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Schwinn 130 Upright Bike Review

An upright exercise bike with connected features at a reasonable price
Schwinn 130 Upright Bike
Editors' Choice Award
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Price:  $349 List | $349.00 at Amazon
Pros:  Good exercise quality, Bluetooth connectivity for use with Zwift and Explore the World apps, program workouts, reasonable price
Cons:  No handlebar height adjustment, more basic display than previous version
Manufacturer:   Schwinn Fitness
By Jeremy Benson ⋅ Senior Review Editor  ⋅  Dec 17, 2020
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76
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#3 of 9
  • Exercise Quality - 30% 8
  • Comfort - 20% 8
  • User Interface - 20% 7
  • Features - 20% 8
  • Setup/Portability - 10% 6

Our Verdict

The Schwinn 130 Upright is a quality exercise bike at a reasonable price. Updated for the 2020 model year, this affordable upright-style model now comes with Bluetooth and the ability to work with Zwift and Explore the World apps(subscriptions required). It's got 16 levels of smooth, quiet magnetic resistance that we found to provide a huge range of difficulty suitable for users of all fitness levels. It can be operated manually or with any of its 12 interval or challenge program workouts. It has a streamlined console with intuitive controls and an easy to read LCD screen that shows all of your workout information at a glance. It also comes with a number of user-friendly features and comfort/fit adjustments. We feel it is also an impressive value given its affordability, good exercise quality, and connectivity.

Compare to Similar Products

 
Awards Editors' Choice Award Editors' Choice Award    
Price $349.00 at Amazon$899 List$399 List$999.99 at Amazon$349 List
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Pros Good exercise quality, Bluetooth connectivity for use with Zwift and Explore the World apps, program workouts, reasonable priceSmart/connected features, works with Peloton and Zwift apps, excellent warranty, 100 levels of magnetic resistance, comes with hand weightsExcellent workout quality, huge resistance range, loads of features,Quality feel and finish, 32 levels of smooth magnetic resistance, smart/connected features, excellent workout qualityVersatile, bike and desk in one, feature packed, folds for storage
Cons No handlebar height adjustment, more basic display than previous versionMore expensive, speed and distance on display seems inaccurate, doesn't work perfectly with ZwiftMore expensive, non-padded seat, heavy, large footprintRequires a Bluetooth connection and device to operate, only works with the EchelonFit app, more expensiveHeavy, sub-par display and controls, may not fit taller users
Bottom Line A reasonably priced upright model with connected featuresA high-quality spin bike with connected features at a reasonable priceA high quality, reasonably priced, and fully-featured recumbent from a top brandA quality exercise bike that rivals the biggest names in the businessThis desk bike hybrid is a convenient and versatile option for exercising and/or working at home
Rating Categories Schwinn 130 Upright Bike Schwinn IC4 Nautilus R614 Recumbent Echelon EX-3 Exerpeutic Exerwork 2000i Fo...
Exercise Quality (30%)
8
9
8
9
6
Comfort (20%)
8
8
7
8
8
User Interface (20%)
7
7
8
5
7
Features (20%)
8
9
9
8
8
Setup Portability (10%)
6
5
4
6
6
Specs Schwinn 130... Schwinn IC4 Nautilus R614... Echelon EX-3 Exerpeutic...
Style Upright Upright Recumbent Upright Desk Bike, Semi-Recumbent
Resistance Settings 16 levels 100 levels 20 levels 32 levels 24 levels
Measured Weight 61 lbs 106 lbs 84.4 lbs 105 lbs 67 lbs
Measured Dimensions 42" L x 21.25" W x 51.5" H 48.75" L x 21.25" W x 52" H 64" L x 28" W x 49.5" H 54.5" L x 20" W x 55" H 43" L x 25" W x 50.5" H
Foldable No No No No Yes
Folded Dimensions n/a n/a n/a n/a 30" L x 25" W x 61.5" H
Max. Weight Capacity 300 lbs 330 lbs 300 lbs 300 lbs 400 lbs
Recommended Height Range not specified, 13 inches of seat height adjustment not specified 13" range of seat adjustment 4'11" to 6'4" 5'1" to 6'3"
Resistance type Magnetic Weighted flywheel with adjustable magnetic resistance Magnetic Weighted flywheel with adjustable magnetic resistance Magnetic
Resistance Adjustment type Buttons Knob Buttons Knob Buttons
Preprogrammed Workouts 13, 1 HIIT Interval, Profile, Heart rate Control No 22, (9 Profile, 8 Heart Rate Control, 2 Custom, 2 Fitness Test, 1 Quick Start) No 24 courses
User Profiles No No Yes, 2 No No
Heart Rate Sensor Yes Yes Yes No No
Digital Display LCD display: 5" W x 3" H LCD (measure) DualTrack LCD screen, upper: 5" W x 3" H, lower: 5" W x 1" H No (the Echelon app and a device are required) LCD display: 2.25" W x 1.125" H
Display Information Resistance level, course for the program, speed, distance, elapsed time, rpm, calories, and heart rate distance, time, speed, calories, RPM, heart rate 2 screens, upper screen shows program display: resistance level and course for the program, intensity display, heart rate zone display, user display, achievement, and goal display (countdown), lower screen shows: speed, time, distance, resistance level, RPM, calories, and heart rate n/a distance, calories burned, time, speed, odometer, resistance elevels, and scan
Other Features Bluetooth, works with Zwift and Explore the World, bottle cage, pedals with adjustable straps, heart rate sensors, adjustable handlebars, transport wheels, device shelf Bluetooth, works with Zwift and Peloton apps, USB charging port, device shelf, 2 water bottle holders, 3 lb weights, weight cradles, Bluetooth Heart rate armband, dual sided pedals with cleats Water bottle holder, Devce Shelf, 3 speed fan, Speakers, USB charger, Auxillary cable Bluetooth, works with Echelon Fit app, 2 bottle cages, rack for handweights (weights not included), transport wheels, dual sided pedals, adjustable device holder,
Warranty Frame: 10 years, Parts: 2 years, Electronics: 1 year, Labor: 90 days Frame: 10 years, Parts: 3 years, Labor: 1 year Frame: 10 years, Parts: 2 years, Electronics: 1 year, Labor: 90 days 1 year limited parts and labor 3 year limited

Our Analysis and Test Results

The Schwinn 130 Upright exercise bike was recently updated for the 2020 model year. It looks nearly identical to the previous version, although they made several changes to the user interface/display, as well as the number of resistance settings and workout programs. Perhaps the most interesting update is Bluetooth connectivity, making it compatible with third-party apps like Zwift and Explore the World (subscriptions required). While it is still a relatively basic machine, we found the reasonably priced 130 Upright to offer a quality exercise experience that has been enhanced by its new connected features.

Performance Comparison


The Schwinn 130 Upright is a quality exercise bike at a reasonable...
The Schwinn 130 Upright is a quality exercise bike at a reasonable price.
Photo: Jeremy Benson

Exercise Quality


The 130 Upright is a solid performing exercise bike that delivers a relatively high-quality exercise experience. Its upright style feels quite similar to riding a regular bike, and we found it to be sturdy enough to handle hard, out of the saddle efforts. It can't quite match the smoothness of the higher-end spin bikes, but it has a large resistance range that is suitable for users of all fitness levels. It also comes with 13 workout programs as well as the ability to connect with your device and ride with interactive and virtual training apps like Zwift and Explore the World. Sure, it's relatively basic, but we think it still provides a workout experience that will satisfy most users.


When Schwinn updated the 130 Upright they reduced the number of magnetic resistance levels from 20 down to 16. Despite having fewer levels to choose from, there is still a huge range of difficulty that should be adequate for nearly all fitness levels. Level 1 is quite easy and feels like spinning with virtually no resistance, while level 16 is so challenging that it will have even the fittest riders gritting their teeth while doing high-intensity intervals. The only real drawback to having fewer resistance settings, as far as we could tell, is that the jump between them is slightly larger and more noticeable. That said, we found that we were able to work out as hard or easy as we wanted and didn't feel limited by this change.

The 130 Upright has a variety of programs to choose from.
The 130 Upright has a variety of programs to choose from.
Photo: Jeremy Benson

You have several options when you start a ride on the 130 Upright. The most straightforward is a manual workout where you dictate the resistance level by manually adjusting it during your ride. It also comes with 12 additional program workouts. Ten of these are challenge programs with courses like "rolling hills", "pyramids, and "uphill finish" that change the resistance level for you and simulate real-world riding situations. It also has an option for a HIIT interval workout that switches between periods of easy spinning and high intensity pedaling. Lastly, there is a heart rate control program where you can use the handlebar heart rate sensors or a connected telemetry sensor to workout at or near a predetermined heart rate. The challenge programs give you the option to choose a time goal in 1-minute increments, while the interval program has 12-minute time goal increments. Unfortunately, there is no way to set time, distance, or calorie goals in a manual workout, but it's easy enough to keep track of on your own by looking at the screen.

The 130's connected features bring its exercise quality to another...
The 130's connected features bring its exercise quality to another level. We tested it with Zwift and it seemed to work quite well.
Photo: Jeremy Benson

In addition to the workout options listed above, the 130 Upright also features Bluetooth to connect with your device for use with Zwift and Explore the World apps. Both of these apps offer free trials, but you'll need to pay for a monthly subscription to enjoy the full virtual and interactive training experiences they offer. A Zwift subscription costs $14.99 a month and gives you access to different Zwift "worlds", courses, routes, group rides, races, challenges, fitness tests, and training plans. A monthly subscription to Explore the World is $9.99 ($59.99 for an annual subscription), and it offers scenic videos from beautiful locations around the world to follow along with while you ride that automatically adjust to your speed. While testing with Zwift, we found our power output, measured in watts, and speed readings to seem relatively accurate.

The padded seat is a lot like a traditional bike seat that you might...
The padded seat is a lot like a traditional bike seat that you might find on a cruiser bike. The shape should work for most people and it doesn't impede the pedal stroke in any way.
Photo: Jeremy Benson

Comfort


We spent many hours testing the 130 Upright and found it to be a relatively comfortable exercise bike. It features a moderately large padded seat, a decent range of seat height adjustment, and a large padded handlebar with angle adjustment. As an upright style bike, the seated position is similar to that of a normal bike, although it has a somewhat more relaxed, non-aggressive body position. While it doesn't feature the same level of adjustability as the high-end spin bike competition, it gets the job done, and comfortably at that.


The 130 Upright comes with a relatively large and moderately padded seat. This seat looks a lot like a seat you'd find on a cruiser bike, and it has an agreeable shape that should work well for most users. It strikes a good balance by being big and wide enough to support riders who prefer a more casual seated position, without being so wide that it impedes the pedal stroke when you're really getting after it. The seat's metal rails allow for approximately one inch of fore/aft adjustment. The seat sits atop an adjustable seatpost that has 13 inches of vertical adjustment. Schwinn doesn't specify a recommended height range, though we feel it should work for people between 5'0" and 6'2", and possibly a few inches on either side of that range depending on inseam length and preferences. The large padded handlebar allows for a huge variety of hand positions, plus its angle can be adjusted to optimize it for your preferences. Unfortunately, there is no height adjustment for the handlebar like you might find on some spin bikes. The pedals also feature adjustable straps to keep your feet in position and prevent them from slipping off while riding.

The 130 Upright has a streamlined console with a simple and...
The 130 Upright has a streamlined console with a simple and intuitive button layout and an easy to read LCD screen.
Photo: Jeremy Benson

User Interface


The 2020 updates to the 130 Upright included a new, smaller, and more streamlined console. They have done away with the dual-track display of the previous version, and the new console features a single screen and simplified button layout. The screen displays all of your pertinent workout information at a glance, and the controls are intuitive and user-friendly. When used with third-party training apps like Zwift and Explore the World, your device serves as the monitor and can rest on the console's device shelf while you ride.


The new console on the 130 Upright has a total of 9 buttons that control all of its functions. The bike needs to be plugged in to power it, but once it is, the console powers up automatically when the pedals move or any button is pushed. Starting and stopping a workout is done with the Start and Pause/Stop buttons. The machine defaults to a manual workout, or you can choose an interval or program workout. The resistance is increased or decreased one level at a time by pressing the up and down arrows on the right side of the console. On the left side, there is a Display button for changing info on the screen and a Bluetooth button used when syncing to a device.

The screen shows distance, time, estimated calories burned, RPM...
The screen shows distance, time, estimated calories burned, RPM, speed, heart rate, resistance level, and your course profile.
Photo: Jeremy Benson

The screen is 5 inches wide and 3 inches tall. Across the bottom, it shows distance, elapsed time, and estimated calories burned. On the right side of the screen are two more data fields, one that shows current speed or RPM, and another that displays your heart rate when using the contact sensors or a linked heart rate monitor. The majority of the screen is taken up by graphical display of your current resistance setting, workout progress, or program workout. Each resistance level, 1-16, is represented by one bar in the column on the graph, and each column represents one minute of elapsed time.

If using either the Zwift or Explore the World apps, you will need to use your own device to connect to the 130 Upright via Bluetooth and to serve as the monitor. Once you have either app on your device, we tested using an iPhone 11 and an iPad Pro, you open the app and connect to the bike. You can use the device shelf on the console to hold your smartphone, tablet, or laptop while you ride. We found the device shelf to work well when using Zwift, although if you are just using your device to watch a show, for example, it blocks the display screen.

Features like a bottle holder, heart rate sensors, and an...
Features like a bottle holder, heart rate sensors, and an angle-adjustable handlebar help enhance the exercise experience.
Photo: Jeremy Benson

Features


The 130 Upright has a number of features for both comfort and to enhance the overall exercise experience. The most exciting feature included in the 2020 model year update is its connectivity. You can now connect to apps like Zwift and Explore the World (subscriptions required) on your device through Bluetooth for a virtual, interactive cycling experience. With 13 programs and manually controlled workouts, the 130 Upright's connectivity gives the user a lot of options.


In exchange for its connectivity, the new 130 Upright has lost a few of the features found on its predecessor, most notably the dual-track display, integrated speakers, and the fan. The new display is smaller and more streamlined, with a simple and intuitive button layout and a single 5 x 3-inch screen. It still comes with integrated transport wheels, levelers in the rear stabilizer, a device shelf, bottle cage, adjustable pedal straps, a large range of seat height adjustment, and handlebar angle adjustment. It has contact heart rate sensors integrated into the handlebar, plus it can now work with telemetry heart rate sensors through its Bluetooth connection.

It isn't especially difficult, but the 130 Upright was among the...
It isn't especially difficult, but the 130 Upright was among the most time-consuming models to assemble.
Photo: Jeremy Benson

Ease of Setup/Portability


The 130 Upright is about average in terms of its setup and portability. Like all of the exercise bikes we tested, some assembly was required. It took just under an hour to get our test bike from the box to ready to ride. Printed instructions and all of the tools and hardware needed to complete the process are included. Our lead tester was able to complete the assembly process by himself, although a few of the steps were somewhat awkward and a second set of hands would be helpful at times. Most notably, connecting the wires between the front/handlebar mast and the lower/main body of the bike is a task for two people. Beyond that, the remaining steps are all relatively straightforward, albeit somewhat time-consuming.


Once assembled, the 130 Upright is relatively easy to move around on flat ground by tipping it forward and rolling it on the transport wheels integrated into the front stabilizer. Due to its 61 lb weight and size, however, moving it up or down stairs is a task best suited for two people. With measured dimensions of 42" L x 21.25" W x 51.5" H, it takes up an average amount of space, though its footprint is notably smaller than recumbent models or the larger, higher-end spin bikes.

The 130 Upright is a great exercise bike that should meet the...
The 130 Upright is a great exercise bike that should meet the demands of all but the most hardcore of indoor cyclists.
Photo: Jeremy Benson

Value


We think the 130 Upright is a good value. Not only is this bike comfortable, but it provides a quality workout experience along with connected features that you typically find on models that cost at least twice as much. It's not the fanciest bike out there, but we feel it is a great option considering its reasonable price.

Conclusion


The Schwinn 130 Upright is a reasonably priced exercise bike with connected features. This comfortable upright-style bike has 16 levels of quiet magnetic resistance, 13 program workouts, plus the ability to connect to your device and work with popular training apps like Zwift. We found it to provide a good quality workout with a resistance range suitable for all fitness levels, and connected features to take your training to another level if you choose. For the price, we don't think it gets much better than the 130 Upright.

The Schwinn 130 Upright is a great exercise bike, and we feel it is...
The Schwinn 130 Upright is a great exercise bike, and we feel it is also a great value.
Photo: Jeremy Benson

Jeremy Benson