pertains to the Hybrid Mix 110 we tested previously.

July 2020

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Contour Hybrid Mix
This Product
Contour Hybrid Mix
Awards  Editors' Choice Award Top Pick Award Top Pick Award Top Pick Award 
Price $179.95 at Backcountry
Compare at 2 sellers
$210 List$210 List$209.00 at Amazon$235 List
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Pros Well balanced in all attributes, great glueLight, fast gliding, enough grip, optimized glue, universal tip and tailLight, fast, compactLight, fast glidingSuper light, good-enough grip and glide, low maintenance stick
Cons Largest and heaviest messengerMohair blend will wear out faster than all nylon, harder to find than other brandsCompromised grip, compromised durabilityDurability concerns, limited gripMoody adhesive, finicky tail clip
Bottom Line Strikes a careful balance that is just rightClimbing skins inherently strike compromises; winner of our top award, it balances competing demands better than any otherFor skilled skinners and efficiency hounds on cold snow there are no better skins availableYou get exceptional glide, but pay for that with durability, grip, and some icing resistanceUltra light, low-maintenance, high performance skins for discerning users in specific applications
Rating Categories Contour Hybrid Mix Pomoca Climb Pro S Glide Pomoca Race Back Fix Pomoca Climb Pro Mohair Colltex Combin Mohair
Glide (30%)
7
8
9
9
8
Grip (15%)
5
8
4
4
6
Glue Integrity (20%)
2
7
7
7
5
Portability (20%)
6
7
8
7
9
Icing Resistance (10%)
6
7
5
5
5
Compatibility (5%)
7
7
7
7
7
Specs Contour Hybrid Mix Pomoca Climb Pro S... Pomoca Race Back Fix Pomoca Climb Pro... Colltex Combin...
Measured Weight 1.21 lbs 1.23 lbs 1.09 lbs 1 lb .86 lbs
Material 70% Mohair, 30% Synthetic 70% mohair and 30% nylon 100% mohair 100% Mohair 100% Mohair
Weight Per Pair 551 for Blizzard Zero G 558g for Salomon MTN Explore 95 496g for Kastle TX 103 452g for Atomic Backland 392g for Movement Alp Tracks 100
Glue Hybrid glue technology Traditional Traditional Traditional Silicone
Tip Attachment Rigid tip loop Rigid tip loop Rigid tip loop Rigid tip loop Rigid tip loop
Tail Attachment Vinyl strap and cam hook Rubber strap and cam hook Rubber strap and cam hook Rubber strap and cam hook Vinyl strap and cam hook
Ski Compatibility Universal Universal Universal Universal Universal
Precut Option? Order for length and approximate width, cut to lateral shape Order for length and approximate width, cut to lateral shape Order for length and approximate width, cut to lateral shape Order for length and approximate width, cut to lateral shape Order for length and approximate width, cut to lateral shape

Our Analysis and Test Results

Despite lofty claims, these are solid, traditional climbing skins, built to strike an outstanding balance. The product is well-executed, but we wish the glue were stickier. Catalog copy from Contour suggests revolutionary glue performance; we found the glue to be inadequate in some circumstances and in some hands. Each glue "revolution" in climbing skins seems to fall short of the basic program that has worked for decades. On a micro level, we're sure that the Contour Hybrid glue system is indeed nuanced. However, in application, it works as well as the other average to below-average glues on the market.

Performance Comparison


High and wild skinning in Grand Teton National Park on the Hybrid Mix.
High and wild skinning in Grand Teton National Park on the Hybrid Mix.
Photo: Jediah Porter

Glide


Glide is the most important, and therefore most highly weighted, performance attribute for your climbing skins. For efficiency, skins need to glide forward. However, maximize glide, and you entirely lose grip. There will always be a sweet spot, and for different users, that sweet spot may move around. Beginning backcountry skiers want more grip and less glide. Improve your skinning technique, and you need less grip and want more glide. A small number of folks will want more glide and less grip, and a similarly small number of people will want more grip and less glide. However, the big, center of the bell curve of users will dig the exact balance that the Hybrid Mix skins strike. On the Contour skins you can slide down gentle hills and swinging your foot forward is largely unencumbered.

The looker's left edge of the pictures skin is beginning to peel up...
The looker's left edge of the pictures skin is beginning to peel up with the inclusion of snow between ski base and skin.
Photo: Jediah Porter

Grip


Grip is the antithesis of glide. Similarly, it needs to be balanced. Of course, maximum grip would be great, but we have to acknowledge that maximum grip has minimum glide. There is always a give and take. In short, the Hybrid Mix skins have enough grip for all but the clumsiest skinners in the gnarliest of conditions.

In balancing grip and glide, the Contour seems to nail the sweet...
In balancing grip and glide, the Contour seems to nail the sweet spot for intermediate to expert backcountry skiers.
Photo: Jediah Porter

Glue Integrity


Glue integrity is actually a combination of the nature of the glue itself and the stiffness of the skin fabric. Sticky glue helps skins stay on skis. Also, and less obvious, stiffer skins stay better on skis. Super soft skin fabric rolls at the edges, letting snow force its way in and leading to glue failure. As in everything skin related, there is a balance to strike. Super sticky glue is great until you need to wrestle skins apart from storage, while super stiff fabric is best for glue integrity until you need to pack them in your jacket front.

The glue and fabric employed by the Hybrid Mix skins stays on your skis worse than most. With fastidious use, they do all you need them to do. Get clumsy, though, and you will pay for it.

The tip loop and front portion of the skin is secure and the hard...
The tip loop and front portion of the skin is secure and the hard plastic plate helps t keep snow from pushing between skin and ski base.
Photo: Jediah Porter

Icing Resistance


The primary variable influencing fabric side icing is skin wax. A waxed skin will always glop less than an unwaxed one. Nonetheless, normalizing for waxing, we still see some differences. The propensity for icing is a function, after wax, of manufacturer pretreatment and percentage of nylon in the fabric. Good pretreatments help, and more nylon helps. It isn't real clear what Contour does to their skins, but our anecdotal experience seems to suggest that icing is reasonable.

The Contour Hybrid glue lets go easily for skins on transitions.
The Contour Hybrid glue lets go easily for skins on transitions.
Photo: Jediah Porter

Portability


Thin fabrics and flexible backing make for a more packable skin. Of course, larger skis require larger skins, which also influences packability. Correcting our assessment for ski size, the Hybrid Mix skins are among the most packable. That they can be so light and compact while still being stiff enough to resist peeling is much appreciated. See? Every design criterion has a counterpart. You can't tug on one part of the skin design equation without affecting another. However, you can tune things to optimize in a couple of directions. The packability attributes of the Contour skins doesn't seem to dramatically compromise other attributes.

The Contour Hybrid mix ready for action on a sunny powder day in...
The Contour Hybrid mix ready for action on a sunny powder day in Wyoming.
Photo: Jediah Porter

Compatibility


Compatibility is easy to assess. Either the skins can be cut to fit a variety of skis, or they are built for one particular make and model. The Hybrid Mix skins are compatible with all skis.

The tensioned tail clip of the Contour Hybrid Mix is secure and...
The tensioned tail clip of the Contour Hybrid Mix is secure and positive, augmenting the performance of the skin glue.
Photo: Jediah Porter

Value


Though these are on the pricier side, we find the the performance is worthwhile.

Conclusion


Skins are saddled with a variety of competing demands. They need to glide and to grip. They need to stick to your skis when you use them and peel off easily when you don't. The bases need to stick to one another for storage and let go for application to your skis. Every single performance attribute is basically balanced by a competing performance attribute. Assessing skins is difficult, as everything is nuanced and balanced; there are tradeoffs. For backcountry skiing and ski mountaineering, as we know it, the Hybrid Mix skins almost nail the sweet spot. Of course, we wish that certain things were better, but we know intimately that improvements in one arena have costs in another attribute.

Jediah Porter