Hands-on Gear Review

Keen Terradora WP Mid - Women's Review

The Terradora Mid are a lightweight boot that are made of breathable mesh fabric and a soft sole, making them a great option for warm conditions.
By: Jane Jackson ⋅ Senior Review Editor  ⋅  May 6, 2018
Price:  $140 List  |  $97.73 at REI - 30% Off
Pros:  Light, inexpensive, breathable, soft sole
Cons:  Lack support, very little tread, lack traction
Manufacturer:   Keen
59
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#17 of 17
  • Comfort - 25% 6
  • Support - 20% 5
  • Weight - 15% 8
  • Traction - 15% 6
  • Water Resistance - 15% 5
  • Durability - 10% 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

Our Verdict

The Keen Terradora Mid are lightweight and feel more like a shoe while providing the additional ankle support of a hiking boot. These boots are unique because they are made up almost entirely of mesh, which gives them a slipper-like feel. Though this feature is ideal for the overall weight, it makes them less durable than most other models in this review. For women looking for a boot that feels light on the foot, the Terradora is a great option.


Compare to Similar Products

Our Analysis and Test Results

Share:

For women looking for a soft, lightweight hiking boot, the Keen Terradora fit the bill. These boots are designed in response to the burly, leather, stiff-soled boots that tend to make up the hiking boot market. The Terradora has a mesh upper and a thin, flexible sole, which make them ideal for day hikes with light packs. Though the uppers are made up of fabric, these shoes will keep your feet dry in wet trail conditions. Unlike other Keen models we have tested in the past, the Terradoras have a very narrow toe box, making them more suitable for folks with a thin foot shape.

Performance Comparison



Comfort


The Terradora's performance in this category depends greatly on the size and shape of one's foot. If you have a narrow foot, these boots may offer more comfort. Our tester has wide feet and found the Terradoras were too tight in the toe box to be worn comfortably for long periods. These boots also have thin soles and lack the support of more substantial boots, like the Salomon X Ultra 3 Mid or the Lowa Renegade. This is great for shorter hikes, or when carrying less weight, but for long days on the trail, the Terradora will likely leave your feet feeling under-supported. The thin, mesh uppers make these boots great for warm conditions and light outings, but be warned that these boots do not hold up on longer, more rugged hikes.

From the uppers to the laces  the main feature of the Terradora is their light feel and breathable construction  making them a great warm-weather boot.
From the uppers to the laces, the main feature of the Terradora is their light feel and breathable construction, making them a great warm-weather boot.

Support


One of the defining features of the Terradora Mid is their thin sole, mesh upper, and overall lightweight design. Though the manufacturer claims that the boots have a full-length rock plate embedded in the sole, we found that the soles were thin enough to feel small pebbles on the trail through them. The thin sole also makes the boots way more flexible underfoot, more like a running shoe than a boot; for shorter hikes, this can be great. Sometimes it is nice not to have the stiffness of a traditional hiking boot when carrying a light load. A boot with a bit more support that maintains this light feel is the Oboz Sapphire which is lightweight but super stiff.

For a boot that is lightweight and breathable  the Terradora is a good choice. What it lacks in support it makes up for in its lightweight design.
For a boot that is lightweight and breathable, the Terradora is a good choice. What it lacks in support it makes up for in its lightweight design.

Weight


These boots shine in the weight metric. They are sold as a lightweight hiker, and that is exactly where the Terradora performs best. Unlike other Keen models we have tested, like the Targhee III Mid, these feel light on the foot. They lack the bulk of many of the other boots in this review that include leather in their design. The Terradora weighs in at 1.64 pounds, comparable to the Vasque Monolith UD and the Salomon X Ultra Mid 3. The Salomon model provides more support than the Terrradora, though they weigh the same.

Though the soles are fairly thin underfoot  the tread pattern is decent and provides enough traction to keep you going on rugged terrain.
Though the soles are fairly thin underfoot, the tread pattern is decent and provides enough traction to keep you going on rugged terrain.

Traction


The Terradora Mid is designed for maintained trails and moderate hiking conditions. For rugged trails with steep, rocky terrain, we suggest a more supportive boot with a more aggressive tread pattern, such as the Salmon X Ultra 3 Mid or the Oboz Bridger Mid BDry. The lug depths on the Terradora are more comparable to lighter boots we have tested in the past, such as the Merrell Capra Bolt. This means that small rocks and other terrain features can be felt through the thin soles. The thin nature of the sole also causes the boot to skid out on steep, rocky terrain more easily.

Though they claim to be waterproof  the Terradora are not ideal for constantly wet conditions.
Though they claim to be waterproof, the Terradora are not ideal for constantly wet conditions.

Water Resistance


The thin textile and mesh upper make the Terradora fall short when it comes to water resistance. These boots are made of a thin fabric that has a waterproof coating, but unfortunately, they were not as water resistant as we hoped. For a boot that functions better in wet conditions, try an all-leather boot, like the Keen Targhee III or the Oboz Sapphire.

The Keen Terradora are a lightweight boot that feels a bit more like a running shoe than a hiking boot.
The Keen Terradora are a lightweight boot that feels a bit more like a running shoe than a hiking boot.

Durability


With an upper constructed entirely of fabric, it's no surprise that the Terradora did not score very highly in the durability metric. The seams that run along the sides of the toe box are reinforced, but not enough to keep from wear to occur along the line where the foot flexes in step. The light feel of the boot comes at a price, and that is longevity. Unlike a boot with leather uppers and sturdy soles, like the Lowa Renegade, these boots will not last a lifetime. Similar to the Merrell Capra Bolt when it comes to design, the Terradora is a hiking boot with a running shoe design, making them lighter and less durable than other options on the market.

The Keen Terradora does not provide much support underfoot and began to hurt after a full day on the trail.
The Keen Terradora does not provide much support underfoot and began to hurt after a full day on the trail.

Best Applications


These boots are best suited for moderate day hikes, where carrying lots of weight is not part of the itinerary. The Terradora Mid has a thin sole that flexes with each step and is sensitive enough to feel pebbles and variations in terrain underfoot. For a slightly sturdier option, check out the Vasque Monolith UD or the Keen Targhee III Mid. These boots are also lightweight options but have a bit more support and durability than the Keen Terradora.

Value


The Terradora is a great deal overall. At $140, they are relatively inexpensive compared to other models on the market. That said, they are less durable and will not last as long as, say, the Oboz Bridger Mid or the Ahnu Montara WP. You can expect the Terradora to be easy to break in and soft in both the upper and sole. This makes them a good option for shorter day hikes, and the price is right for that purpose.

Conclusion


As far lightweight hikers go, the Keen Terradora performed fairly well in our review. Compared to some of the other value options, the Terradora provides a solid design and decent construction. They do fall short regarding support and durability, but this is to be expected in a boot that is both lightweight and entirely made of fabric. For the less-aggressive hiker looking for a comfortable, soft boot for day hikes, the Terradora fits the bill.

Jane Jackson

You Might Also Like

OutdoorGearLab Member Reviews


Most recent review: May 6, 2018
Summary of All Ratings

OutdoorGearLab Editors' Rating:  
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 (3.0)
Average Customer Rating:  
 (0.0)
Rating Distribution
1 Total Ratings
5 star: 0%  (0)
4 star: 0%  (0)
3 star: 100%  (1)
2 star: 0%  (0)
1 star: 0%  (0)


Have you used this product?
Don't hold back. Share your viewpoint by posting a review with your thoughts...