The world's most in-depth and scientific reviews of outdoor gear

Intex Challenger K2 Review

What it lacks in finesse and durability it makes up for with a shockingly low price tag and decent handling.
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Price:  $130 List | $91.98 at Amazon
Pros:  Very inexpensive, everything included, low and stable
Cons:  Not durable, pump inefficient, average portability
Manufacturer:   Intex Corp
By Maggie Brandenburg ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Oct 16, 2018
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56
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#6 of 7
  • Handling - 25% 6
  • Comfort - 25% 6
  • Ease of Set Up - 20% 7
  • Portability - 20% 5
  • Durability - 10% 2

The Skinny

We won't lie, we initially had some doubts about how the Intex Challenger K2 would perform on the water. But when we got it out there, we were pleasantly surprised with how reasonable this kayak is. It sits low and relatively stable on the water and tracks decently well with a long, detachable skeg. We also like that it comes with everything you need to get on the water (though we would recommend using life jackets as well!) for a low price. It doesn't win any awards, but we think there are several reasons to purchase the Challenger K2.

The Intex suffers most in the durability department, where it doesn't inspire confidence in our testers. If you're seeking a yak with a longer lifespan yet still modest price, the Sea Eagle 330 is a sturdy choice.


Compare to Similar Products

Our Analysis and Test Results

Performance Comparison


Send your kids out paddling without breaking the bank.
Send your kids out paddling without breaking the bank.

Handling


For how much this kayak resembles an oversized pool floatie (though slightly less so than the comically small Advanced Elements Packlite), we were rather pleased with how well it handles on the water. It rides low in the water, which makes it more stable to paddle and easier to get in and out - especially if you're hauling yourself back in after taking a refreshing dunk in the middle of the lake. This is a major advantage over the much taller Sea Eagle 330. It also helps to not catch the wind so much, giving you a bit of an easier task than you'd have paddling into the wind in a taller vessel. It has a long skeg which helps it track better - it was the longest skeg of any inflatable kayak we tested! Being a slightly longer boat than the Sea Eagle (11'5" vs. 10'10"), we found there to be an adequate amount of space to fit two people and paddle comfortably in unison.

That being said, taller paddlers are a tighter fit than, say, the Girl Scout troop that spent a hilarious evening touring the lake and jumping in and out of boats. We also discovered that forgetting to attach the skeg to the Intex makes it significantly less stable and in fact, one duo actually flipped the kayak multiple times! And while we appreciate that the paddles are included, we found that they are rather flimsy and not of much help pushing off of objects like the shore or an encroaching branch. Additionally, the Intex has no scupper hole, so any water that comes into your craft is going to continue along with you until you get to a point where you can get out and flip the whole thing upside down. Though when all was said and done, we found the Intex to handle decently well for an inflatable kayak.

This low-riding kayak isn't too tough to get back into if you happen to fall out...
This low-riding kayak isn't too tough to get back into if you happen to fall out...

Comfort


Though this kayak isn't our first choice for an eight-hour paddle upriver, it's pretty comfortable for short excursions. Riding low in the water with short sides makes it a snap to get in and out of. Though only an inch wider than the Sea Eagle, the Intex Challenger feels like a much wider boat because the sides aren't nearly as thick and don't encroach so far into the sitting space as the giant sides of the Sea Eagle. The seats are inflatable, like the Sea Eagle, but they velcro and buckle to the boat, allowing you to find a much more comfortable position specific to your needs than the Sea Eagle ever could. The paddles included with the Intex are also quite lightweight, which is always a bonus. They also have slightly squishy grips, which makes them a bit more comfortable - and different than most other paddles on the market! And to top it off there's a handy mesh covering the bow of the boat to store some extra items you may want to bring - just don't plan on them staying dry!

While we appreciate the attachedness of the seats, we felt that the backs are a tad short for our taste. This may not be an issue if you're leaning forward to paddle and make good headway, but if you'd rather recline and kick your feet up (maybe on your partner's shoulders if you're the stern passenger), these seats make that more challenging. We also found that as the Intex slowly started to deteriorate over the course of the season (details can be found in the Durability section), the ever-bulging sides that continued to grow became a bit of a paddling hinderance. But barring these few gripes, we were pretty comfortable spending an hour or two paddling around in the Intex Challenger.

Not the most plush of seats  but they are adjustable!
Not the most plush of seats, but they are adjustable!

Ease of Set Up


As far as inflatable kayaks go, the Intex is pretty easy to set up. It only has two compartments (the floor and the hull/sides) and the seats which are quick. It also comes with a handy little measuring gauge to help you easily tell when the kayak is full enough, rather than requesting a specific PSI with no way to measure it, as is common in many other kayaks like our Editors' Choice, the Advanced Elements AdvancedFrame, and our Best Buy award winner, the Sevylor K5 Quikpak. When you're done with your water adventure, it's very easy to dry the Intex with a towel - no having to wait in the sun for hours while some fabric hull dries out slowly. The Intex is made of a single layer of waterproof fabric. The whole Challenger K2 easily fits back into its oversized stuff sack as well, including all its components like the paddles and pump.

As much as we appreciate having a complete set up from the get-go with the Intex Challenger, we quickly discovered how much of a pain the included pump is. It's very small which makes it not only inefficient but also literally painful to use. You either end up bent all the way to the ground to use the pump holding it with a foot, or you get an intense arm workout as you accordion your way to a full kayak. This pump was one of our least favorite things about this model, though finding a different pump to fit the same valves is a cinch, so it was a short-lived complaint. Though the directions for inflating/deflating the Intex are laughable at best, it's truly an easy kayak to figure out even without written instructions. And while we appreciate the ease of the included kayak fullness gauge, it was so small and completely transparent that it was almost instantly lost in the sand. We also are grateful that Intex provided such a large storage sack for this kayak ensemble, as the rolling up process of the kayak tends to block the air valves, trapping air inside and making it challenging to flatten this boat completely. Aside from having a pretty ineffective pump, the Challenger K2 is a relatively easy, straightforward watercraft to inflate.

Not the easiest pump to use  but we appreciate that it is included at no extra cost.
Not the easiest pump to use, but we appreciate that it is included at no extra cost.

Portability


As a tandem kayak, you're unlikely to ever want to carry the Intex Challenger farther than you have to. Yet despite its size, this kayak retains a reasonable amount of portability. The duffle it comes in has plenty of space not only for its contents (boat, paddles, and pump) but with a bit of forethought can also accommodate a life vest or two! The Intex folds up into a pretty easy shape to store and we feel isn't too much to stuff into the back of a closet for the winter. The paddles are also light, and weighing in at 33 lbs 3 oz total, the Intex is the lightest tandem kayak we tested. And if you're carrying just the boat itself (without paddles or pump), you're only responsible for just over 27 lbs of watercraft. Additionally, if you decide to inflate the boat at your car and walk it down to the water fully set up, it comes with ropes along the bow and stern to quickly pick it up and go.

One of our least favorite ways to carry something heavy and awkwardly shaped is by carrying it entirely on one side of our bodies. With the duffle carry of the Intex, that's exactly what you'll end up doing. Despite being the lightest of the three tandem models we tested, lugging over 30 lbs of anything in a duffel bag with no shoulder strap and thin handles is not our idea of fun. And to top it off, the Intex has a pretty low capacity - just 400lbs allotted for two people and whatever else you'd planned to bring with on your adventure (dogs? food? water? gear?). Comparatively, the smaller (but heavier) Sea Eagle has a 500lb capacity and the decked out Aquaglide Columbia XP Tandem XL can carry up to 600lbs! But if you're sending the kids out to play for an afternoon, this may not matter so much to you. And if you can get them to carry it, even better!

The Intex Challenger is carried like a duffle bag - a 33 pound duffel bag...
The Intex Challenger is carried like a duffle bag - a 33 pound duffel bag...

Durability


The durability of the Intex Challenger K2 was by far the least impressive thing about it. We had a hard time finding any good aspects of this boat's durability. It survived having a very small, mellow dog riding on the bow, but we're not confident it would have done so well with a more excitable canine. Probably the least inspiring part of this kayak is how literally on the first inflation of the hull a large bulge appeared along one side in the middle, despite our testers carefully using the included gauge to get the proper amount of air. This bulge not only continued to grow through successive uses but also spread to the other side of the kayak, making the entire craft wider and unseemly.

The little dog test didn't cause the death of this kayak  but we found the bulging along the sides to be quite ominous.
The little dog test didn't cause the death of this kayak, but we found the bulging along the sides to be quite ominous.

Constructed of only a 30-gauge PVC vinyl, this tandem feels like a short step from your average pool floatie. It does come with repair patches, though these patches are small and self-adhesive (like a sticker) rather than having a separate, stronger glue to hold them on. However, as much as we used this boat, we never actually had to patch it.

Another aspect of this boat that worried us is that there are only two compartments that hold air. This is awesome when you're setting up and taking down the boat, as it saves time and effort. But if your hull popped while you were out on the water, you'd only have the floor (and seats) left to keep you afloat. Those aren't our favorite odds, and we recommend bringing (and preferably wearing) one life jacket for each passenger on any boat, especially this one. At the end of the day, the shockingly low durability of the Intex Challenger K2 is what kept it from being a good combo of performance and price. But if you're just looking for something for a weekend or a season, the Intex still might be in your wheelhouse - just don't expect anything miraculous from it.

Best Applications


If you're searching for a boat that gets the kids out on the lake or lets you finally run that section of a lazy river, the Intex will surely do that. It's well-suited to calm waters and won't break the bank. We also think the Challenger K2 provides a way to find out if you even like kayaking before committing hundreds or thousands of dollars to fancier and nicer boats. But if you want a boat that will last you for years, handle rougher waters, and scrape over submerged logs and rocks, you might consider something a little tougher like the Aquaglide Columbia XP.

A cargo net on the bow provides some extra storage space.
A cargo net on the bow provides some extra storage space.

Value


The Intex is a pretty decent value, all things considered. For around or under $100 you can get the complete set up to start paddling. Granted, you may find yourself needing to purchase a new one each summer or cutting the season short after a close encounter with a sharp boulder or enthusiastic dog. But compared to renting a kayak every time you drive up to the lake, the Intex is a pretty good solution for what you pay.

To paddle or not to paddle? Why not take turns in a tandem?!
To paddle or not to paddle? Why not take turns in a tandem?!

Conclusion


Are you a serious kayaker but want to downsize your craft to something you can stuff in a trunk or closet by breaking into the world of inflatable kayaks? The Intex Challenger is not the boat for you. Have you only been kayaking that one time on vacation and always wanted to be able to do it more but didn't want to spend the big bucks on a serious kayak? The Intex may be just your speed. A decently lake-worthy boat, the Intex Challenger K2 is an inexpensive total set up that provides just the right amount of access and fun for the not-so-serious kayaker. Easy to roll up and throw in the van when you take the kids up to the lake and small enough to stuff on a shelf in the garage when you're not using it. It's not the boat to last you a lifetime, but it might be the right boat to help you make the memories of a lifetime!

Paddle away for a surprisingly low cost in the Challenger K2.
Paddle away for a surprisingly low cost in the Challenger K2.


Maggie Brandenburg