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Dynafit Hoji Pro Tour Review

Unique, innovative boots that really push the envelope way ahead in terms of downhill performance (at this weight point) but have some design and branding inconsistencies for actual backcountry and uphill use.
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Price:  $800 List | $799.95 at REI
Compare prices at 3 resellers
Pros:  Excellent downhill performance, lightweight, innovative
Cons:  Claimed easy transitions leave you in a tour mode that is significantly compromised., binding and crampon compatibility limited.
Manufacturer:   Dynafit
By Jediah Porter ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Mar 18, 2019
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66
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#4 of 10
  • Uphill Performance - 20% 5
  • Weight - 20% 6
  • Downhill performance - 30% 8
  • Comfort and Fit - 15% 7
  • Warmth - 10% 8
  • Ease of Use - 5% 3

Our Verdict

Dynafit keeps throwing hail mary passes with their ski boots. We like the way they push innovation and repeatedly revolutionize the business. The Hoji Pro Tour boot is the unique AT boot offering in years and years, and it shows. Downhill performance is amazing, and the good news is that that downhill performance doesn't inherently inhibit uphill performance. There are some other design and engineering attributes of the Hoji boots that compromise uphill performance, but behavioral and accessory adaptations mitigate these other issues. Basically, put some thought into your whole skiing kit and align your expectations for transitions with the Hoji boot, and you will find a pair of excellent backcountry skiing footwear. These are great downhill-oriented ski touring boots for he or she that will access their skiing on skins and with "normal" transitions. The downhill performance is indeed above-standard, but the marketing copy around transitions is a little misleading, and the complications around the unique toe profile are daunting at best.


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Overall Score Sort Icon
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Pros Excellent downhill performance, lightweight, innovativeExcellent downhill performance, light weight, proven styleLight, excellent freedom of motion, easy to use, skis downhill as well as any average touring bootGreat downhill performance, progressive forward flex, reliable buckles and ski/walk modeStiff, comfy fit, Intuition liner
Cons Claimed easy transitions leave you in a tour mode that is significantly compromised., binding and crampon compatibility limited.Moderate insulation, hard to get in and out ofLimited crampon compatibility, not as warm as the warmest boots availableHigh friction in range of motion, smooth soleHeavy, high friction cuff pivot
Bottom Line Unique, innovative boots that really push the envelope way ahead in terms of downhill performance (at this weight point) but have some design and branding inconsistencies for actual backcountry and uphill use.Whether a newcomer adjusting from the resort or a seasoned expert looking for work-horse shoes for 100+ backcountry days a season, it's is a top of the line contender.The result of decades of refinement and the performance shows; the proven attributes are welcome, and the innovative refinements work well enough.This is a ski touring boot that skis downhill almost as well as a resort boot.A downhill oriented boot for the discerning human-powered skier.
Rating Categories Dynafit Hoji Pro Tour Tecnica Zero G Tour Pro Dynafit TLT7 Performance Atomic Hawx Ultra XTD 120 Scarpa Maestrale XT
Uphill Performance (20%)
10
0
5
10
0
6
10
0
8
10
0
4
10
0
4
Weight (20%)
10
0
6
10
0
7
10
0
8
10
0
4
10
0
5
Downhill Performance (30%)
10
0
8
10
0
8
10
0
6
10
0
9
10
0
8
Comfort And Fit (15%)
10
0
7
10
0
8
10
0
7
10
0
7
10
0
7
Warmth (10%)
10
0
8
10
0
6
10
0
4
10
0
8
10
0
8
Ease Of Use (5%)
10
0
3
10
0
8
10
0
7
10
0
9
10
0
7
Specs Dynafit Hoji Pro... Tecnica Zero G... Dynafit TLT7... Atomic Hawx Ultra... Scarpa Maestrale XT
Weight size 26.5, pair 6 lbs 2 oz 6 lbs 0 oz 4 lbs 8 oz 7 lbs 5 oz 6 lbs 13 oz
Range of Motion; degrees 55 55 55 36 56
Binding Compatibility? Tech only, or Tech and DIN AT standard, or Tech, DIN AT and DIN Alpine/WTR Tech only WTR, Tech, and DIN AT Tech only WTR, Tech, and DIN AT WTR, Tech, and DIN AT
Stated Flex Index Not reported 130 Not reported 120 130+
Stated Last width 103.5mm 99mm 102mm 98mm 101mm
Alpine wrap or Tongue Tongue Alpine Wrap Tongue Alpine Wrap Tongue
Shell material Grilamid Grilamid Grilamid lower shell, Titantex Fiber cuff Grilamid Carbon-infused Grilamid

Our Analysis and Test Results

The eagerly anticipated and much-lauded (in pre-release testing) Hoji Pro Tour is a solid backcountry skiing and ski mountaineering boot. It brings unique engineering and innovative features to the market but is still surpassed in some ways by more traditionally constructed boots. Overlap boots are now lighter and more proven, while beefed-up randonnee racing boots tour way, way better. Some quirks of the Hoji boot keep us from granting it our highest award, but it skis well. Most interestingly, the Hoji boot skis downhill as well or better than most overlap constructed boots. Generally, we expect overlap boots to ski the best of the major design options. However, the "three-piece" construction of the Hoji boot is tuned for no-play, progressive downhill stiffness. We dig it, and you will too.

Performance Comparison


Fast  deep powder for days. No matter your style of backcountry skiing  the Hoji Boot is worth your consideration.
Fast, deep powder for days. No matter your style of backcountry skiing, the Hoji Boot is worth your consideration.

Uphill Performance


"Uphill performance", in our scoring matrix, is purely a function of cuff range of motion and friction within that range. We score weight elsewhere. In terms of touring cuff range and friction, there are two distinct modes of the Hoji Pro Tour. If used "as designed", uphill travel is below average. If you use it as most use their boots, uphill performance is about average. Let us elaborate. Dynafit has designed and marketed the Hoji boot as having a one-step uphill-downhill transition. With their "pants down always" branding and intention, the cuff lock, upper buckle, and power strap are activated and (partially) deactivated all with a mid-sized rear lever. When you adjust everything and use the boots this way, you get a tour mode that works but isn't as free-flowing as other options.

If you further loosen the buckles (requiring a pants cuff lift), you get range of motion more in line (but not yet quite as good) with that of the top scoring boots. It is important to note Dynafit's "Speed Nose" design, employed on the Hoji Pro Tour. By eliminating the traditional ski boot toe "ledge" (used in attaching some bindings and all automatic boot crampons) Dynafit can move the tech fittings further back, placing the pivot point in tour mode closer to one's foot. This has a noticeable, but very very minor advantage in touring. There are usability issues with this, noted below, that make it a net disadvantage to our review team.

For long touring stints  completely undoing the buckles of the Hoji Pro Tour is advised if not required. Here  Phelps Lake in Grand Teton National Park.
For long touring stints, completely undoing the buckles of the Hoji Pro Tour is advised if not required. Here, Phelps Lake in Grand Teton National Park.

Weight


The Hoji Pro Tour, in size 26.5, weighs six pounds two ounces. For as good as this boot skis, this is remarkable. When you consider that, just three years ago, we were excited for the six pound five ounce La Sportiva Spectre, the Hoji mass is remarkable. At a lower weight, the Hoji skis way, way better than the Best Buy Spectre. Materials are carefully chosen and stripped down on the Hoji boot.

A close up of the innovative but problematic Dynafit 'speed nose'. Touring efficiency is indeed enhanced  but not by much.
A close up of the innovative but problematic Dynafit 'speed nose'. Touring efficiency is indeed enhanced, but not by much.

Downhill Performance


Our team really liked the downhill performance of the Hoji. The biggest difference between the Hoji and other boots is the way the cuff locks to the lower boot shell. The tensioned mechanism creates a more positive connection that is very obvious in head-to-head "carpet testing". All other reviews focus on this difference, and it is indeed noticeable and better. However, we found that the positivity difference is virtually lost in all but the most discerning ski testers in very optimal conditions. The major perk of the Hoji boot's downhill performance is its smooth, stiff, and progressive forward flex. The graduated forward flexion is something we would expect from a resort overlap boot, not from a six pound touring boot. These things ski very, very well.

The innovative Hoji boots ski really  really well. In some ways  their clever attributes mask and distract from the excellent downhill skiing performance.
The innovative Hoji boots ski really, really well. In some ways, their clever attributes mask and distract from the excellent downhill skiing performance.

Comfort and Fit


Of course, most will have at least some work done on their AT ski boots to optimize fit and comfort. Our comments here, then, are very generalized and should be considered just a simple starting point. The liner included with the Hoji Pro Tour is soft and comfortable against your foot, right out of the box. For ongoing performance and fit, a stiffer liner will be better. Be careful about being seduced by the puffy and soft liner. The overall fit of the Hoji is relatively narrow, with a tall and roomy toe box and a tight heel pocket.

The "Hoji Lock" is indeed innovative but doesn't quite do what you wish it would or what it claims to do.
The "Hoji Lock" is indeed innovative but doesn't quite do what you wish it would or what it claims to do.

Warmth


Warmth is a function of fit (get your boots dialed in for maximum foot health) and amount of shell and liner material. The shell of the Hoji is thin, but the liner is pretty thick. The result is relatively warm boots.

Ease of Use


We have a few answers to the question, "How easy are the Hoji boots to use?". If you use them as intended for skin-accessed skiing in simple tech bindings, the Hoji boot is slicker than any other all-around or high performance AT ski boots. The "Hoji Lock" transition closure is brilliant and replicates skimo race gear in transition ease. The catches, though, are multiple. First, as noted above, touring mobility suffers until you lift your pant cuff and loosen things up further. Next is the very odd "Speed Nose". Dynafit, like they did with their TLT7 Performance boots, omitted the toe welt/ledge for the Hoji boots.

For tech binding skinning, this saves some weight and moves the pivot closer to your toes. These are good things. However, it preempts use with certain bindings, and it makes crampon use complicated. There are workarounds to the crampon thing, but it isn't straightforward. Overall, the usability issues, especially as compared to branding and marketing copy, of the Hoji, are multiple and significantly hamstring the overall performance.

In regular tech bindings (here  the Marker Alpinist) some of the usability issues of the Hoji boot are mitigated. Those usability issues are attributable  in part  to the "speed nose" you can see here.
In regular tech bindings (here, the Marker Alpinist) some of the usability issues of the Hoji boot are mitigated. Those usability issues are attributable, in part, to the "speed nose" you can see here.

Value


It is refreshing to watch Dynafit's top of the line AT ski boots come down in price. This is their flagship boot, and it is hundreds of dollars less expensive than previous Dynafit high-end ski boots. Provided the complicated "Hoji Lock" holds up for you, you will get years of excellent service from these boots. Note, though, that you will likely need to replace the liner for truly good fit and lasting performance.

Some of the boots we tested recently  stacked up next to the Dynafit Hoji. From left to right: Tecnica Zero G  Scarpa Maestrale  Dynafit Hoji  Scarpa Alien RS  Atomic Hawx Ultra 120.
Some of the boots we tested recently, stacked up next to the Dynafit Hoji. From left to right: Tecnica Zero G, Scarpa Maestrale, Dynafit Hoji, Scarpa Alien RS, Atomic Hawx Ultra 120.

Conclusion


We like the Dynafit Hoji Pro Tour but are not yet willing to make the enthusiastic recommendations that other reviewers are bestowing. We continue to stand by our methodology and conclude that so much of the other content you might find online is from reviews that are at least a little biased. The OutdoorGearLab model keeps the PR departments and associated obligations out of the mix. It is tricky on our end, but the result is that we can make thorough comparisons and draw authoritative conclusions. Overall, these boots challenge the front runners. On our overall matrix, we balance uphill and downhill attributes for how we ski and see the mountains. If you prioritize downhill performance more than we do, generally, the Hoji boot might be worth your while.


Jediah Porter