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Blizzard Sheeva 10 Review

While they were fun in fresh snow, and performed better than expected on-piste given their fat waists, the Sheevas didn't stack up against many of our other test skis.
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Price:  $600 List | $599.95 at REI
Compare prices at 3 resellers
Pros:  Solid powder performers, better on hardpack than expected from width, stable under foot
Cons:  Not great in crud, tips flap, aren't stable along the whole length of the ski
Manufacturer:   Blizzard
By Renee McCormack ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Oct 16, 2019
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58
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#11 of 16
  • Stability at Speed - 20% 6
  • Carving - 20% 6
  • Crud - 20% 5
  • Powder - 20% 7
  • Playfulness - 15% 5
  • Bumps - 5% 4

Our Verdict

The Blizzard Sheeva is kind of like a C-level student - it does a wide variety of things with a degree of competency, but doesn't necessarily stand out in any particular domain. Our expectations were also perhaps too high for this ski; one tester is a little obsessed with her pair of Black Pearls, and she imagined these would be the same, but fatter and better in powder. Unfortunately, they are not as dependable as the Black Pearl in many metrics, and while they do float well in powder, they're not as sensational there as we'd hoped from 102mm under foot. There is also a constant tendency towards tip-flapping that we found disconcerting.


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Blizzard Sheeva 10
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Overall Score Sort Icon
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Star Rating
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Pros Solid powder performers, better on hardpack than expected from width, stable under footIncredibly versatile, easy to ski, fun and quick, only 92mm makes it nimbleGreat float in powder, playful, decent stabilityUnparalleled stability at speed, crud-buster, lends you strengthA blast to ski, easy to turn, relatively stable, fantastic in powder
Cons Not great in crud, tips flap, aren't stable along the whole length of the skiNot the perfect powder partnerMore expensive, slightly lumbering in bumpsVery pricey, prefers faster straighter linesNot perfect carvers, some deflection in crud
Bottom Line While they were fun in fresh snow, and performed better than expected on-piste given their fat waists, the Sheevas didn't stack up against many of our other test skis.One of the most versatile skis on the market, this new Volkl is a Goldilocks ski - strong enough to battle in the crud, but soft enough for lighter mellower skiers to bend it.A great choice for a West Coast woman who loves getting out in the soft snow.If you like to go fast and want a one-ski quiver, this ski is absolutely worth the extra funds.Ripping skis for ripping chicks, or those on their way to becoming one, so fun and flexible.
Rating Categories Blizzard Sheeva 10 Volkl Secret 92 Rossignol Soul 7 HD W Kastle FX95 HP Elan Ripstick 94 W
Stability At Speed (20%)
10
0
6
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
10
10
0
8
Carving (20%)
10
0
6
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
7
Crud (20%)
10
0
5
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
10
10
0
8
Powder (20%)
10
0
7
10
0
9
10
0
10
10
0
9
10
0
9
Playfulness (15%)
10
0
5
10
0
10
10
0
9
10
0
7
10
0
10
Bumps (5%)
10
0
4
10
0
9
10
0
8
10
0
8
10
0
9
Specs Blizzard Sheeva 10 Volkl Secret 92 Rossignol Soul 7... Kastle FX95 HP Elan Ripstick 94 W
Intended Purpose All mountain/powder All mountain All mountain powder All mountain stability All mountain play
Ability Level All Levels All Levels All levels All levels All levels
Available Lengths 156, 164, 172, 180 149, 156, 163, 170 156, 164, 172, 180 173, 181, 189 156, 163, 170, 177
Shape 132-102-122 130-92-113 136-106-126 126-95-115 135-95-110
Waist Width 102 92 106 95 95
Radius 16 17.9 18 18 16.2
Rocker Tip and tail, camber underfoot Tip and tail, camber underfoot Tip and tail, camber underfoot Tip and tail, camber underfoot Tip and tail, cambered inside edge
Weight Per Pair (Pounds) 7.04 8.16 7.7 9.62 6.725
Construction Type Sandwich compound sidewall Full sidewall Sandwich Sandwich SST sidewall
Core Material Poplar, beech, balsa, paulownia Beech & Poplar, multi layer Paulownia wood silver fir, beech, Titanal, fiberglass Tubelite wood
Tested Length 172 170 172 173 170

Our Analysis and Test Results

We felt that Blizzard's Carbon Flipcore DRT technology, which attempts to strengthen the area of the ski underfoot while "reducing the torsional strength of the tip and tail" had pretty much exactly that effect. The parts of the skis under our feet felt quite solid and stable, but the lightened tips and tips (done in hopes of better powder flotation and greater ease of turning) felt insecure and frenetic. Unfortunately, their buoyancy didn't seem to be enhanced enough for the sacrifice in stability.

Performance Comparison


The Blizzards were fun on a powder day  keeping us afloat with their 102mm waists
The Blizzards were fun on a powder day, keeping us afloat with their 102mm waists

Stability at Speed


You can see the tips flapping on the Sheevas from a mile away when you get them moving at higher speeds. However, there is definitely a certain steadiness underneath your feet. Alas, the front third of the ski dancing around like a frog in a blender makes them uncomfortable at very high speeds. Their edge hold capabilities are somewhere in the middle of our test group.

We felt and saw the tips of the Sheevas flapping wildly when we pushed them for speed  but their edge-hold under foot on hard-pack was decent.
We felt and saw the tips of the Sheevas flapping wildly when we pushed them for speed, but their edge-hold under foot on hard-pack was decent.

Carving


Once again, the stability they display underfoot makes them fun for carving, if you can ignore the flappity-flop of the tips. They ski a little shorter than many others in our test, and also feel surprisingly quick for their large size. Their edge to edge agility is impressive for something as wide as 102mm underfoot. The 16m turn radius is unusual for a ski of this width, and it provides a zippy carve when laid on edge.

The center of the ski  under foot  likes to hold the edge and carve  but the tips and tails get a little loosey goosey.
The center of the ski, under foot, likes to hold the edge and carve, but the tips and tails get a little loosey goosey.

Powder


The Blizzard Sheeva 10 was a floaty, fun ski in the powder, but they didn't blow us away in this metric like we'd hoped from a fat ski. "They did the job," said one tester, but didn't do it spectacularly. They were solid and reliable in the fresh snow, but didn't inspire us to stay on them until the last chair.

The wide 102mm waist plus rockered tips and tails makes the Sheeva stay on top of deep snow
The wide 102mm waist plus rockered tips and tails makes the Sheeva stay on top of deep snow

Crud


We'd had hopes that the Sheeva would be a goddess powerful enough to bulldoze the chop, but in fact, it gave us a pretty bouncy ride and felt very limp and feeble towards the front of the ski.

The big tips tend to get deflected in the choppy snow  and they don't feel strong enough to push the chunks out of their way.
The big tips tend to get deflected in the choppy snow, and they don't feel strong enough to push the chunks out of their way.

Playfulness


While they are more playful than expected from such a bulky shape, we still didn't find the responsiveness and rebound we were looking for in these skis.

Bumps


The strength they provide under foot makes them ski fairly well in the bumps, despite their behemoth forms. They are more spry than anticipated from their size, and can move rapidly through the moguls when prodded.

Powder is where these skis are most fun
Powder is where these skis are most fun

Value


They can be found towards the middle to lower end of cost within our test group, and we think it's a square deal. However, there are other higher-scoring skis for similar costs that may suit better.

Conclusion


The Blizzard Sheeva 10 is a jack of all trades, but master of none.

While we got a kick out of the Sheevas in fresh snow  they weren't versatile enough to rank them higher
While we got a kick out of the Sheevas in fresh snow, they weren't versatile enough to rank them higher


Renee McCormack