The world's most in-depth and scientific reviews of gear

Dynafit TLT 8 Expedition Review

All-around, well-balanced touring ski boots for those with wide feet and the patience to accessorize for the “Speed Nose” limitations
Dynafit TLT 8 Expedition
Photo: Backcountry
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Price:  $750 List | $599.93 at REI
Compare prices at 3 resellers
Pros:  Well balanced up and downhill performance, simplified construction and use, super high volume fit
Cons:  Speed Nose limits usability, super high volume fit
Manufacturer:   Dynafit
By Jediah Porter ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Feb 20, 2020
  • Share this article:
Our Editors independently research, test, and rate the best products. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Learn more
55
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#11 of 14
  • Uphill Performance - 20% 8
  • Weight - 20% 6
  • Downhill performance - 35% 3
  • Comfort and Fit - 10% 5
  • Warmth - 10% 7
  • Ease of Use - 5% 8

Our Verdict

We put in hard days and hours in the Dynafit TLT 8. Our entire test team has extensive experience with the whole TLT family, since the game-changing TLT5. Performance, efficiency, and usability has steadily increased through each generation. Dynafit took some steps forward and one or two backward, but the TLT 8 seems to be the best of all, in terms of performance. On the other hand, each generation of TLT boot has fit greater than or equal to the volume of the previous. Earlier, this was a good trend. The TLT 6 worked for more skiers than the TLT 5. With the 8, the volume has increased substantially, to the point that it is a niche product that we can only recommend for those that have particularly wide or high volume feet. Of course, you can fill some space with shims and a different liner, but each of these strategies is fraught. Choose your boots for fit. Read our full review below for a comprehensive expansion on all we found in months of testing the TLT 8 Expedition.

Compare to Similar Products

 
Awards  Editors' Choice Award Editors' Choice Award Top Pick Award  
Price $599.93 at REI
Compare at 3 sellers
$719.99 at Amazon
Compare at 2 sellers
$599.21 at Backcountry$599.99 at Amazon
Compare at 2 sellers
$674.21 at Backcountry
Compare at 3 sellers
Overall Score Sort Icon
55
68
67
62
61
Star Rating
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Pros Well balanced up and downhill performance, simplified construction and use, super high volume fitExcellent downhill performance, light weight, proven styleLight, free-pivot cuff, appropriate stiffness and flexExcellent downhill performance, durable, warm, reliable, familiarStiff, comfy fit, Intuition liner
Cons Speed Nose limits usability, super high volume fitModerate insulation, hard to get in and out ofCold, finicky transitionsVery limited uphill and foot-travel performance, heavyHeavy, high friction cuff pivot
Bottom Line Simple, clean, all-purpose AT footwear for the subset of the ski population that has high volume feetFor only the most specialized of needs (super wide feet, high speed climbers, big-cliff-huckers) will it be overwhelmed; this is an excellent ski boot that quietly entered the market and crushes the competitionFor all-around skiing with a light and fast preference, this is a great choiceExcellent for short climbing sessions interspersed with largely mechanized access backcountry skiingFor “crossover” use, choose the right binding, bigger skis, and, if it fits, it can be used for both occasional short human powered runs and inbounds skiing
Rating Categories Dynafit TLT 8 Expedition Tecnica Zero G Tour Pro Scarpa F1 LT Lange XT3 120 Scarpa Maestrale XT
Uphill Performance (20%)
8
6
8
1
3
Weight (20%)
6
5
9
2
4
Downhill Performance (35%)
3
8
5
10
8
Comfort And Fit (10%)
5
8
8
8
7
Warmth (10%)
7
6
5
9
9
Ease Of Use (5%)
8
7
5
7
6
Specs Dynafit TLT 8... Tecnica Zero G... Scarpa F1 LT Lange XT3 120 Scarpa Maestrale XT
Weight size 26.5, pair 5 lbs 5 oz 6 lbs 0 oz 4 lbs 7 oz 7 lbs 11 oz 6 lbs 13 oz
Weight of one boot shell n/o 1119 g 809 g 1398 g 1237 g
Weight of one stock liner, no footbed n/o 204 g 214 g 352 g 308 g
Weight of one complete boot, grams 1205 g 1323 g 1023 g 1750 g 1545 g
Range of Motion; degrees 52 55 72 34 55
Binding Compatibility? Tech only, or Tech and DIN AT standard, or Tech, DIN AT and DIN Alpine/WTR Tech only Tech and DIN AT Tech only Tech, DIN AT, Grip Walk Tech and DIN AT
Stated Flex Index Not reported 130 95 120 125
Stated Last width 103 mm 99 mm 102 mm 100 mm 101 mm
Alpine wrap or Tongue Tongue Wrap Tongue Wrap Tongue
Shell material Grilamid Grilamid Grilamid, Carbon Core Polyurethane Carbon Grilamid

Our Analysis and Test Results

Buzz and attention, in terms of marketing, has shifted to both ends of the touring boot spectrum. The Dynafit TLT 8 sits squarely, now, in the middle of the touring boot range. As such, it sort of escapes attention in terms of PR. The fact is that most people should be in a boot like this one. They tour uphill like a dream. With just the most rudimentary of technique adjustment, you can ski downhill, similar to how you would with beefier equipment.

The boots are lightweight but robust enough for multiple seasons of enthusiastic use. Our primary warning with the TLT 8 is in terms of fit. This is a very high volume boot. The shell and liner combination may be the highest volume ski boot we have ever tested. You can fill some of that space with a different liner and with different fit accouterments. Such adjustments are good for minor issues but won't make these boots work for narrow to average volume feet.

Performance Comparison


The non-standard aesthetic of the TLT8 is backed up by fairly...
The non-standard aesthetic of the TLT8 is backed up by fairly average performance.
Photo: Jediah Porter

Uphill Performance


Ten years ago now, Dynafit set the uphill touring boot bar with the TLT 5. The 5 was a huge leap from the 4 and a huge leap from anything else on the market (aside from skimo race boots). Touring efficiency in the TLT series since then hasn't changed a ton, but it doesn't really need to. The Dynafit TLT 8 tours as good as anything else in its weight class. The cuff moves through more range of motion than your ankles can, and the friction within that range is inhibited only by normal cuff/lower interaction and the flexion of the liner.

The TLT8 "Speed Nose", on the left, as compared to a typical boot...
The TLT8 "Speed Nose", on the left, as compared to a typical boot toe. The pivot is indeed closer to your foot, but none of our testers noticed it.
Photo: Jediah Porter

The "Speed Nose" is Dynafit's attempt to even further refine uphill performance by moving the pivot point closer to your toes. None of our testers, in testing a couple of years of Dynafit models with the Speed Nose, have noticed any difference in touring ergonomics. In fact, with the TLT 8, one tester didn't notice the speed nose at all, in any way. You might wonder what else this tester missed? This is why we enlist multiple testers.

Weight


The size 26.5 TLT 8 Expedition that we tested weighs five pounds five ounces per pair. You can lighten that up by removing the power strap and substituting an aftermarket liner. Further, there are other versions of the TLT 8 that are even lighter. At about five and a quarter pounds, the TLT 8 is pretty dang efficient and a good value. You can spend more and get lighter boots that perform similarly, but you won't find a lighter boot in this price range that performs as well.

The TLT 8 Expedition, paired with lightweight skis and tiny bindings...
The TLT 8 Expedition, paired with lightweight skis and tiny bindings for maximum efficiency. Step up to bigger skis and the boots will keep up and offer the support you look for.
Photo: Jediah Porter

Downhill Performance


Touring boots don't ski exactly like your resort boots; there is no way around that fact. There is a nearly perfect inverse relationship between uphill and downhill performance. For touring boots, the TLT 8 is great for skiing downhill. We found we could drive skis of every size at almost any speed. Maximum energy input will overwhelm the stiffness (in all directions) of the TLT 8, but careful attention to the limits will be rewarded with dynamic and exciting downhill performance. You can add or subtract the power strap to your taste. Unlike previous versions of the TLT line of boots, there is no removable boot tongue to remember and pack and fiddle with. In short, these are average touring boots for typical to slightly high-speed downhill backcountry skiing.

For your typical powder ski touring, the TLT 8 is in the sweet spot...
For your typical powder ski touring, the TLT 8 is in the sweet spot. Its performance is all-around great, but the fit is wide.
Photo: Ben Glatz

Comfort and Fit


The overwhelming fit attribute of the TLT 8 is that it is very high volume. Our average-footed primary test editor found himself virtually swimming around in them. This poor fit essentially ruined a 10000-foot day of perfect powder touring. Remember, fit matters, a lot, in touring boots. Well fit, you won't notice them up or down. Poor fitting boots can, like we noted early in testing the TLT 8, ruin your experience. Another tester used his own liners in the TLT 8 and found them to work much better. The stock liners in the TLT 8 are thin. Thicker liners can temporarily take up some space, but we don't recommend this strategy for your own boots; choose these boots only if you know you have high volume or wide feet. The good news is that few ski boots on the market are so wide and ready for this kind of user. The TLT8 stands out from the masses for its fit characteristics.

The tongue of the TLT 8 liner twists around and can be very...
The tongue of the TLT 8 liner twists around and can be very uncomfortable.
Photo: Jediah Porter

The TLT 8 liner tongue is configured such that it can twist around in touring mode and make for uncomfortable pressure points in downhill mode. This is easily remedied but is another step in transitions from uphill to downhill.

Warmth


The generous fit allows easy circulation, but the thin liner and moderate thickness shell materials compromise insulation. The end result is that the TLT 8 Expedition is about average in warmth. Many don't think of the warmth of their AT ski boots, but we think they should be. Backcountry skiing takes place in a cold environment. If something bad happens, you could be inactive for hours with only your ski boots to protect your feet. Choose your materials and fit wisely.

Ease of Use


Dynafit's TLT series of boots has swung all over the place, in terms of ease of use. With the TLT 5 and 6, the buckles were easy and clean, but the removable tongue was a pain to keep track of. The TLT 7 eliminated the removable tongue without losing uphill or downhill performance but added a cable-actuated lower buckle that was unnecessarily complicated. The TLT 8 eliminates the cable and keeps the simplicity of no removable tongue. The buckles are sturdy and stay out of the way while touring. The latest iteration of the upper cuff buckle is configured such that some transitions can be made with your pants cuffs down with no worry of a layer of pant material getting between buckle and shell. The power strap is cleverly configured to loosen up with one hand.

The forefoot buckle on the TLT 8 is simple and low profile. One...
The forefoot buckle on the TLT 8 is simple and low profile. One tester found it to be too low profile.
Photo: Jediah Porter

One of our only complaints came from one tester who noted that the lowest buckle sits real close to the boot. When cranked down tight, his gloved fingers couldn't get behind the buckle to open it up. Further, we don't really like the Dynafit "Speed Nose". This configuration limits binding compatibility (one tester joked that the "Speed Nose" is an Austrian middle finger to splitboarders. Hard boot splitboarders like to repurpose lightweight ski boots for use in their "plate" bindings; TLT 5 and 6 boots were popular among splitboarders. This snowboard strategy requires a toe welt that the TLT 8 doesn't have) and crampon compatibility with limited to unnoticeable walking and touring efficiency gains.

Value


They aren't expensive, and they aren't cheap. The design is one that will hold up to years of use, and the performance is well-rounded and can easily serve as your only ski touring boots. A concern, in terms of value, is the Speed Nose. You'll need to make sure bindings and crampons are all compatible with these boots.

Conclusion


Dynafit innovates and refines in almost equal measures. The TLT 8 is a refinement, combining some of the best innovations to their all-around lightweight touring boots of the last ten years. They also make some questionable choices with the super high volume fit and the welt-less toe. When it all works with your system and feet, the TLT 8 is great. If it doesn't work, there is very little you can do to adjust.

Jediah Porter